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EXPLORATION AND WAR continued...

THE AMERICAN FUR TRADE continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
161   [Stone, Bostwick, & Co.] Autograph letter signed by fur trader David Stone, Detroit, July 6, 1824. With red oval postmark and 25 rate. Stone writes Ramsey Crooks of the
American Fur Company explaining that he closed the posts at Lower and Upper S[Stone, Bostwick, & Co.] Autograph letter signed by fur trader David Stone, Detroit, July 6, 1824. With red oval postmark and 25 rate. Stone writes Ramsey Crooks of the American Fur Company explaining that he closed the posts at Lower and Upper Sandusky (Ohio) and returned the goods there to James Abbott:"except one Bale Blankets which had not been opened. Those I took...I found $4475 worth of goods on hand which I sold them on a credit... For the balance I get their furs, some pork, Beeswax, &c, all of which will not pay the account. The balance I shall have well secured by personal security. This Establishment will close up without loss or gain...I sold JC Hunt about 1200 dollars worth of Goods last season for Fort Meigs...As respects the Dequindre's, I believe they will pay up...Their Wabash and Fort Wayne traders all pay."Stone had founded Stone, Bostwick & Co., early competitors of the AFC, but in 1823, Astor bought them out and hired Stone to take over operations in Detroit. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $300.00
Will close during Public Auction
162   [Sublette, William, Estate of David Cunningham] Five documents and one letter, including depositions in the cases of Joseph Cunningham, administrator of the estate of David Cunningham; William Hanna, administrator for John Hanna; and Austin Sheldon, administrator of John Gaither; all against defendant William Sublette. All seek to gain pay they believe is owed to the deceased men whose estates they administer. Orville D. Shanks and Robert Evans are deposed in the Cunningham case, and confirm that Cunningham was with Jedediah Smith in August 1827 when the party was attacked by Native Americans, but neither can confirm that he was working directly for Smith, Jackson, & Sublette. Both add that Joseph Cunningham, the deceased's brother, was paid money owed his brother after the death. The other two depositions, both by Arthur Black, confirm respectively that John Hanna and John Gaither were also among those killed in the attack. With three additional documents from the cases, including one signed by Joseph Cunningham, accepting $250 "in full pay of all demands of David Cunningham,"Q 1830. Depositions, especially Black's, with fold wear including partial or total clean separations. Finally, with a letter to Hugh Campbell, Robert Campbell's brother, in Richmond, from William Snodgrass, regarding the estate of Thomas Virgin, another man who lost his life during the fight. Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $650.00
Will close during Public Auction
163   [Sublette, William, and the Galena Mining Company] Three documents signed by Lemon Parker, Galena, IL, all from March 1829. The first binds Parker as principal of the Galena Mining Company to William Sublette for $325; the second, just four days later, is an action against Sublette for $162.50, in which Parker and the mining company get a writ of attachment, since Sublette is not a resident of Illinois, but of the Michigan Territory; the last, two weeks later, is Parker's bond that he will keep the sheriff harmless in executing a writ of attachment on Sublette's former home in Galena, now occupied by John Hoffa. Est. $500-750

SOLD for $350.00
Will close during Public Auction
164   Sublette, William, on the Death of Jedediah Smith, Highly important Sublette, William, Autograph Letter Signed W.L. Sublette, 2 pages, legal folio, Walnut Creek near the
Arkansaw, September 24, 1831. He writes to William H. Ashley in St. LouiSublette, William, on the Death of Jedediah Smith, Highly important Sublette, William, Autograph Letter Signed "W.L. Sublette," 2 pages, legal folio, "Walnut Creek near the Arkansaw," September 24, 1831. He writes to William H. Ashley in St. Louis:"We have had some hard luck Since we left St. Louis. On our Way out to Santafee we lost Mr. Minter killd On On (sic) the pawnee fork we supose by the pawnees. It hapened On the 19th of June (sic; actually May 19). Mr. J.S. Smith was Killd on the Cimeron June 27th by the Comanches. We met no Other losses by indians & arive in Santafee July 4th. The trace to Santafee has been well watcht by diferent nations of Indians this Season anoying the traders there & back to this place. We have not lost any men as yet On Our return & but fiew animals...We are now within 260 miles of Indipendence...""Young Mr. Austin Smith is in Company. Mr. Peter Smith & Mr. Parkman is in the Spanish Cuntery. I dont think they have maid any money...We Equipt Mr. Thomas Fitzpatrick Out from Taos...with about 40 men & Supplies...We heard from Milton Sublette by the Santafee trapers." Austin and Peter Smith were Jedediah's brothers. Milton Sublette was the brother and frequent business partner of the letter's author. Jedediah Smith had gone to search for water while on the trail to Santa Fe and never returned. Men from the expedition later found a Mexican trader in the town selling items that had belonged to Smith. The trader said he had gotten them from Comanches who said they'd killed a white man for them. (imagea) (Image) Est. $7,500-10,000

SOLD for $23,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
165   Sublette, William L., Choice political content autograph letter signed to William H. Ashley, Lexington, MO, October 16, 1831. Returning from Santa Fe, he reports:I have not
lost any animals since I wrote to you from the Arkansaw (see letter abSublette, William L., Choice political content autograph letter signed to William H. Ashley, Lexington, MO, October 16, 1831. Returning from Santa Fe, he reports:"I have not lost any animals since I wrote to you from the Arkansaw (see letter above) My animals was weak at the time & I had to travel slow. Mr. Smith left here this Morning. I have Engage him to hall part of my Loading down...I dont expect to halt any more until I reach St. Louis which will be as soon as possible. The Majority of the people in this County & Jackson appears to be in favour of y our Election. I don't think there is the least doubt...I have not ascertain any thing Certain how furrs Sell but report large fine ones five to Six Dollars per lb." General Ashley, founder of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, was at the time running for US Representative from Missouri. As Sublette reports, he was victorious. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
166   Sublette, William, Choice Autograph Letter Signed to General William H. Ashley, 2 pages, 4to, Philadelphia, December 28, 1832. He and his partner, Robert Campbell, have been
buying up dry goods to furnish to the fur traders at the 1833 rendezvousSublette, William, Choice Autograph Letter Signed to General William H. Ashley, 2 pages, 4to, Philadelphia, December 28, 1832. He and his partner, Robert Campbell, have been buying up dry goods to furnish to the fur traders at the 1833 rendezvous: "Siter Price &c and Messrs Gill Campbell & C have furnished the greater Part of the goods...Our Powder we Will have to pay Cash for...Whole will be about two thousand dollars which will be able to pay for in 40 or 50 days. The balance is On a credit of twelve & Eighteen months....We will Proced On to New york on the 30th (see following letter) ...It is Our wish you would Write to Reddle Forcy the & C Pittsburgh Concerning two Keel boats which we Wish to Get...from Eighteen to twenty tons burthen not Exceding twenty ton...New if they can be had in time...Rigg complete and maid for fast Sailing...If there should be any difficulty in Obtaining the two boats in Pittsburgh there can be no doubt one Obtained in LouisVille or likely two...We wish the boats against the 20th of Febuary if the river should be Open at that time...Our goods we have got here is now Packing & will be on the road next week." Partial fold splitting repaired with transparent paper. (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $3,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
167   Sublette, William, Excellent content Autograph Letter Signed W.L. Sublette, 2 pages, 4to, New York, January 4, 1833 (Sublette has misdated it 1832 and overwritten it) to
William H. Ashley in Washington:I have been to see Mr. Tracy & Mr. HalsSublette, William, Excellent content Autograph Letter Signed "W.L. Sublette," 2 pages, 4to, New York, January 4, 1833 (Sublette has misdated it 1832 and overwritten it) to William H. Ashley in Washington:"I have been to see Mr. Tracy & Mr. Halsey. Mr. Tracy I find has maid Sale of the furrs left with him & Mr. Halsey has those four Hoggshed On hand and I think likely there to remain. He has furr to sell for the american furr Company & furrs for Powell which has just landed. The furr Powell have sent is Bennts [Charles Bent's] furrs from Santafee. Mr. Tracy has about 1200 lbs of Santafee furr also...Mr. Tracy...thinks he can make Sale of [the four hogsheads] likely for four Dollars...I have been thinking it might be best to Write to Mr. Allison & Anderson at Louis Vill for ward On all the furrs...It is my wish to Close Sales as Soon as posible that On my return to Missouri I may be able to make a Setlemt. with Mr. [David] Jackson and also with the Rocky Mountain fur Company." Most likely Sublette needed to settle with David Jackson and the RMF as a result of his and Jackson's selling out Smith, Jackson, & Co to the RMF Co in 1830. Subsequently the two partners and their third, Jedediah Smith, went on a trading expedition to Santa Fe. It was on that expedition that Smith was killed by a Comanche war party while searching for water. (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $5,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
168   Sublette, William, Excellent association autograph letter signed twice (as Wm. Sublette and as Sublette & Campbell), New York, January 8, 1833. Addressing the US Congressman
from Missouri as Genl. Wm. H. Ashley (he had been a brigadier geneSublette, William, Excellent association autograph letter signed twice (as "Wm. Sublette" and as "Sublette & Campbell"), New York, January 8, 1833. Addressing the US Congressman from Missouri as "Genl. Wm. H. Ashley" (he had been a brigadier general of volunteers during the War of 1812), he pens:"While in the Rocky Mountains last summer we were informed that a man named (David) Montgomery who was attached to the American Fur Co's party had been killed by the Blackfeet about a year Since while on express to meet Fontenelle & Dripps, but we Know not what his Christian name was, nor where he was from Originally...In presenting your letter to Mess. Wolfe Spier & Clarke and mentioning the time which we require - Eighteen months - they told us that they were coming from you. They felt disposed to aid us...and that by having your acceptance they would give us credit of twelve months." Sublette accepts the terms and adds further business details. David Montgomery and John Gray had gone in search of Andrew Drips' trapping party and were ambushed on March 9, 1832. Montgomery was killed and Gray severely wounded. Postmarked address leaf rated "37 1/2" and corrected to free as Ashley was a member of Congress and therefore received his mail free. (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $4,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
169   Sublette, William, Autoraph Letter Signed, to Robert Campbell from New York, January 11, 1833, as they prepared their first venture as Sublette & Campbell, outfitters to the
fur traders. I have just returned from the post office and am crazy aSublette, William, Autoraph Letter Signed, to Robert Campbell from New York, January 11, 1833, as they prepared their first venture as Sublette & Campbell, outfitters to the fur traders. "I have just returned from the post office and am crazy as a loon with rage. No letters, yet I don't think it will afect me so serious as to make me loose three meals in the same day...I called on Mr. Spies to know respecting the scalpers (knives) & gunns those Bloody Weapons. After Ringing his hands &c you know he state he could not get them...As for the 28 fusils he said if he purchased them he would have to pay for them on the first of febuary next cash and he would loose on them for he gave us a credit of six months...God help me you know my temper, I andswerd him no, if his Credit was not good for Six months mine was...I have had an offer for my Beaver of three fifty. D___d the yankis as will as the Nullifyers!" Nullifiers were those, especially South Carolinians, who believed states had a constitutional right to nullify federal laws they felt went against the constitution. Specifically they nullified tariffs that were intended to protect American manufactures from foreign competition. These generally favored domestic merchants like Sublette and angered producers of export raw materials, such as cotton growers. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $3,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
170   Sublette, William, Good content autograph letter regarding boats for the Missouri River, signed to Robert Campbell, Washington, February 3, 1833. He is there visiting William
H. Ashley after attempting to purchase supplies on the East Coast for hSublette, William, Good content autograph letter regarding boats for the Missouri River, signed to Robert Campbell, Washington, February 3, 1833. He is there visiting William H. Ashley after attempting to purchase supplies on the East Coast for his and Campbell's venture to the 1833 rendezvous to sell supplies for fur. "I have not been able to Settle my Business as I wisht with Ashley - had not the papers I wisht with him. I have had no acount as yet of the Beaver furr from Louisville...I wrote Riddle & Forsythe yesterday to make Sale of that hoggs head there at four dollars (see previous letters)...I expect to set out for Pittsburgh imediatley and I shall also write to Mr. Tracy to call at Wolf Spies & Clarks and see how our Rifles are...""I have some what Chaing'd my notion as it respects the Sise of our two boats. I think one out to carry about 20 ton and the Other from 20 to 25...I don't see the needcity of taking his Boates up to the mouth of the Yellow Stone...I have been looking at the acts of Congress as it respects Spirits. It says there shall be no spiritous liquors introduced into the Indian Country under no pretentions...So Wine can be taken in...and I think we had better take Some." As to the ladies: "I can tell you I have not let them know but we are lords of the Western Cuntery and at the Same time told them we was Both devilish Clever fellows and Candidates for matrimony." Four holes, affecting some of the text. Sublette would not marry until 1845, and Campbell not until 1841; his bride Virginia Kyle, is mentioned in this letter. (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $6,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
171   Sublette, William, Interesting Autograph Letter Signed W.L. Sublette, 1 page, 4to, Philadelphia, February 9, 1833, to General William H. Ashley in Washington. He has not heard
from New York or Pittsburgh yet. (Sublette had sent to Pittsburgh toSublette, William, Interesting Autograph Letter Signed "W.L. Sublette," 1 page, 4to, Philadelphia, February 9, 1833, to General William H. Ashley in Washington. He has not heard from New York or Pittsburgh yet. (Sublette had sent to Pittsburgh to have two boats built for use on the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers; see previous letter to Ashley). "I did not reach this place until 3 Oclock this morning as I was Ice bound & had to take stage. I have just been & Settled with Siter Price & C...I forward you all but the Small Bill of Expencis On Jacksons Beaver and mine...I will keep it so as to Settle with Jackson On my return to Mo." (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $4,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
172   Sublette, William, Fur trade content autograph letter signed by William Sublette, Pittsburgh, February 22, 1833, to his business partner, Robert Campbell, in St. Louis. I did
not sell my furrs but Suppose they are Sold by this time...I leave hSublette, William, Fur trade content autograph letter signed by William Sublette, Pittsburgh, February 22, 1833, to his business partner, Robert Campbell, in St. Louis. "I did not sell my furrs but Suppose they are Sold by this time...I leave here this Evening with Capt. Shellcross. Mr. (Kenneth) McKenzie left here On yesterday & the American furr Compy. Boat reacht this place last night. I have just seen (Bernard) Pratt. I suppose McKenzie is bound for St. Louis. He apears trobled in mind &c. I have just purchased 2 Keel Boats but not Such Exactly as I wisht...They Came in higher than I expected to have Given...about 850 dollars the tue and Scarcely any Rigging. If they had of Been purchased when we first Ordered them I dout whether they would have Cost Over five hundred Dols but the men who had the Boats knw I was forced to purchase...The two Boats I purchased Is a Sise larger but new boats of 25 ton Each which I did not wash as I prefered about 21 ton Each..I took what I thought wthe best...My goods are nearly all On Board - I have purchased about 50 Keggs of powder here #1500 of to bacco 26 Bls flour & 11 Bles hard bread and Other small articles &c. I will purchase in Louisville about two thousand lbs of Tobacco and what alcahol we wish. The AMFC Boat Leave here on the 25th Inst for St. Louis".At the time of this letter, Sublette and Campbell were outfitting the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, the American Fur Company's chief rival. The supplies Sublette writes of were sailed up the Missouri River by his new keel boats. From there, Campbell led a caravan to the 1833 rendezvous at Green River, near the present-day village of Daniel, Wyoming. Tobacco and alcohol were both very profitable items, especially the latter. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $4,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
173   Sublette, William, Outstanding fur trade content autograph letter mentioning Ashley, Bent, Bonneville, Bridger, Cabanne, Drips, Fitzpatrick, Fontenelle, Fraeb, Gervais, Newell,
Vanderburgh, and Vasquez signed by Sublette in Fulton, MO, November 2Sublette, William, Outstanding fur trade content autograph letter mentioning Ashley, Bent, Bonneville, Bridger, Cabanne, Drips, Fitzpatrick, Fontenelle, Fraeb, Gervais, Newell, Vanderburgh, and Vasquez signed by Sublette in Fulton, MO, November 2, 1835, to Robert Campbell in Philadelphia. He writes of his recent travels in Missouri, visiting William H. Ashley and others, including Campbell's future wife, Virginia Kyle, and in Independence met the Santa Fe traders:"all of Which had done tolerable Well. They met With Scarcely any Losses. No robes came in tact But (William) Bent's...I am now at Strother Renicks Swaping horsis...and then went and look at some publick land. Then went to Lexington and Entered two hundred acres...I left for Columbia and arive there on the 30 of October where I was overtaken by Fraeb & Jarvey (Henry Fraeb & Jean Baptiste Gervais) from the Mountains. They came in With Fontinell as fair as this place. He stopt there and Cabena (J. Pierre Cabanne) is fetching down the returns Amounting to about 120 packs of Beaver & 80 of Robes traded...He Brought in 85 men from the Mountains (John Grey - Vanderburg, (Robert) Newell, (R.C.) Nelson & my. others). Fitz (Thomas Fitzpatrick) remained at the fort and (James) Bridger & (Andrew) Drips in the Mountains...The men say Fitz will be in this Winter. They met (James) Thompson as they Came down with ten men who left Andrew and Vasques (Drips & Louis Vasquez) on the South fork all Well. He said he was Going in the Sioux Cuntrey to trap...There Was many Indians at Fort William when they left...Bent & Savery (William & his business partner Marcellin St. Vrain) Returns is tolerable good... (William) Winters & Gant (John Gantt) is starting out for the Mountens and Falon (Bill Fallon) Passt here a few days...I have not any account of Boneville (Benjamin LE Bonneville)...Fontenell & Co has about forty thousand dollars to pay Out to hands that Came in...Mr. Fraeb & Jarvy Started fro St. Louis...How do you feel Dear Robert - try and marry us Both off Whilst you are On East as it a dull chance here." Some minor splitting, partly repaired, and with some seal staining. This letter is so packed full of information on so many individuals that it is essentially a who's who of major trappers of the 1835 season. Since it appears that Sublette was not at that year's rendezvous (where Fitzpatrick or Charles Larpenteur probably represented him. (imagea) (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $10,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
174   Sublette, William, Six autograph letters signed to his longtime business partner, Robert Champell, all from St. Louis or Sublettes nearby farm at Sulphur Spring, to New York,
Philadelphia, and Independence, December 12, 1835 to April 30, 1836. TSublette, William, Six autograph letters signed to his longtime business partner, Robert Champell, all from St. Louis or Sublette's nearby farm at Sulphur Spring, to New York, Philadelphia, and Independence, December 12, 1835 to April 30, 1836. These cover a heretofore uncharted time in their careers. They have sold out their posts in Missouri to the American Fur Company and also sold Fort William to one of the partnerships that sprang up after the sell-out of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company in 1834. At the time of these letters we see the two pioneering fur traders at wits' end trying to make final settlements on their former business. They have sold out to Fitzpatrick, Fontenelle & Co., run by their former field representative Thomas Fitzpatrick and the sometimes shady trader Lucien Fontenelle. That firm was involved with Pierre Chouteau Jr. & Co, which now ran the former Western Department of the AFC. These letters also show that Fort Vasquez, built by Louis Vasquez and Andrew Sublette in what is now Colorado, was begun in late 1835 and not built in 1837 as often reported in history books. Though perhaps individually less packed with content as Sublette's 1832-33 letters, these form an impressive small archive in their own right. (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $11,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
175   Sublette, William, A good pair of letters from February 1836, both to Robert Campbell in Philadelphia. The first, from the 9th, has wonderful content about a bill due from
Lucien Fontenelle and Tom Fitzpatrick, about which he spoke to John B. SarSublette, William, A good pair of letters from February 1836, both to Robert Campbell in Philadelphia. The first, from the 9th, has wonderful content about a bill due from Lucien Fontenelle and Tom Fitzpatrick, about which he spoke to John B. Sarpy of the American Fur Co. "It appear like Fontinell has Got the whip hand in Some Way from what I can learn in Setling up Vanderburgs Business in the mountains." William H. Vanderburgh had been killed in 1832 while leading one of the AFC's brigades in the Rockies. He also talks of Henry Fraeb, the Provost brothers, and his own brother Milton Sublette. He adds that Henry Sibille brought a Cheyenne Indian (to Fort William) to See the Sioux about making peace. In the second, from the 25th, he has still not been satisfied about the Fontenelle debt, and that he said he and Campbell would do no business at all until paid. It seems Fonetelle and Pierre Chouteau want Milton to accompany them despite having a leg amputated, "His Calk legg has Just come On but it wants Considerable alteration." Presumably the leg was cork. Milton would go out west that year, but would become ill, probably due to his leg, and would never return. (imagea) (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $5,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
176   Sublette, William, Excellent business content Autograph Letter signed W.L. Sublette, Sulphur Springs, MO, and St. Louis February 27 and 29, 1836 (though probably misdated, as
it bear an April 28 postmark). He writes Robert Campbell at Gill CampbSublette, William, Excellent business content Autograph Letter signed W.L. Sublette," Sulphur Springs, MO, and St. Louis February 27 and 29, 1836 (though probably misdated, as it bear an April 28 postmark). He writes Robert Campbell at Gill Campbell & Co in Philadelphia, "On the morning of the 26th Sarpey came to Miltons room and requested me to Come to the office and get the two thousand Dollar Check as I wrote...they had promist me On Cabene's (Jean-Pierre Cabanne) note. I...got the Check...which I here Enclose. There was nothing more Said about Fontinelle Fitzpatrick & Cosnote ... The American fur Co. has got all his papers but Cant make any thing out of them without his asistance and he Cant leave off Frolicking for two days to arainge them. Milton apears anxious to have Every thing Setled and Keeps Verry Steady him & Henry Fraeb. There is not much doubt but Fitzpatrick will be down Shortly from what Sarpey tells me. The American Fur Co. appears determined to doe nothing more for Fontinelle, and I can't blame them much...." He adds on the 28th (which he dates as 29th) "Mr. Fitzpatrick arive here ... I enquired about Vasques & Sublette. He had no account of them since Sebille left them On the South fork of the Platte before they Comence there fort. It apears like Sibille made a faint Efort to return...Says he hired the man he Brought With him...He agreed to Give him four hundred Dollars pr year and he Says he thought he was Only doing his duty...as we agreed with Fontinell not to Send in the Cuntrey. I told him...he was not Justafiable in hiring Sebille...We had recommended them to goe to the South fork to keep down Oposition...In Stead of Keeping down Oposition he was pitching it On...I have been in Fitzpatricks Company but five minutes & have talk Verry plain to him. I told him Fontinell promis things to us which he had not fulfiled &c...I will push the arangemt. of Our Note and if they don't agree to pay it I will then make arangemt. for the Mountains." Sublette and Campbell had begun among the original group of men sent fur trapping by William Ashley, and quickly realized that all the money was on the St. Louis end of the venture. They formed the Sublette & Campbell Company, whose principal business was supplying trappers. Fontenelle would soon be working for the American Fur Company, like many traders who tried to go into business on their own. From his business practices as mentioned here, it is not terribly surprising. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $5,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
177   Sublette, William, Great content autograph letter mentioning Jedediah Smith signed by Sublette in St. Louis to Pratte & Chouteau in the same city, carried privately, November
12, 1836. Mr. (Thomas) Fitzpatrick is about to leave for the Rocky MSublette, William, Great content autograph letter mentioning Jedediah Smith signed by Sublette in St. Louis to Pratte & Chouteau in the same city, carried privately, November 12, 1836. "Mr. (Thomas) Fitzpatrick is about to leave for the Rocky Mountains and I wish to write my brother respecting his affairs...Will you be good enough to give me a statement of the amount Fontinelle & Drips turned in in goods Horses &c and also of the debts they Rcved...Therre is a debt which you are aware of due by Fitzpatrick Sublette and (Jim) Bridger to J(edediah) S. Smith Dec'sd amounting to Some 2600$. This amount Mr. Smith Admin. is willing to wait for in Case you assume the payment. I would be pleased to know if you will settle this amount as he has anoiyed me much on the subject...Mr. Fitzpatrick intends leaving on the Boonvilled which will be in a day or two." The present letter shows the aftermath of the death of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company in 1834. Its major partners, including Fitzpatrick, Bridger, and Milton Sublette, were now doing business with their erstwhile competitors at the American Fur Company, including Pratte & Chouteau as well as Fontenelle and Drips. The RMF men had purchased the company from Jed Smith, William Sublette, and David Jackson, most likely the source of the debt discussed here. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $4,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
178   Tillton, William P., Exceptional content autograph letter signed from Galena, IL, March 24, 1830. Leaf is postmarked and rated 25c, forwarded with additional 10c due, it is
addressed to Washington, DC. Tillton writes to his father, Daniel, in LeeTillton, William P., Exceptional content autograph letter signed from Galena, IL, March 24, 1830. Leaf is postmarked and rated 25c, forwarded with additional 10c due, it is addressed to Washington, DC. Tillton writes to his father, Daniel, in Leesburg, Virginia:"It may seem strange to you that after residence of Eleven years in this western country...risking my life & health for gain that I should still be so poor, but such is the fact and to account for it I will give you a sketch of...the last Eleven Years. The first 3-1/2 years I spent in St. Louis as a clerk principally in an auction house...I received a salary for my services of $400 and board, this just about paid my expenses...I associated myself with five other young men like myself, obtained a credit for about $20,000 worth of Indian goods and went into the Indian country.""In this business I spent five years returning every spring to St. Louis with my peltries for supplies. We traded on the Upper Missouri as high as the Yellow Stone - on the Upper Mississippi above the falls of St. Anthony and up the St. Peters to its source...The last year we returned to St. Louis, furs and peltries to the amot. of $90,000, yet...we wound up our business at the end of five years with a loss of $2000 per share, this was owing to the great opposition in prices we had to contend with in the Am. Fur Co. together with a loss in one Spring...by the rise of the Missouri River of about $10,000. I settled my $2000 by a note of hand due now in two years...Forming a co-partnership with a Mr. (Lemon) Parker came to Fever River (Galena) about 2-1/2 years ago and my usual bad fortune has attended me here...in consequence of the great...depreciation to the price of Lead."The Columbia Fur Company had been formed by Tillton with former employees of the Hudson's Bay and North West Companies who had been displaced when those two companies merged. Astor bought them out in 1827 and their territory became the Upper Missouri Outfit of the American Fur Company. Tillton had been president of the CFC because many of his partners were Canadians and thus barred from trading with Native Americans in the United States. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $1,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
179   Tillton, William P., Document signed, Galena, Illinois, December 1830, also signed by William Bennet. It reads in part:The undersigned, appointed by County Commission Court to
Record a road commencing at Galena to intersect the Apple River RoaTillton, William P., Document signed, Galena, Illinois, December 1830, also signed by William Bennet. It reads in part:"The undersigned, appointed by County Commission Court to Record a road commencing at Galena to intersect the Apple River Road...We Report that the Road shall cross (Maker's?) Branch near John L. Miller at the present from thence by the present trace past … and cross Small Pox Creeek near J. Biletty's..." With an undated hand-drawn map of a road from Galena to Ogee's Ferry on the Rock River, showing features intersecting the road, including creeks and branches of rivers. Map with corner missing. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $550.00
Will close during Public Auction
180   Tillton, William P., Pair of letters from Tillton from Fort Gibson, Indian Territory (now Oklahoma) to William Hempstead, a merchant in St. Louis. The first has a manuscript
August 20 (1835) Fort Gibson postmark and rate the second was carried bTillton, William P., Pair of letters from Tillton from Fort Gibson, Indian Territory (now Oklahoma) to William Hempstead, a merchant in St. Louis. The first has a manuscript August 20 (1835) Fort Gibson postmark and rate; the second was carried by hand. The first, from August 15, 1835, laments that he is:"The most unlucky, miserable poor devil in the world ...The only favor God ever did me he has taken away...I have lost the best, the kindest, the most affectionate and the most noble of Womankind...You have not the most distant idea of such a loss and God grant you never may have." He has been doing decent business, however, and expects to net $30,000."The following July he sends in a check drawn on him for $5,000 "from my profits and advised March of the same telling him I had use for it. I do not wish it placed to my credit on your books because I do not care he should know what I wanted of it." He adds that Hempstead should earn interest from it if he can, and that if Tillton dies, to credit it to his mother in Maine. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $400.00
Will close during Public Auction

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