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EXPLORATION AND WAR continued...

THE AMERICAN FUR TRADE continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
181   Valle, Felix, Pair of autograph letters signed by the early fur trader. Both are written from St. Genevieve, MO to Peter Lorimier, first at the Currant River and then at Port
Deposit, 1820 and 1824. In the first, he has received Lorimiers letterValle, Felix, Pair of autograph letters signed by the early fur trader. Both are written from St. Genevieve, MO to Peter Lorimier, first at the Currant River and then at Port Deposit, 1820 and 1824. In the first, he has received Lorimier's letter by the "indian Messenger. We send you two kegs of powder. The money that you had sent, you will also receive by the same. One fine comb, one coarse comb, and 1/2 lb Borax which we had a great deal of trouble in getting. Peter Menard Junr. is expected here every day. All Mr. Menard's family and himself are well." The second letter, endorsed "Parish Brown's Cart Driver" concerns some deer skins that had come to St. Genevieve by cart. Some of them were damaged, perhaps in transit. He has not yet found their price, but "The probability is that they will not be worth as much as last year. The prospect for Skins generally appears dull, except the Otter Skins which are still in demand." The Valles were one of St. Genevieve's wealthiest families; Felix's home is now a popular historical site there. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,300.00
Will close during Public Auction
182   [American Fur Company: Vanderburghs Death] Interesting autograph letter signed by John Catron to Robert Campbell in St. Louis. He explains that Wm. H. Vanderburg the clerk of
the American Fur Co. drew a Bill of Exchange on P[ierre] Choute[American Fur Company: Vanderburgh's Death] Interesting autograph letter signed by John Catron to Robert Campbell in St. Louis. He explains that "Wm. H. Vanderburg the clerk of the American Fur Co. drew a Bill of Exchange on P[ierre] Chouteau Agt for said Company in favour of George Ennis for the sum of $473.50...for furs my Brother [Minatree Catron] sold to the Am. Fur Copy...with the instructions to pay me the money. Mr. Chouteau has refused payment and the Bill is returned protested...Ennis informs me that you had a draft or Bill...drawn by same Vanderburgh as clerk of Am Fur Co on same Chouteau for a large amount" and wants to know if Chouteau protested that, too. Vanderburgh had become one of the AMF's top men in the Western Department, running its trapping operations with Andrew Drips. They had recently been chasing Tom Fitzpatrick and his men through Blackfoot country. The day after this letter was written, Vanderburgh and a handful of trappers were ambushed by about a hundred Blackfeet. He and one other man were killed. Vanderburgh's body was never found. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $550.00
Will close during Public Auction
183   Wilson, William, Delightful autograph letter signed by William Wilson, St. Louis, April 23, 1843, to his mother in Glasgow, Scotland. With integral address leaf with St. Louis
postmark, 25c rate and Glasgow arrival postmark:I have engaged as CWilson, William, Delightful autograph letter signed by William Wilson, St. Louis, April 23, 1843, to his mother in Glasgow, Scotland. With integral address leaf with St. Louis postmark, 25c rate and Glasgow arrival postmark:"I have engaged as Carpenter for 15 months. Is a coarse but Healthy life. I am going up to the Rocky Mountains with the American Fur Company. I will only have $10 pr. month but I am takeing up a lott of Jewelry Beads & Ribands to traid with the indians on my own account - by which I expect to make a little. The Company will start on the Omega steamer tomorrow. We will call on all the Differnt towns and Forts on the Missouri River, saill up as farr as it is Navigable that is 5 miles up the Yellow Stone River, about 2000 miles then on mules, I expect above one thousand miles through the Diffrent Indian Nations. Feed on Nothing but Gufflo Meet 3 times a day."With a wonderful original drawing at the top of the first page, showing a man driving oxen that pull a Conestoga wagon. It seems young Wilson has been on the trail before, for he includes a grave, an all-too-familiar sight on the way west. With a second letter by Wilson, now settled in Jackson County, Iowa, to his mother and brother in Scotland. He has married and become a wheat farmer. There has been a crop plagued by wheat rust, and times are tough, but he invites his mother and brother to come out and he will build them a home. During Wilson's trip up the Missouri on the Omega, his most renowned fellow passenger was naturalist John James Audubon. Indians fired on the boat, during which time a Scottish passenger who was asleep in his berth was awakened in terror when the bullet entered his cabin. Could that Scot have been William Wilson? (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
184   [American Fur Trade before 1830] Excellent group of 17 letters and documents concerning the American fur trade, including the American Fur Company, letters from JJ Astor & Son, George Davenport (LS), Auguste Chouteau, Joseph Robidoux II, Ramsay Crooks (DS), and others, all from the years 1797-1829. Est. $3,000-4,000

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
185   [American Fur Trade, 1830s] Interesting group of 11 letters and documents concerning the heyday of the fur trade in the American West, 1831-39. The names represented include Joshua Pilcher, Baptiste Roy, WL Sublette, and HL Dousman, with items to P Chouteau and K McKenzie. Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
186   [American Fur Trade, 1840s] Valuable and interesting group of 9 letters and documents from the years 1840-49, when the fur trade was thinning out and only the strong were able
to survive. Names present include Kenneth McKenzie, P. Chouteau Jr, HH[American Fur Trade, 1840s] Valuable and interesting group of 9 letters and documents from the years 1840-49, when the fur trade was thinning out and only the strong were able to survive. Names present include Kenneth McKenzie, P. Chouteau Jr, HH Sibley, and others. Very much worth perusal! With an important Map: Hydrographical Basin of the Upper Mississippi River... JN Nicollet, 1843. About 38" x 32". Backed with linen. Splits in paper but not linen. In a modern case. (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $3,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
187   [American Fur Trade: post-1850] Select group of 20 documents and letters from the later years of the American fur trade, 1852-70. Includes receipts on Robert Campbell & Co. (including for Hugh Campbell's tuition), a note signend by John B. Sarpy, an account of the Campbells with Siter, Price, & Co., a letter from a new clerk for the Sioux and Winnebago Fur Co., and four announcements of the bankruptcies of Campbell's debtors. Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $500.00
Will close during Public Auction
188   [Dakota Trader's Ledger, 1869-73] Unusual trader's journal from "Papineauville," probably Papinaville, Dakota Territory, covering September 1869 to January 1873. Folio, in original leather and suede. The trader appears to have run a kind of saloon, for he sells "drinks" and "supper" among candles, flour, bacon, gallons of whiskey, calico, canned peaches, coffee, apples, tobacco, buffalo robes, sugar, crackers, soap, and other groceries. Wear to cover and edges, and stains on endpapers. Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,300.00
Will close during Public Auction
189   [1830 Rendezvous, Campbell, Fitzpatrick, and Sublette] Exceptional triple autograph item while at the 1830 rendezvous. An Autograph Document Signed Thos. Fitzpatrick  agt
Smith Jackson & Sublette, 1 page, oblong 8vo, Wind River, (present-day[1830 Rendezvous, Campbell, Fitzpatrick, and Sublette] Exceptional triple autograph item while at the 1830 rendezvous. An Autograph Document Signed "Thos. Fitzpatrick / agt / Smith Jackson & Sublette," 1 page, oblong 8vo, Wind River, (present-day Wyoming), July 28, 1830. Issued at that year's rendezvous, Fitzpatrick writes that "As a settlement of all acct. up to this date with (Martin?) Irroquois there appears a ballance due by us to him of fourteen hundred & fifty two dollars forty cents which we promise to pay him on demand." On the verso is an Autograph Document Signed in body by William Sublette: "Rec'd payment in full" with note in the hand of W.L. Sublette "due by Smith Jackson & Sublette … on the Watters of Columbia Aug 28th 1832" signed by Martin Sword (the Iroquois trapper to whom Fitzpatrick wrote the note) with his "X" mark. With witnessing Signature of "R. Campbell". Also docketed by clerk Henry Chouteau. Insignificant corner repair. (imagea) (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $28,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
190   [1830 Rendezvous, Fitzpatrick, McKenzie and Sublette] Autograph document signed three times by the legendary mountain man known as broken hand and once by his colleague, the
King of Missouri Kenneth McKenzie and his employer, Big Bill Suble[1830 Rendezvous, Fitzpatrick, McKenzie and Sublette] Autograph document signed three times by the legendary mountain man known as "broken hand" and once by his colleague, the "King of Missouri" Kenneth McKenzie and his employer, "Big Bill" Sublette. A pay order written at Wind River, (present-day Wyoming), August 1, 1830, on behalf of Johnson Gardner for his account with Smith, Jackson & Sublette, for $1520.73.75 (yes, three quarters of a cent). Fitzpatrick signs twice on recto and once on verso, in the latter case as agent of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company, Smith, Jackson, & Sublette's successor. Gardner signs on verso with his "X," which is witnessed by McKenzie, and Sublette writes that he has paid the balance due. Smith, Jackson, & Sublette had sold out at this rendezvous, leading to the formation of the RMF Co. (imagea) (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $14,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
191   [1832 Rendezvous, William Sublette] Important autograph letter signed by Sublette from Independence, MO, May 12, 1832, to William H. Ashley in St. Louis. He reports that he is
just about to set off for the rendezvous, but: I am about 12 days l[1832 Rendezvous, William Sublette] Important autograph letter signed by Sublette from Independence, MO, May 12, 1832, to William H. Ashley in St. Louis. He reports that he is just about to set off for the rendezvous, but: "I am about 12 days later than I expected but it has been partly Owing to the delay of my goods from St. Louis & partly...heavy rains hich has rais'd all the small Creeks on the road...I have about One hundred & 65 head of mules & horses though nearly all mules as I could not get pone that would Suit the trip. My mules Cost me from forty to fifty five Dollars Each...It took more mules than I expected...to take Out the Supplies...I have 5 yet that is Scarcely able to pack...I have hired a waggon to goe with me 4 or 5 days. I have not Lost any men Since I started from St. Louis." He gives Ashley an account of the drafts he has drawn on him and the cash he has spent out of the $4079 he began with. One interesting item is a draft for $272.62-1/2 to (Jacob) Hawkens, the St. Louis gunsmith famed for the Hawken rifle. He adds,"I had money to pay for Mr. Fitzpatrick more than I expected. .. ..I have 50 hans hired On my Own act. Mr. Campbell has five besides him self & Mr. Fitzpatrick & 4 trapers that is going Out forms our Company. There is 24 Bostonians Going On with me if they can keep up as they are On foot - They was 28 strong when they left St. Louis." Partial splitting at some folds; seal hole affecting one line. The Bostonians of whom Sublette writes included Nathaniel Wyeth, the Boston ice harvester who would travel that year overland to the Oregon Country. His route would become the Oregon Trail. That summer the rendezvous was held at Pierre's Hole, in present-day Idaho. It ended with a fierce battle between many of the mountain men and their Nez Perce friends on the one side, and the Gros Ventres on the other. (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $9,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
192 c   [1832 Rendezvous, Nathaniel Wyeth] Autograph Letter Signed by Nathaniel Wyeth. With integral address leaf datelined Two thirds the way across, July 14th 1832, carried back to
St. Louis by William Sublette, entering the mails to Baltimore with [1832 Rendezvous, Nathaniel Wyeth] Autograph Letter Signed by Nathaniel Wyeth. With integral address leaf datelined "Two thirds the way across, July 14th 1832," carried back to St. Louis by William Sublette, entering the mails to Baltimore with "St. Louis, Mo./Oct 5" datestamp and manuscript "25" rate, very fine. William Sublette, the well known Mountain Man, fur trader and explorer left the Rendezvous on July 30th or shortly thereafter, with this letter and 169 packs of beaver, he arrived in St. Louis on October 3rd.Historical letter written by Wyeth from Rocky Mountain Rendezvous in Pierre's Hole just three days before the fight with the trappers and the Blackfoot Indians which is known in history as the Battle of Pierre's Hole (Idaho). Wyeth writes: "Brother Charley I write in haste to let you know where I am, being on the head waters of South Branch Lewis River with 12 men, the rest all deserted from time to time, an then more under circumstances of peculiar vilany, the party by whom I write are moving, and I can write but little, in coming out I have lost half of my goods, and horses, and half of the residue, of my goods have gone to get more horses, we have had a most ludicras fight with the Blackfeet, no blood drawn, but I lost 4 horses. I am now through all the dangerous country, and I think I can make money here, after learning the business. I am yet in good heart and will do somthing. I must ask you to excuse my overdrawing. I was obliged to do it and trust to the lenity of my friends to overlook it - please give my respects to Mr Jarvis and my love to your good wife and all friends - tell Charley that uncle Nat is among the wild horses."The skirmish referred to in the letter took place on July 8th and it was on July 17th that the big fight with the Indians and the trappers took place in which several of Sublette's men were killed and wounded. It is not known how many Indians were killed or wounded. Wyeth's men had become discouraged and deserted from time to time including his brother Jacob and his cousin John, who later wrote on his western adventure (see lot #225). A few days after the fight, Wyeth with 11 men continued west to Fort Vancouver on the Columbia River in the Oregon country. The following year he returned to Boston after visiting the Green River Rendezvous of 1833. Here he entered into a contract with the Rocky Mountain Fur Co. to supply the rendezvous of 1834. Wyeth, Nathaniel - A. Boston merchant who spent five memorable years in the fur trade of the far west. Before going west. Wyeth was in the business of harvesting pond ice. In 1831 Wyeth became interested in the far west through the agitation by Hall J. Kelley for American occupation of the Oregon country in the late 1820's. The same year he organized the Pacific Trading Co. and by April 1832 he was back in St. Louis with a party of 23 men including his brother Dr. Jacob Wyeth, a cousin, John B. Wyeth, John Ball and 19 others. From St. Louis they traveled up the Missouri on the steamboat Otter to Independence, where they joined the annual supply caravan to the Rendezvous at Pierre's Hole under the guidance of Wmilliam L. Sublette. (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $37,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
193 c   [1832, Rendezvous, Nathaniel Wyeth] folded Autograph Letter Signed by Nathaniel Wyeth with integral address leaf datelined Other side of the Rocky Mountains July 14th 1832 from
Nathaniel Wyeth to his wife in Cambrige, Mass., endorsed fav. of W[1832, Rendezvous, Nathaniel Wyeth] folded Autograph Letter Signed by Nathaniel Wyeth with integral address leaf datelined "Other side of the Rocky Mountains July 14th 1832" from Nathaniel Wyeth to his wife in Cambrige, Mass., endorsed "fav. of Wm. L. Sublette" and carried back to St. Louis by William Sublette, entering the mails with "St. Louis, Mo./Oct 5" datestamp and manuscript "25" rate, cover with light staining and tear at upper right, fine. William Sublette, the well known Mountain Man, fur trader and explorer left the Rendezvous on July 30th or shortly thereafter, with this letter and 169 packs of beaver, he arrived in St. Louis on October 3rd."Dear Wife, In good health and spirits I have arrived here Two thirds to my journes end. Livermore and two others deserted me and stole two horses. If he cals please great him with the contempt he deserves - 7 more have deserted me since leaving me 12 men which is all I want having got through all the dangerous country - I had a bloodless skirmish with the Black feet Inds. by whom I lost 4 Horses - I have got so far with as little difficulty as I expected -You will not hear from me again for some time and this letter must be short as the party by whom it is sent must move on." (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $18,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
194   [1833 Rendezvous, Thomas Fitzpatrick] Historic Autograph Letter Signed Thos Pitzpatrick, 3 pages, 4to, River Platte, June 4, 1833. He writes to Robert Campbell in St. Louis,
carried outside the mails, possibly to Campbell within the month when[1833 Rendezvous, Thomas Fitzpatrick] Historic Autograph Letter Signed "Thos Pitzpatrick," 3 pages, 4to, River Platte, June 4, 1833. He writes to Robert Campbell in St. Louis, carried outside the mails, possibly to Campbell within the month when the latter came up to the 1833 rendezvous bearing supplies on behalf of Campbell, Sublette & Co. He recounts his actions since the previous season:"Immediately after our separation last summer I repaired to Salmon river and there made a deposit of all our goods &c. From thence to the Blackfoot country and further north in it than a company of whites ever has been before in search of beaver but found them much scarcer than I had any idea of. Our party in that section Consisted of about 60 men...Mr. (Wm. Henry) Vanderburgh overtook us with a party of 112 men on the Dearborn river which was a great disadvantage to us altho in all they caught but about 5 packs of fur while we got 20. They remained and camped with us untill we arrived at the three forks of the missouri...I went up the Gallitin and they the Madison and soon after we both had a fight with the blackfeet. Mr. Vanderburgh was killed in a few days after we parted.""(James) Bridger was shot in 2 places with arrows...Freab starts for St. Louis this morning...We have now in our service in all about ninety men and is in 2 parties...One of 60 I have under my command in this quarter and find beaver much more plenty...I left Sublette & Jervey (Jean Baptiste Gervais) in february last on the Columbia with the 30 men. How they have done I don't Know." He asks Campbell to assist Fraeb if he meets him in St. Louis and to give James Aull his candid opinion on arranging an outfit with Fitzpatrick. He asks especially that when Campbell replies: "leave nothing untold that may concern me...I have been a few nights ago fired on by indians. Two balls were shot through my lodge but no further damage done...The village is at present close by and I intend in a few days to have an interview with them after which I shall apprehend but little danger. However Should they continue hostile we are able to whip them all." Minor fold separations. This letter gives a heretofore unknown version of the rivalry between the Rocky Mountain Fur Company of Fitzpatrick, Bridger, Fraeb, Gervais, and Milton Sublette; and the American Fur Company, employing Vanderburgh and Andrew Drips, among many others. Though Fitzpatrick does not say so, he and Bridger had been followed throughout western Montana by Vanderburgh and Drips, and appear to have purposely led them into worthless areas so that the AFC could not profit by outbidding them for their trappers. The ploy worked this year, and may have inadvertently led to Vanderburgh's death, but it was a smart game for the AFC and despite taking the loss, it soon pushed the RMF out of business. (imagea) (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $30,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
195   [1833 Rendezvous, William Sublette] Excellent lengthy content letter from William L. Sublette, Grovent Village (i.e., Gros Ventres) and Mandan Village, September 25, 1833.
Writing from near the Mandan towns on the Missouri River, Campbell had r[1833 Rendezvous, William Sublette] Excellent lengthy content letter from William L. Sublette, "Grovent Village" (i.e., Gros Ventres) and Mandan Village, September 25, 1833. Writing from near the Mandan towns on the Missouri River, Campbell had returned from the 1833 rendezvous and was supervising the construction of Fort William. The two had recently separated after meeting near the confluence of the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers. Sublette had brought up supplies for the fort on two keel boats purchased the previous winter (see his letters from that period, above) and was now heading back down with the furs traded at rendezvous. There is plenty of news:"The Mandans & Grovonters have Just Maid peace with the Yancktonais...I shall take Sabille down with me to traid with the Yanktonaies. Mr. (John) Daugherty has traide upward of One hundred Roabs & Nine Beaver. They are in want of Copper Kettles here...Some Chiefs Coats say a half doz...Stone white & Blue Beads small. Some 6 Doz best Red Handle Knives...10 lbs Vermillion. Some Small Brass Wire & Some Iron wire or...Large Brass for Rist Bands...The Old man Charbino (Toussaint Charbonneau, famous as the husband of the late Sacagawea, guide to Lewis and Clark) thinks he will Want Some more powder & Ball...The Indians are determined to have a fort here...You had better send two more good working hands under Stand Rafting down here...They are in great need of a cart here...If you Could get a Bull Boat for those things to Come down in it will be Best.""The Indians apear in fine Spirits & have furnisht the Men with meat for nothing whilst they was Geting out the pickets and Say as Soon as the hunters are ready they will help down with them...There was Six of the Assiniboines here a few days Since and after Some difficulty they Smoak & maid a treaty with the grovonters. Mr. McKenzie maid a Lengthy Speach at the Mandans...& gave out the Bigg talk...They have one traider here he has traided about thirty Roabs...give these goods at the Same price as we doe excepting the amunition & they Give 70 Loads whilst we give 60...If you was to Send down two more Keggs of Powder & Ball it would not be a miss as Sabille thinks he will want it as there is Some of the Souones with the Yankctonaies...& he thinks his Supplies will fall Short." He adds that:"Mr. Daugherty is plaice here in rather an awkward Situation. The Old man Sharbino has become quite childish & has to be humored...as he has much Influence...Daugherty told him if he was not Sattisfied he might goe & he Informed the Indians he was goeing...I have Settled the matter to day & we must try & Rub out the year with the Old man...It would be well for you to Come down here when the Yellow Stone (steamboat) returns." A few days later he writes from the Mandan village that McKenzie "has told them here that you Brought down the yellow stone a Boat Load whiskey & that Our Men was drunk all the time...I will propose to McKenzie what was talk of But I think he will not take yet. If you Should sucede with him try to Get a division of the Cuntery. Keep your Eye Skind about trading Wine." Sublette had crossed out "whisky" before changing it to that last word. He also sends an account of Daugherty's business. (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $32,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
196 c   [1834 Rendezvous, Nathaniel Wyeth] Autographed Letter Signed from Nathaniel Wyeth datelined Hams Fork of the Colorado of the West, Latt 41, 45 Long 112, 35 W. June 21st 1834 to
his wife in Cambridge, Mass., address leaf endorsed J. W. and ent[1834 Rendezvous, Nathaniel Wyeth] Autographed Letter Signed from Nathaniel Wyeth datelined "Hams Fork of the Colorado of the West, Latt 41, 45 Long 112, 35 W. June 21st 1834" to his wife in Cambridge, Mass., address leaf endorsed "J. W." and entered the mails with "St. Louis/Sep 1" datestamp and manuscript "25" rate, on arrival in Cambridge it was forwarded with "Cambridge, Ms./Sep 16" datestamp and "6" rate to Saxonville then back to Cambridge with another "6" due, endorsed on reverse "Forwarded from St. Louis M by Von Phul & M Gill," fine.Before leaving the rendezvous Wyeth met Joseph Reddeford Walker and Michael S. Cerre, enroute to St. Louis with Captain Benjamin L.E. Bonneville's furs. It can be certainly assumed that Wyeth turned this letter over to Walker as per the endorsement on the lower left of the address sheet, "J.W." for Joseph Walker. (Image) Est. $3,000-4,000

SOLD for $20,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
197   [1837 Rendezvous, John McLeod] Rare content autograph letter signed by John M. McLeod, written from Fort Vancouver (near present-day Vancouver, Washington), March 4, 1838, to
chief factor John Stuart at the Hudsons Bay House in London. With DEA[1837 Rendezvous, John McLeod] Rare content autograph letter signed by John M. McLeod, written from Fort Vancouver (near present-day Vancouver, Washington), March 4, 1838, to chief factor John Stuart at the Hudson's Bay House in London. With "DEAL / SHIP LETTER" handstamp and 1 shilling, 4 pence rate, this was carried by ship from the coast and arrived in London on October 18, 1838. McLeod explains that:"In the past summer I paid a visit to the Snake Country and according to instructions again visited that Sweet Place the American Rocky Mountain Fur Company's Rendezvouse, where for 18 days I pitched my camp in company with from 2 to 300 of the Scum of all nations...The scenes committed at that place would be beyond all description. Suffice to say many of them are of a most henious nature, but what can be expected from such a set of lawless vagabonds as assembles at that place.""You will have no doubt been made acquainted with Mr. (HBC clerk John) Hutchinson's complete failure in his attempt to Establish Dease's Lake, Summer '36...The whole appears to me a total mystery. I however hope that ere long Mr. (fur trader and explorer Robert) Campbell, who volunteered his services, has thrown a more clearer view on the subject." The Robert Campbell written of here should not be confused with the important American fur trader. He would be successful at establishing the HBC post at Dease Lake in British Columbia.The 1837 rendezvous had been held on the Green River between New Fork and Horse Creek. William Drummond Stewart and his painter Alfred J. Miller were there, as well as were Jim Bridger, Kit Carson, and Andrew Drips, three legendary mountain men. That summer McLeod had purchased Fort Hall for the HBC from Nathaniel Wyeth, and it would become one of the most important posts in the frontier. With a modern print of a US survey engraving of Fort Vancouver. (imagea) (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $10,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
THE CANADIAN FUR TRADE
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
198   Statement Respecting the Earl of Selkirk's Settlement of Kildonan upon the Red River.... John Halkett. London, John Murray, 1817. 8vo, contemporary boards with label title on spine. Probably rebacked. Fold-out map detached but present. Older bookplate and Risvoldís label on pastedown. Some edge wear, light foxing, and offsetting. With the Book : The Substance of a Journal During a Residence at the Red River Colony, British North America... John West. London, LB Seeley and Son, 1824. Later 1/4 morocco with original boards. Errata page at rear. Pencil owner's note on title page, bookplate and Risvold label. Interior front hinge cracking. Exterior wear. Also with The Red River Settlement: its Rise, Progress and Present State. Alexander Ross. London, Smith, Elder & Co, 1856. 8vo, original cloth with gilt spine. Pen library note and Risvod label. Endpaper staining and damage, dampstain on front cover, upper right corner of last contents page torn out. Est. $500-750

SOLD for $700.00
Will close during Public Auction
199   [Hudsons Bay Company, York Factory Journals, 1801-1803] Extraordinary trio of manuscript diary-style journals of Occurrences at York Factory North America by John Ballanden and
then (the third book) by John McNab, from September 20, 1801 throu[Hudson's Bay Company, York Factory Journals, 1801-1803] Extraordinary trio of manuscript diary-style journals "of Occurrences at York Factory North America" by John Ballanden and then (the third book) by John McNab, from September 20, 1801 through June 8, 1803. These recount events at the main post of the Hudson's Bay Company, and are written with the governor of the company as their intended audience. All are folio, in marbled boards. The first entry gives a sample of the type of content:"1801 Sept. / 20th Sun. - Early this morning Sent...Packet on Board Ship when at the same time Mr. Staynes went on Board as Passengers from Churchill. The wind variable Severn Brig sail'd from our launch and brought up alongside the Ship in five fatham Hole. Received a note by the return of our boat from Captain Hanwell requesting two Casks of Pease which is out of my power to grant him. Have already supplied him with a Cwt. of Biscuit and sixty Gallons English Brandy. Since receiving you Honours Packet 30 Engsh. and near three hundred Inds. has been fitted out off the Cargo sent us this year from England which has reduced our stock much."In the autumn, he hunts deer and fishes tickameg (whitefish), and Native Canadians and English hunters bring in more, some from "ten shilling Creek." As winter comes on, there is much news about the frigid weather, the freezing of the river, and illness among the men and nearby Natives. The Natives get important services from the factory, including having their guns repaired, and getting food in times of difficulty, especially if they are ill or wounded. In return they bring in deer, partridges, rabbits, skins, furs, and other provisions. He reports on March 4, 1802: "A great fall of snow all last night & this Day. Men at their various jobs excepting Daniel Henry, a labourer, which came from England last year having symtums of the Scurvey upon him which if so it must be created by indolence and not for want of fresh Provision, for his year has exceede any I have ever experien'd Since I have been in the Country for being plentifully supplied with venison and at times a Days fresh Pork & Partridge."In spring, men begin coming in with their furs. On June 11, "Mr. Tate with two large canoes manned with six Englishmen arrived from Merry's House in the Bungee Country with Beaver in good Furr." The Bungee were a group of the Saulteaux people. The arrivals and departures of men, supplies, and furs is faithfully recorded, along with the weather, deaths in camp and among neighbors, and all matters important to the smooth running of the Hudson Bay Company's vital fur trade. York Factory, first founded in 1697 (but later moved), was on the southwestern shore of Hudson Bay, at the mouth of the Hayes River. It was the central headquarters of the Hudson's Bay Company's network of factories, trading and processing posts for furs brought in by native and European trappers throughout the massive watershed of the Hudson Bay, which makes up the majority of northern and central Canada and even portions of the northern United States. The present journals are from a transition period for the factory, after the company had established satellite posts in the Canadian wilds. All books with inconsequential wear, but each fully intact and all pages legible and clean. Apparently unplublished. (imagea) (imageb) (Image) Est. $15,000-20,000

SOLD for $20,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
200   [Voyageurs, 1800] A pair of early partly printed documents signed, both Montreal, Lower Canada, in French, the first December 29, 1800, engaging Prisque Cazabon with the firm
of McTavish, Frobisher & Co. for 600 livres and the second, October 24[Voyageurs, 1800] A pair of early partly printed documents signed, both Montreal, Lower Canada, in French, the first December 29, 1800, engaging Prisque Cazabon with the firm of McTavish, Frobisher & Co. for 600 livres; and the second, October 24, 1811, engages Thomas D'orlean with McTavish, McGillivrays, & Co. for 400 livres. Both in outstanding condition.If the life of a mountain man was lonely, that of the voyageurs was far worse. The lone French-Canadian trapper canoeing into the frozen unknown in search of furs helped map out and colonize the vast interior of North America. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $1,300.00
Will close during Public Auction

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