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EXPLORATION AND WAR continued...

THE AMERICAN FUR TRADE continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
141   Menard, Pierre, Autograph letter signed, in French, St. Genevieve, June 7, 1821. The famed fur trader writes to Peter Lorimier about changing their plans in relation to
business in Bellvue and with their colleague Felix Valle. Would benefit fromMenard, Pierre, Autograph letter signed, in French, St. Genevieve, June 7, 1821. The famed fur trader writes to Peter Lorimier about changing their plans in relation to business in Bellvue and with their colleague Felix Valle. Would benefit from further research and complete translation. With an ALS by Lorimier in English to Menard & Valle in St. Genevieve, from Fever River (Galena River), December 27, 1828. He wishes to make a new business arrangement with them, essentially threatening that "If we Brake up Here this Spring the loss will be Grater then you have any Eyedays". Most interesting. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $675.00
Will close during Public Auction
142   [Fort Pierre, 1835], Autograph letter signed by David D. Mitchell at Fort Pierre (opposite present-day Pierre, South Dakota), September 27, 1835. He writes Pratte, Chouteau, &
Co., St. Louis:Mr. Halsey will furnish you with a statement of all[Fort Pierre, 1835], Autograph letter signed by David D. Mitchell at Fort Pierre (opposite present-day Pierre, South Dakota), September 27, 1835. He writes Pratte, Chouteau, & Co., St. Louis:"Mr. Halsey will furnish you with a statement of all Furs and peltries traded at Fort Clark and Fort Pierre during the Summer...it being important to me that these should be credited to Outfit 1835...Mr. McKinzie will furnish you with all the news...I fear we shall experience Some inconvinience … and haveing opposition to contend with over such a wide extent of country...We are daily expecting the Sioux from the neighborhood of the Platte and Black Hills. Untill their arrival it will be difficult to come to any conclusion respecting the contemplated expedition to the South." Pratte, Chouteau & Co. had taken over the Upper Missouri Outfit from the American Fur Company when John Jacob Astor sold out the previous year. McKenzie would soon find himself out of work for having sold alcohol to the Native Americans. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $2,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
143   OFallon, John, An autograph letter signed by OFallon in St. Louis, written to Campbell in care of Wm. & D. Kyle in Richmond, Virginia. Campbell has just arrived from a trip to
Ireland and has asked about Jedediah Smith:Messrs. Smith JacksonO'Fallon, John, An autograph letter signed by O'Fallon in St. Louis, written to Campbell in care of Wm. & D. Kyle in Richmond, Virginia. Campbell has just arrived from a trip to Ireland and has asked about Jedediah Smith:"Messrs. Smith Jackson & Sublette returned last fall having brought the proceeds of a very successful hunt. They left here...about the 1st April...They have been heard from, I understand, some where NW of the Pawnees, without an accident, except the report that (partner David) had been killed, whilst separated from his party, by the Pawnees, a report that needs confirmation, & which Genl. Ashley does not believe. Sublette purchased (John) Cabane's farm 6 miles SW of this place. Jackson & Smith were anxious to be suited with farms...but I think have not purchased ….."Most likely Smith Jackson & Sublette were purchasing farms so they could raise their own provisions for rendezvous rather than buying them in St. Louis. David Jackson had not been killed by the Pawnees while traveling to Santa Fe. That misfortune had actually fallen upon one of the company's clerks. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $1,600.00
Will close during Public Auction
144   [News of Beckwourth, Bridger, and an alcoholic suicide] Outstanding content letter to Pierre Chouteau Jr & Co. in St. Louis from Honore Picotte at Fort Pierre, Iowa Territory
(now South Dakota), December 15, 1839. It becomes my painful duty to[News of Beckwourth, Bridger, and an alcoholic suicide] Outstanding content letter to Pierre Chouteau Jr & Co. in St. Louis from Honore Picotte at Fort Pierre, Iowa Territory (now South Dakota), December 15, 1839. "It becomes my painful duty to inform you of the unfortunate death of Mr. Wm. Aickson, which took place on the Tagoyo river about a month ago. He had left his post with the intention of visiting Canada and it appears commenced drinking to excess so soon as he reached the settlements...He turned back from Black Snake Hills...When the accident took place it is said he had been three days without drinking and it is a matter of conjecture whether his death was caused by the accidental discharge of his pistol or was an act of suicide. I am inclined to think it was the latter. The Post is now in charg of Mr. Gant (John Gantt)...""Buffalo are plenty and were it not for competition we might expect a good trade...Bent St. Vrain & Co have an establishment near that Post (Fort Lucien, better known as Fort Laramie) and... they have sent Beckwith (James P. Beckwourth, the famous trapper and guide) to the Crows with a considerable Outfit. I also hear that Mr. Brigier (Jim Bridger, one of the greatest of the mountain men) at the Vermillion is opposing us with goods he obtains from A.L. Papin & Co of Belleview in exchange for Peltries.""I hope Mr. Papin is now at Fort Lucien, it is long since a well assorted Outfit of Goods has been sent there to remain in charge of Mr. Sibile (of Sibille, Adams & Co.)...I sincerely hope he had long since been relieved for Mr. S. is not the man to be in charge of a large quantity of A___ (alcohol) at a time when he is surrounded by the white brigands of the mountains and three opponents to contend with in the way of Trade." With separate cover sheet. This letter corrects Jim Beckwourth's autobiography, in which he says he began working for Bent & St. Vrain in 1840. We see here that it was a year earlier. It made sense to send him to the Crows, who had adopted him a decade earlier; he would become one of their war chiefs. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,300.00
Will close during Public Auction
145   [Bernard Pratte & Co. v H. Rolette] Important manuscript legal document, Jo Daviess County, IL, November 7, 1829. A suit in which: "Bernard Pratte, Peter Chouteau Jr, Bertholmw. Berthold & Jno. P. Cabanne partners trading & doing business under the name & style of Bernard Pratte & Co. complain of H. Rolette of a plea of trespass...For that whereas the said H. Rolette...on the 15th day of May A.D. 1828, at St. Louis...To wit at Galena in the county of Jo Daviess...made his certain promissory note in writing to pay the company within thirty days $195.31 for value rec'd … " and has not paid the note despite repeated demands. H. Rolette may have been a relative of Joseph Rolette, the fur trader further north. Bernard Pratte & Co. would soon become Pratte, Chouteau, & Co. After Pratte's death in 1836, it would eventually become P. Chouteau, Jr. & Co., with partners including Cabanne as well as Pierre Menard, Felix Valle, and John Sarpy. Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $475.00
Will close during Public Auction
146   [Pratte, Chouteau & Co, Bernard Pratte] Choice autograph letter signed by Bernard Pratte, in French, from Equ qui Court (or Running Water, now Niobrara, Nebraska), to Pratte
and Chouteau, May 29, 1837. He sends the letter with independent trade[Pratte, Chouteau & Co, Bernard Pratte] Choice autograph letter signed by Bernard Pratte, in French, from "Equ qui Court" (or Running Water, now Niobrara, Nebraska), to Pratte and Chouteau, May 29, 1837. He sends the letter with independent trader Narcisse Leclerc with news:"which from any angle is of the worst nature. First, we have been short of water since the beautiful sunny summer and since then I have not done anything but 'portage'. Afterwards I have been obliged to wait for the water below Mahas (a Native American village), twice more between there and Vermillion (Post, where the Vermillion River meets the Missouri in today's South Dakota)...Having sunk the Barge with 160 lead bars, and 8 to 10 axes, our wheel arms & bucket planks; as a further blessing I have 'picote' (smallpox, of which there was a major epidemic that year) on board. This morning we have buried Vital Papin and we have 8 new cases, 2 of them since yesterday." He has been obliged to leave some supplies he was taking to Mr. Dixon, including sugar, scythes, pork, tobacco, powder, lead, and an iron kettle. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $4,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
147   Robidoux, Joseph III, Scarce Autograph Document Signed Jh: Robidoux, 1 page, small 4to, St. Louis, June 24, 1809. In French, he certifies that on the first (or fifth) of
September, 1808, when he returned from Mackinac, his father (Joseph RobidoRobidoux, Joseph III, Scarce Autograph Document Signed "Jh: Robidoux", 1 page, small 4to, St. Louis, June 24, 1809. In French, he certifies that on the first (or fifth) of September, 1808, when he returned from Mackinac, his father (Joseph Robidoux II) had sixteen piastres worth of deer skins from Alexis Lecomte, and that Lecomte has transferred the balance due to Alexander Bellesime. Also signed by a justice of the peace. Robidoux, Joseph III - French American fur trader and explorer (1783-1868); by age 16 he was going out on fur-trapping expeditions for his father, Joseph II; organized a post at Fort Dearborn, now Chicago; one of the first to settle North Omaha, NE, where he established another post; sold out to the American Fur Company and worked on their behalf; founded St. Joseph, MO. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $475.00
Will close during Public Auction
148   Robidoux, Joseph, Autograph letter signed from Cantonment (now Fort) Leavenworth, January 5, 1832. He writes in French to Jean Baptiste Sarpy in St. Louis: It is as yet
impossible for me to give you the outcome of my business. Only about one tRobidoux, Joseph, Autograph letter signed from Cantonment (now Fort) Leavenworth, January 5, 1832. He writes in French to Jean Baptiste Sarpy in St. Louis: "It is as yet impossible for me to give you the outcome of my business. Only about one third of my Indians have come out and I have approximately 80 packs but no beaver. In another eight days I hope to know more. All I can tell you is that our nephew has done important work. It is too bad that he is not alone. He has gone into partnership with a young farmer who has something that he is about to lose. I no longer believe he will come back for more." An intriguing letter; we have been unable to identify the nephew to whom Robidoux refers. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $425.00
Will close during Public Auction
149 c   Robidoux, Joseph, Autograph Letter Signed, August 31st, 1842, with integral address leaf to Pierre Chouteau who was in New York making arrangements to buy the Western Outfit at
Prairie du Chien from the American Fur Company, with manuscript BlacRobidoux, Joseph, Autograph Letter Signed, August 31st, 1842, with integral address leaf to Pierre Chouteau who was in New York making arrangements to buy the Western Outfit at Prairie du Chien from the American Fur Company, with manuscript "Blacksnake Hills/August 31st 42" postmark and matching "25" rate, internal splits and silking, fine; the only known postmark of Blacksnake Hills, Missouri.Blacksnake Hills, Missouri. In 1827 Joseph Robidoux established a trading house, at an Indian crossing on the Missouri River, at a point called by the Indians Blacksnake Hills. In November, 1842, Robidoux had surveys and plats made by Simeon Smith who named the settlement Saint Joseph in honor of its founder. St. Joe, as it is commonly called, became an important trade center and an outfitting point for miners going to California and the Rocky Mountain regions. The Post Office was established in June of 1840 as Blacksnake Hills with J.C. Robidoux, a son of Joseph, as the postmaster. The name was changed to Saint Joseph in 1844. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $450.00
Will close during Public Auction
150   Robinson, Rix, Autograph letter signed by Robinson, Grand River (near present-day Grand Haven, Michigan), April 21, 1824. He writes to Robert Stuart, the AFC agent in
Michilimackinac: I send you a man (the bearer of this) to pilot a vessel toRobinson, Rix, Autograph letter signed by Robinson, Grand River (near present-day Grand Haven, Michigan), April 21, 1824. He writes to Robert Stuart, the AFC agent in Michilimackinac: "I send you a man (the bearer of this) to pilot a vessel to this place for the purpose of transporting our packs &c to Mackinac...I am about purchasing the few Peltries and skins of Joseph Schindler which he has been able to buy with goods...He is anxious to sell.....We have had a monstrous bad winter...However we shall be able to muster a little rising of one Hundred packs of skins without counting the outfits of Pierre Coon, a handsome share of which are fine Peltries besides Sugar." Partial splitting at folds, with bottom 1/6 secured with transparent paper. With integral address leaf carried outside the mails. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $220.00
Will close during Public Auction
151   Robinson, Rix, Fur trade content autograph letter signed to Henry Sibley at Fort Snelling, dated Mackinac, August 22, 1835. With September 3 postmark and 25 rate. At the time,
Sibley was a supply agent for the American Fur Company. Robinson writeRobinson, Rix, Fur trade content autograph letter signed to Henry Sibley at Fort Snelling, dated Mackinac, August 22, 1835. With September 3 postmark and 25 rate. At the time, Sibley was a supply agent for the American Fur Company. Robinson writes:"The returns of Grand River are much as usual, to wit, hard times, and more a-coming...We have some prospect of a treaty being held with the Indians of that place next summer, when we shall all get rich...That country is beginning to attract the attention of the public, and will soon be settled. It is in contemplation to build Steamboats to run on the river the ensuing season, & from there across the lake to Chicago & Millwalkie." He gives news of the travels of George & Talbot Dousman, Ramsay Crooks, John C. Halsey, and Edward Biddle, adding that Gordon Hubbard "is worth now from $100,000 to 150,000 without doubt blundered into fortune. Why not my dear friend Henry & Hercules (Dousman) be born under that fortunate star." With additional good content. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $325.00
Will close during Public Auction
152   Rolette, Joseph, Choice early letter by Joseph Rolette, in French, to Pierre Chouteau (who has written him about money he owes Kenneth McKenzie) in St. Louis, September 11,
1829. He writes from Prairie du Chien: I can only acknowledge that aftRolette, Joseph, Choice early letter by Joseph Rolette, in French, to Pierre Chouteau (who has written him about money he owes Kenneth McKenzie) in St. Louis, September 11, 1829. He writes from Prairie du Chien: "I can only acknowledge that after having seen Mr. Moore, having heard it said...been purchased for Mr. Dickson from the Indians for an extraordinary price. Regarding Mr. (Columbia Fur Co. co-founder Joseph) Renville, a thousand piastres was the total amount that he left in my hands for this object. I am satisfied with it. Going by appearances he will need to pay me for this year's equipment. As for the materials for the mill... Last year, the equipment here earned $25,000 despite a deduction, in comparison with the preceding year, of $13,000 on the muskrats. I wrote to Mr. Astor about the troubles with the Sioux and the Fox in order that he arrange that the Secretary of War send direct orders.... If it were possible that you could procure for us a thousand gallons whiskey this fall...please do that."Trouble with the Fox Indians would soon require action of the War Department, as the Black Hawk War of 1832. Joseph Rolette had initially worked for the Mackinac Company, which was later reorganized as the South West Company with him as one of its main partners. Astor bought them out in 1815. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $850.00
Will close during Public Auction
153   Rolette, Joseph, Autograph letter signed by Joseph Rolette, Prairie du Chien, W.T., March 11, 1839. Address leaf with March 15 manuscript postmark and 25 rate. Rolette writes
to Messrs. Chouteau & McKenzie of Chouteaus Western Outfit, part ofRolette, Joseph, Autograph letter signed by Joseph Rolette, Prairie du Chien, W.T., March 11, 1839. Address leaf with March 15 manuscript postmark and 25 rate. Rolette writes to "Messrs. Chouteau & McKenzie" of Chouteau's Western Outfit, part of the American Fur Company, about two memoranda, one for Rolette "and one for J. Bte. Faribault of St. Peters to be charged to Western outfit. I mean the St. Peter M(innesota). …please add to mine Eight good Painted Buffaloe Robes." Some light foxing, otherwise in stellar condition. Rolette had once been the wealthiest man in Prairie du Chien, but the Panic of 1837 had put him in heavy debt to the AFC. When it went bankrupt in 1842, Chouteau reorganized it with Rolette as a silent partner. However, Rolette died soon afterward and his estate was absorbed by the company. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $325.00
Will close during Public Auction
154   Sarpy, John B., A good business letter to his partner and cousin, Pierre Chouteau, in New York, September 1, 1854. He writes from St. Louis, telling him fur trader William:
Bents equipment came to $3200 at good prices and my purchase of robesSarpy, John B., A good business letter to his partner and cousin, Pierre Chouteau, in New York, September 1, 1854. He writes from St. Louis, telling him fur trader William: "Bent's equipment came to $3200 at good prices and my purchase of robes...564 skins & 337 (robes) has been placed to his credit leaving a balance of 1225.83 in our favor due next Spring. Campbell has not liked seeing this change but it appears to be Bent's fault...I notice that his credit locally is very good...The day before yesterday I bought 1582 robes from Campbell...I paid top dollar but I am certain that we will make 50 net per robe, and I didn't like leaving them in the hands of our competition here. During the past week we have sold over $18000 of robes at our price." He continues, with much more solid fur trade and finance content. Sarpy would die in 1857, the same year as Chouteau's son-in-law and agent John Sanford, leaving Chouteau's businesses in a confused state. None of the vagaries of the business world could do permanent damage, and Pierre Chouteau died wealthy. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $700.00
Will close during Public Auction
155   [Sibille, Adams & Co, Fort Platte] Letter signed by JWD Hodgkiss for Sibille, Adams, & Co, Fort Platte (between the Platte and Laramie Rivers, present-day Wyoming), February
25, 1844. Hodgkiss writes to David Adams at South Fork that they have [Sibille, Adams & Co, Fort Platte] Letter signed by JWD Hodgkiss for Sibille, Adams, & Co, Fort Platte (between the Platte and Laramie Rivers, present-day Wyoming), February 25, 1844. Hodgkiss writes to David Adams at South Fork that they have "fixed the 10th day of March as the time when we shall start for the settlements" "In case of yr. having any of the water left we should prefer yr. trading horses with it, to bringing it back. The Sioux will all be with you before long." (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $2,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
156   Smith, Jedediah, Extraordinarily rare Autograph Letter Signed Jedediah S. Smith, 2 pages, 4to, St. Louis, November 24, 1830. He writes to Hugh Campbell, brother of Robert
Campbell, in Richmond, Virginia: I have been under the necessity of goSmith, Jedediah, Extraordinarily rare Autograph Letter Signed "Jedediah S. Smith," 2 pages, 4to, St. Louis, November 24, 1830. He writes to Hugh Campbell, brother of Robert Campbell, in Richmond, Virginia: "I have been under the necessity of going forward with a partnership amounting to part of My Capital, but Shall Still, unavoidable accidents excepted, have eight, or perhaps ten thousand Dollars, in March, or April next, which Could not be vested in any way to please me so well, as to have it aid both my Friend and me...I received from Mr. Kyle a price Current of Nov. 10th, together with such information as that Gentleman was able to collect...but Since I wrote, We have engaged a Gentleman (Gen. Wm. H. Ashley) to take our Furs forward to Philadelphia and N. York and dispose of Same...Mr. Keyte has now removed from St. Louis, near to a Small Town, called Chariton, in this State.""After the perusal of these two Letters, which I have had the pertinacity to write, it is hardly necessary for me to tell you that I am much more in my element, when conversing with the uncivilized Man, or Seting My Beaver Traps, than in writing Epistles." With "St. LOUIS Mo. T." postmark, December 1, and 25 rate. With some minor fold splits and light seal stains. Integral address sheet detached but present.General Ashley had sold out to Smith, William Sublette, and David E. Jackson in 1826. After Smith's death in 1831, Sublette and Robert Campbell worked with Ashley to sell furs trapped by the Rocky Mountain Fur Co. and to return with supplies to sell to the traders and trappers.Smith, Jedediah - Legendary American fur trapper, mountain man, and explorer (1799-1831); the first white man to: reach California by the overland route, climb the High Sierras, cross Nevada, and walk the length of Utah; one of "Ashley's Hundred" hired by William Ashley to trap furs in the American west; survived a grizzly bear attack that scarred his head badly; killed by Comanches in 1831 while he was searching for water when leading a caravan down the Santa Fe trail; his body was never found. Though Smith was later spoken of as "old Jed" and was certainly as hardy and wily as any other mountain man, he died at age 31. Autograph letters of his are unreported on the market in the last quarter century by American Book Prices Current. (imagea) (Image) Est. $40,000-50,000

SOLD for $57,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
157   [Smith, Jedediah] Manuscript document with secretarial signature J.S. Smith by S. Parkman. The document is to Gen. William A. Ashley, April 9, 1831, a request to pay Mrs. John
B. Smith five dollars per month for six months. With Catherine Smith[Smith, Jedediah] Manuscript document with secretarial signature "J.S. Smith" by S. Parkman. The document is to Gen. William A. Ashley, April 9, 1831, a request to pay Mrs. John B. Smith five dollars per month for six months. With Catherine Smith's receipts of payments on verso and a docket on recto by Ashley's clerk, Henry Chouteau. With an unrelated postal cover in Parkman's hand, for Smith's application to Secretary of War John Eaton to accompany a military expedition to the Rocky Mountains, March 1831. Also with a photocopy of the letter in Parkman's hand but signed by Smith, making the request (from the National Archives). (imagea) (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $425.00
Will close during Public Auction
158   [Smith, Jedediah] Two autograph letters signed by Jedediah Smiths brother, Peter Smith, Morgan City, IL, December 24, 1839, and Mount Pleasant, IA, June 23, 1842. Both are to
O.H. Fitch in Ashtabula, OH, with inquiries about Smiths accounts wit[Smith, Jedediah] Two autograph letters signed by Jedediah Smith's brother, Peter Smith, Morgan City, IL, December 24, 1839, and Mount Pleasant, IA, June 23, 1842. Both are to O.H. Fitch in Ashtabula, OH, with inquiries about Smith's accounts with him. The earlier letter also with a postscript written on the verso of the address panel, asking about the disposition of the "Brick House". (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $400.00
Will close during Public Auction
159   [Smith, Jedediah] Highly interesting autograph document signed by Samuel Parkman as agent for J.S. Smith deceased, Santa Fe, New Mexico, August 21, 1831. A second of exchange
to pay William L. Scott $1,000, drawn on General William H. Ashley in[Smith, Jedediah] Highly interesting autograph document signed by Samuel Parkman as agent for "J.S. Smith deceased," Santa Fe, New Mexico, August 21, 1831. A second of exchange to pay William L. Scott $1,000, drawn on General William H. Ashley in St. Louis. With the interesting notes at left in Novermber and December 1831 that it has been protested for non-acceptance and for non-payment, both signed by a notary. Scott had signed it over to Scott S. Harris and further paid over to Linzey P. Marshall, who, it seems, was finally paid by (John?) Smith in Santa Fe, September 10, 1833. Finally, with the docket of Ashley's clerk, Henry Chouteau, 1834. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $650.00
Will close during Public Auction
160   Stewart, William Drummond, Choice pair of autograph letters signed by the Scottish sportsman (1795-1871) whose forays into the wild American West in the 1830s became the basis
for dramatic paintings by Alfred Jacob Miller and also for his own froStewart, William Drummond, Choice pair of autograph letters signed by the Scottish sportsman (1795-1871) whose forays into the wild American West in the 1830s became the basis for dramatic paintings by Alfred Jacob Miller and also for his own frontier novels. The first, to Robert Campbell in Lexington, Missouri, in care of John Aull, is apparently sent from a boat on the Missouri River: "I was sorry to hear you had resumed your shaking habits & would strongly recommend some other religion. Take a dose of morphine when you first feel the chill & one of quinine every two hours … You will oblige me by getting me a pair of holsters as (Nelson?) has lost my old ones." The second, to Timothy B. Dix in New York, from St. Louis, November 4, 1838, sends his wish that his friend will stay put because Stewart will likely come to New York, as, "The death of my Dear Brother obliges me to return to England in spring." This letter with notable damage, some of it repaired with transparent paper.The death of Stewart's brother turned him from a former soldier and gentleman of leisure into Sir William Stewart, 19th Lord of Grandyully. Having gone to every rendezvous from 1833-38, he was now an old hand and had formed warm friendships with Campbell, William Sublette, and the other great fur traders and trappers. In 1837, he had hired Alfred J. Miller to come along and create sketches and watercolors of life on the western trails, which he later had Miller turn into full-size paintings. Letters from Stewart are quite scarce, though he is often mentioned by others. His charm in these letters gives a good sense of why he was so readily accepted by the traders, but his ability in the wilderness and with a gun are what allowed him to fit into the rough and tumble world of the mountain men. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $4,000.00
Will close during Public Auction

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