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EXPLORATION AND WAR continued...

THE WAR OF 1812 continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
41   Madison, James Document Signed James Madison as President, 1 page, oblong folio, Washington, June 22, 1814. A land grant to John H. Brinton and Isaac Bonsall for Fractional
Sections numbers Five and Six in Township number One of Range number TMadison, James Document Signed "James Madison" as President, 1 page, oblong folio, Washington, June 22, 1814. A land grant to John H. Brinton and Isaac Bonsall for "Fractional Sections numbers Five and Six in Township number One of Range number Ten...Brinton two thirds, and Bonsall one third" in the lands north of the Ohio and above the mouth of the Kentucky River (the old Northwest Territory). Also signed by Commissioner of the General Land Office Edward Tiffin, previously the first Governor of Ohio. With an exceptional impression of the Land Office wax and paper seal at lower left. Madison, James - Fourth President of the United States (1751-1836, served 1809-17); guided the nation precariously through the War of 1812. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $400.00
Will close during Public Auction
42   [Privateer Instructions, James Monroe] Pair of partly printed Documents Signed Jas. Monroe as Secretary of State, 4 pages, legal folio, June 6, 1812 and 1 page, 4to, November 7,
1812. The first is to Adoniram Allen, commanding the privateer th[Privateer Instructions, James Monroe] Pair of partly printed Documents Signed "Jas. Monroe" as Secretary of State, 4 pages, legal folio, June 6, 1812; and 1 page, 4to, November 7, 1812. The first is to Adoniram Allen, commanding the privateer the Madison and provides: "Instructions for the Private Armed Vessels of the United States: 1)...The high seas, referred to in your commission, you will understand, generally, to extend to low water mark; but with the exception of the space within one league, or three miles, from the shore of countries at peace both with Great Britain and with the United States...2) You are to pay the strictest regard to the rights of neutral powers, and the usages of civilized nations...3) Towards enemy vessels and their crews, you are to proceed, in exercising the rights of war, with all the justice and humanity which characterize the nation of which you are members..." The congressional Act authorizing letters of marque is printed. The second, to Capt. John Evans of the privateer schooner Stark, gives "Additional Instruction...The public and private armed vessels of the United States are not to interrupt any British unarmed vessels bound to Sable Island, and laden with supplies for the humane establishment of that place" Sable Island, off the coast of Nova Scotia, was the site of a life-saving station. This document is tipped to a slightly larger sheet. The June document has edge wear and some uneven toning. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $1,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
43   [The 1808 Embargo] Six letters from Thomas Mullett & Co., a London firm, to James Robertson in New York, October 1807-January 1808. Each with integral address leaf bearing
manuscript 6 port of entry ship rate. Two are identical letters of the s[The 1808 Embargo] Six letters from Thomas Mullett & Co., a London firm, to James Robertson in New York, October 1807-January 1808. Each with integral address leaf bearing manuscript "6" port of entry ship rate. Two are identical letters of the same October 26, 1807 date. One is docketed as being received on December 11, 1807 while the other, endorsed "triplicate" on front, is docketed as being received on January 27, 1808. The correspondence begins with an intriguing offer for Robertson to send 500 quarters (presumably of a hundredweight) of peas, but to do so secretly so that his neighbors do not hear of the demand and flood the London market! Insurance is getting expensive "especially on vessels from the U.S. to France & Holland .. and report says that France is UNFRIENDLY to your country."On Nov. 10, they advise him that insurance will stay high and credit will be tight until "a Treaty between our respective Nations can ever fully restore that confidence which has been so terribly shaken." By December 3, the British had issued their infamous Orders in Council announcing that they would treat neutral ships headed to French-controlled ports (without stopping in England) as hostile. Mullet & Co cautions that though:"we, with you would hope that war may not take place but our doubts on that head are so strong that we would most earnestly press it upon you to suspend all your European business. We are now at war with Russia & the Portuguese Royal Family have left for the Brazils."The last letter, from January 5, 1808, encloses a copy of Napoleon's decree (not present) regarding neutral commerce, similarly banning trade that stopped at English ports "and altho' it seems as if your direct trade to & from England, is still to be permitted, it is couched in Language of doubt." The United States retaliated to the British Acts with its own Non-Intercourse Act, which was ineffective. Eventually Napoleon relented somewhat, but before the English could repeal the Orders in Council in June 1812, the United States had declared war. Mail carried between the US and England during this period is decidedly uncommon. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $950.00
Will close during Public Auction
44 c   [Battle of Tippecanoe] and the New Madrid, Missouri earthquake, folded letter with integral address leaf to Meadesville, Pa. with manuscript Hamilton, Ohio5th April 1812
postmark, written 99 days after the great earthquake at New Madrid on the[Battle of Tippecanoe] and the New Madrid, Missouri earthquake, folded letter with integral address leaf to Meadesville, Pa. with manuscript "Hamilton, Ohio/5th April 1812" postmark, written 99 days after the great earthquake at New Madrid on the Mississippi River on 16 December, 1811 and 87 days before the War of 1812 was declared, the Indian "Engagement" mentioned in the letter was the battle of Tippecanoe on 7 November, 1811, cover with some toning and age spots, fine.Under the dateline "Hanover Township Buttlet County Big Miami Near Fort Hamilton March the 23 1812" the sender writes: "...the Earthquakes Down the Missisipa have done Some Considerable Dammage to the River and Made the Navigation Difficult by the Banks falling in and Some Islands Sunk with a small town called New Madrid … we have had more shakes this winter … there was some Disturban(ce) Betwen the Indians and the White People last fall - they Came to an Engagement in which the Indians whare beatten and many killed and wounded - there Town (Prophetstown) taken and A great Deal of Corn burnt by the White people - the Indians blame their prophet (The Prophet, brother of Tecumseh) for the Disturbance and have promised to Delliver him up to the whites - there is no appearance of war now but many on the fronters are very much afraid... Peter Lintner"The Battle of Tippecanoe has been called the opening battle of the War of 1812, because it strengthened the alliance of the Indians with England and convinced the British of the need to inflame the Indians against the Americans. The day after the battle the army under General Harrison plundered Prophetstown and applied the torch to the town. On December 14, 1811, John Bradbury, an English botanist, arrived at New Madrid. Mo., in a flatboat. He described the settlement as being "some flimsy houses around a bare plain, and bought supplies in the town's two shabby stores." New Madrid was destroyed on Dec. l6th by the most devastating earthquake to ever hit mid America. The convulsions that followed actually reversed the flow of the Mississippi River, destroying everything in its path and changing the geographical course of the river. New Madrid and Little Prairie, 30 miles below, were virtually wiped off the face of the earth. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $1,200.00
Will close during Public Auction
45   [Declarations of War and Peace] Three printed items and one document concerning the declaration of war or the negotiations for peace. Includes Declaration of War. James Madison.
Washington, 1812. 8vo, 24 pages, no wraps. String bound. Pri[Declarations of War and Peace] Three printed items and one document concerning the declaration of war or the negotiations for peace. Includes Declaration of War. James Madison. Washington, 1812. 8vo, 24 pages, no wraps. String bound. Printed as "Important State Papers," explaining that "The injunction of secresy [sic] was about an hour ago removed from the following Message, Report, and Act," and then gives the text of the declaration of war on June 19, 1812. Minor dampstains throughout. With an interesting British broadside issuing the "Proclamation" by George Stracey Smith, commander in chief of New Brunswick, stating that:"Whereas .. the United States of America...has declared War against the United Kingdom.....to order and direct all His Majesty's Subjects, under my Government, to abstain from molesting the Inhabitants...and on no account to molest the goods or unarmed Coasting or Fishing Vessels belonging to the defenceless Inhabitants upon the Frontiers, so long as they shall abstain on their parts from any such acts of hostility and molestation towards the Inhabitants of this Province, and of the Province of Nova-Scotia." Modern archive stamp at top right, some foxing. With Message from the President of the United States Transmitting Communications from the American Ministers at Ghent..." Madison, Adams, et al. Washington, A & G Way, 1814. 8vo, 74 pages, no boards. The American ministers - John Quincy Adams, James A. Bayard, Henry Clay, Jonathan Russell, and Albert Gallatin, were at the time of this message (December 1) less than ten days away from finishing their negotiations, the letters that President Madison forwards being already more than a month old. Finally, with a manuscript document, March 13, 1815 (but misdated 1814), a receipt for payment to Joseph Currier for "Ringing 28 Bells from Mch 16th 1814 to January 16th 1815 for Towp. Meetings - $3.50" but also for "Ringing Bell for Peace - $1.50." Currier signs in receipt of his $5. (imagea) (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $1,300.00
Will close during Public Auction
46 c   [War of 1812 Declared] America declares war on Great Britain, June 19, 1812, extremely fine printed letter with copy of Royal Order of 31st July, 1812 to Providence, R.I. with
New HavenSep 19 entry datestamp, matching SHIP handstamp and 14[War of 1812 Declared] America declares war on Great Britain, June 19, 1812, extremely fine printed letter with copy of Royal Order of 31st July, 1812 to Providence, R.I. with "New Haven/Sep 19" entry datestamp, matching "SHIP" handstamp and "14 1/2" rate, datelined "Liverpool, 4th August, 1812" the first lines of which read: "The American Declaration of War was received here on the 31st ult. and the next morning an order was received for the detention of all American vessels." The letter also reprints the Royal Order "...that no ships or vessels belonging to any of his Majesty's subjects be permitted to enter and clear out for any of the ports within the territories of the United States of America,..." (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
47   [Privateers in the War of 1812] A lot of 9 letters and documents by agents, lawyers, officials, and interested parties, all concerning seizures of ships and (in one case) depredations from the War of 1812, with one related book. The earliest document, from August 22, 1812, is in regard to the privateer Madison, which has captured the British brigantine Anna, and seeks a judgment on the brig as a lawful prize (which is granted). From that November comes a power of attorney granted by J. Simeon Metcalf, a New York sailor and captain of the ship Fox, which was attacked by another private American vessel, the York Town, resulting in Metcalf being taken prisoner! One interesting letter from the Treasury Department requests of Collector William Lee, about $4,813.29 he received "for duties on the cargo of the prize vessel called the Bothnia, and your reasons for not having as yet introduced these duties in your accounts." Since the judgment on that vessel was overturned by the US Supreme Court, a third of that money must be returned. Condition is generally superior. With the Books: Report of the Select Committee...to inquire into the expediency of amending the act of 3d March 1817...authorizing payment for property lost, captured, or destroyed, by the enemy, during the late war. Washington, 1824. No wraps. Document 1 of the 18th Congress, 2nd Session. Minor dampstaining. And History of the American privateers and Letters-of-Marque, During our War with England... G. Coggeshall. NY, Coggeshall, 1856. Contemporary blue cloth with gilt design, spine, and edges. Exterior rubbed, extremities foxed. Est. $500-750

SOLD for $675.00
Will close during Public Auction
48   [Prisoners of War in Indian captivity, Henry Clay] An important letter by Speaker of the House of Representatives Henry Clay, to Secretary of War William Crawford, putting
pressure on him to give concrete instructions for reclaiming prisoners cap[Prisoners of War in Indian captivity, Henry Clay] An important letter by Speaker of the House of Representatives Henry Clay, to Secretary of War William Crawford, putting pressure on him to give concrete instructions for reclaiming prisoners captured by Native Americans at the Siege of Ft. Meigs and at the River Raisin Massacre. Autograph Letter Signed "H. Clay" as Speaker of the House, 1-2/3 pages, 4to, Washington, December 26, 1815. To Secretary of State Crawford he pens:"There is reason to believe that some of the prisoners taken by the Indians, in the battles of the river Raisin and at Fort Meigs, may be yet held in captivity. These tribes are supposed to have come from towards or perhaps beyond the head of Lake Superior. It is known to be the practice of the Indians to divide amongst their several tribes the Captives. Some of our prisoners may have been carried away by remote tribes and yet remain in bondage. ….."Clay cites the case of Kentuckian Charles Postlethwait, captured at Ft. Meigs, whom sources suggest is still held captive. Discoloration at lower right of first page, with lower right corner of blank integral page torn away. Fine.With the Book: Message from the President of the United States Relating to the Alleged Encouragement by the British Government of the Indians to Commit Depredations. James Madison. Washington, A and G Way, 1812. 24 pages, possibly incomplete, disbound but with front wraps. Henry Clay (1777-1852) - US Secretary of State under John Quincy Adams; a powerful US Senator and US Representative from Kentucky. Clay was the cousin of General Green Clay, whose Kentucky troops took the brunt of the fighting at Ft. Meigs, as detailed in the WH Harrison letters (Lot 38). (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $2,200.00
Will close during Public Auction
49   [Blount orders kettles for Andrew Jackson] Willie Blount Scarce war-related Letter Signed Willie Blount as Governor of Tennessee, 13 page, 4to, Nashville, November 26, 1812. He
writes to B. Lewis, a quartermaster in the same city, directing hi[Blount orders kettles for Andrew Jackson] Willie Blount Scarce war-related Letter Signed "Willie Blount" as Governor of Tennessee, 1/3 page, 4to, Nashville, November 26, 1812. He writes to B. Lewis, a quartermaster in the same city, directing him to "use your discretion in purchasing Camp Kettles for the use of the Tennessee volunteers under the command of Genl. Jackson; it would be most desirable to be enabled by choice to get such as the law requires, but as that is impracticle to do here in time for the accommodation of those Troops whose immediate march is indispensible, you doubtless had best procure tin ones of the description you mention."Partial separation at two folds, small piece out at right (probably from seal) affecting one word. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $850.00
Will close during Public Auction
50   [American Surrender of Detroit] Historic Document Signed by Brigadier General Duncan McArthur, 5 pages, legal folio (4 pages) and 4to (on a separate sheet), Pendleton, Kentucky,
October, 1814. His deposition in the matter of Genl. James Taylor[American Surrender of Detroit] Historic Document Signed by Brigadier General "Duncan McArthur," 5 pages, legal folio (4 pages) and 4to (on a separate sheet), Pendleton, Kentucky, October, 1814. His deposition in the matter of Genl. James Taylor v. John Leathers, a suit brought in response to Leath's claims that Taylor had acted not just negligently, but also treacherously, in the surrender of Detroit. After establishing that McArthur served with Taylor under Genl. William Hull at Detroit, the deposition, in the usual question-answer form, continues:"2) Question: Will you state the capacity in which each of you acted on said campaign - I commanded the v. Regt. of Ohio Volunteers and was considered second in command and Genl. James Taylor acted as Quarter Master Genl. to the Western army & Pay master to the ohio troops ...5_ Question: Did not...Taylor warmly recommend Genl. Hull's going on to Malden (Fort Malden, across the Detroit river in Amherstburg, Canada) at all the councills? Answer: To the best of my recollection, he did, and at other times often arged the propriety of making an immediate desent on Malden both to the commanding Genl. & many of the other officers...6) Question: Did not...Taylor oppose the retreat of Genl. Hull from Canada? Answer: To the best of my recollection, he did. 7) Did...Taylor not come once...after the return from Canada and State to you all...that Genl. Hulls conduct was not correct and that from a conversation with him that he thought he (Hull) would dissapoint all our reasonable expectations...that he expected to be attacked by a Host of Indians, North West company men, and British and yet would not consent to write Governor [Charles] Scott of Ky for reinforcements...?" McArthur affirms that Taylor did so. "Did not the said Taylor make a proposition to take the command from Genl. Hull and give it to you?" McArthur names another officer as the source of that suggestion, but notes that Taylor agreed. He also confirms that Taylor sent a letter, which McArthur also signed, to Gov. Scott asking for reinforcements. Subscribed by two justices of the peace. First four pages with bottom 1/10 nearly separated, and with two splits repaired. Genl. James Taylor was one of the founders of Newport, Ky, which benefited greatly from his position as quartermaster, as he was able to make the town a supply hub. John Leathers was taking on not only one of Kentucky's richest men, but also one who was very well connected: among his cousins were sitting President James Madison and future President Zachary Taylor. Duncan McArthur was a man of substance as well. After being captured at Detroit (as militia, his men were instantly paroled to their homes) he was exchanged and then served under William Henry Harrison. When Harrison resigned in 1814, McArthur became commander of the Army of the North-West; he was later Governor of Ohio. As we see here, the officers under William Hull were nearly at the point of mutiny in response to his defeatism. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $2,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
51   [William Hull Surrenders Detroit] Intriguing Autograph Fragment Signed Wm. Hull, 2 pages, 12mo, on an irregular sheet, no date or place. He writes to Elisha Whittlesey:had recd
no information (of) war having been declared, and on the 1st of[William Hull Surrenders Detroit] Intriguing Autograph Fragment Signed "Wm. Hull," 2 pages, 12mo, on an irregular sheet, no date or place. He writes to Elisha Whittlesey:"had rec'd no information (of) war having been declared, and on the 1st of July had no Idea that war was declared. I received the information on the 2d of July. I do not know precisely when it was received at Malden, but it was some days before I received it. It is known that Capt. Chapin was at Malden, the day before, his vessel was chartered at the Miami, that he knew then that war was declared. If so, being an American, he ought to be punished instead of being paid. I have however no positive evidence, only circumstantial ... and he could not been there, without be informed of it. That he refused to keep the west shore, although, I advised or directed him to. If you desire it, I will give my affidavit, of the contract, with these circumstances."Edges chipped, affecting text, which clearly originally extended above the current top of the sheet. Small strip attached to left edge of first page with seal. The first hostile action in the War of 1812 was the capture of the packet ship Cuyahoga, which was taking supplies to meet Genl. William Hull in Detroit. On July 2, the boat's captain, Luther Chapin, allowed six Canadians in a longboat to board the ship and seize it. The seizure was a disaster for the Americans, for in addition to supplies and some ill soldiers, the ship carried copies of all of Hull's correspondence with Secretary of War. The British knew the size and disposition of Hull's forces and their plans for the near future. They besieged Fort Detroit in mid-August and Hull surrendered after two days. He was court-martialed for his actions and convicted, but President James Madison gave him a reprieve before he was to be shot. With Newspaper: Federal Republican, and Commercial Gazette, vol. VI, No. 862, Georgetown, DC, September 7, 1812. Includes a British Account of the capture of Detroit, and General Hull's army, by capitualation on the 16th of Aug. 1812. (imagea) (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $550.00
Will close during Public Auction
52 c   [USS Wasp vs. HMS Folick] A long and interesting letter, with address leaf, datelined November 1th 1812 includes: ...Our Sloop Wasp of 16 guns fell in with the (British) Frolick
a sloop of 20 guns - the Wasp dismasted Frolick killed[USS Wasp vs. HMS Folick] A long and interesting letter, with address leaf, datelined "November 1th 1812" includes: "...Our Sloop Wasp of 16 guns fell in with the (British) Frolick a sloop of 20 guns - the Wasp dismasted Frolick killed & wounded between 50 & 60 and took her and was making for port but a (British) bull dog took them both and sent them to Bermuda - Capt. Jones commanded the Wasp he had but 5 killed after an engagement of 42 minutes..."The Wasp was a 450 ton US Sloop-of-War, mounting sixteen 32 pound carronades, commanded by Captain Jacob Jones. The Frolic was a British Sloop-of-War, also mounting sixteen 32 pounders, commanded by Captain Thomas Whinyates. The engagement took place on October 18, 1812, lasting less than an hour, with both vessels badly damaged, but the Frolic struck her colors and surrendered with a loss of about 90 killed or wounded. Shortly after a British ship-of-war Poictiers showed up and captured both vessels. They were taken to Bermuda where the American prisoners were exchanged. The Wasp was kept as a prize of war, re-outfitted and renamed, by the British Navy.In the letter Jones says he has nothing more until "I return with the mail from Clifton." The letter was endorsed to be carried by "Ensign Hale." (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,200.00
Will close during Public Auction
53 c   [The Battle of Fort Meigs] Descriptive folded letter carried by Major Chambers to the senders wife, Mrs. Sparkman in Queenstown, Canada, age spotting and splits along the folds,
fine.Under the dateline Amherstburgh 17th May 1813 Jon Sparkman d[The Battle of Fort Meigs] Descriptive folded letter carried by Major Chambers to the sender's wife, Mrs. Sparkman in Queenstown, Canada, age spotting and splits along the folds, fine.Under the dateline "Amherstburgh 17th May 1813" Jon Sparkman describes the British efforts to take Fort Meigs from the Americans: "...On the 24th of April our Troops &c Commanded by General Proctor left this place on an expedition to the Miamis where they arrived safe without molestation at the old British Fort (Miami) - The Yankee fort (Meigs) being about 1 1/2 miles above, on the opposite side of the River, by the 30th we had all our Guns up and Batteries fixt at a distance of 800 yards and the cannonading commenced from our different batteries which consist of Two 24 Pounders, Two 12 Pod. Two 6 Pod. one 8 Inch Howitzer - one 5 inch Mortor and a Battery called the Sailers of one 12 Pod. At ten o Clock in the morning of the 1st May our Batteries opend on their Fort and an incessant fire was kept up all that day. We expected great effect from our Guns. We were disappointed, the Enemy had thrown up an Empardment which in a great Measure sheltered them from our fire, and there was a number of Traverses within their Fort. The Enemy fired occasionally at us without doing any injury - We the whole of the next day kept up a continual fire, but the Enemy was very sparing of their shot. The Indians taking Hogs - Oxen - Horses &c from under the very Guns of their Fort and bring them over to our side in great quantity .. The day before this the mails from Sandusky was intercepted by the Indians and taken and by this it was discovered that a reinforcement was coming consisting of thirteen hundred men from St. Marys in Boats. .. on the 5th May intelligence was brought to our Encampment .. that the Enemy were landing. … after sometime the Enemy were driven out and in about three hours from the time of their landing they surrendered It is with regret that I state that a dreadful slaughter commenced on the arrival of the Prisoners at the encampment, the Indians could not be repressed. One of our men was shot in the act of saving the Prisoners - by great exertion we succeeded in sending 467 away on boats &c to Sandusky on their Parole of Honor not to serve against Great Britain during the war unless regularly exchanged. Major (Captain Peter L.J.) Chambers went over to them with a Flag of Truce, was blindfolded and led into the Garrison (Fort Meigs) where he saw General Harrison and effected a exchange of Prisoners …. when the action commenced at our Batteries they made a Sortie from the Fort so powerfull in numbers that they soon got possession of it and took Lieut. McIntyre & Hails with 33 men but the Indians soon came up - retook the Battery and drove them back again with great slaughter (our officers & men were exchanged) so that out of the army of thirteen hundred men only 467 are saved so that there is 993 who died by the Tomahawk &c - But after all this great achievement we were not able to take the fort from the Enemy on acct of their having fortified themselves in so strong a manner, therefore the General (Proctor) thought proper to return without accomplishing it. ....Our loss has not been so great as might be expected in such a conflict - 14 of the 41st (Br, Regiment) killed 47 wounded & Captain of Militia Bondy killed and one or two wounded & from 16 to 18 killed & wounded...Poor Deck Boothe was killed by the Americans. Scalped and cut up by the Americans in a most inhuman manner hardly to be paralleled by Indians..."Major Chambers also demanded the surrender of Fort Meigs - that General Proctor wanted to avoid further bloodshed and that he has with him a large force of Indians. Harrison refused to surrender under any terms. The veiled threat of a large force of uncontrolled Indians had been used against General Hull at Detroit and Harrison was not going to expose his garrison to another massacre like the one at the River Raisin in January.The captured Kentuckians were marched to Fort Miami, where they were forced to run the "gauntlet" between rows of Potawatomi Indians, who beat them with tomahawks, war clubs and rifles killing many. As mentioned in the letter, a British regular from the 41st, tried to call a halt, but was shot through the heart and the slaughter was on. Only appearance of the Shawnee war chief Tecumseh, who stopped the action, prevented it from becoming a general massacre. Many of the prisoners were taken into captivity by the Indians. See Henry Clay letter regarding prisoners of war taken by Indians, lot #48 in this sale. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $7,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
54 c   [Attack on Sacketts Harbor] May 29, 1813 folded letter of Jacob Brown with integral address leaf to Joshua Hatheway at Rome, N.Y., endorsed Brigadier General Commandingthe
Northern Army Sackets Harbor and probably carried by military express,[Attack on Sackett's Harbor] May 29, 1813 folded letter of Jacob Brown with integral address leaf to Joshua Hatheway at Rome, N.Y., endorsed "Brigadier General Commanding/the Northern Army Sackets Harbor" and probably carried by military express, file fold through the endorsement, very fine.On the 28th of May, a British squadron appeared off Sackett's Harbor. The squadron was in command of Sir James Lucas Yeo. The letter by General Jacob Brown describes the action that followed: "Dr Sir, I received an order some days since from Genl Dearborn to take comm and at this Post - Comd (Commodore) Chauncey is up the lake - We were this morning attacked as day dawned by Sir George Prevost in person who made good his landing with at least a thousand picked men - Sir James Yeo commanded the fleet After a tolerably well fought action generally and most admirably as it bore upon some corps - We are completely victorious. Sir George took to his fleet after loosing some distinguished officers and of course some gallant men. Our loss is very severe as to the quality of those who have fallen. The enemy left many of their wounded on the Field - but I have no doubt carryed off many more - We shall probably be again attacked as Sir George must feel very sore. All I can say is, whatever may be the result we will not be disgraced. Jac Brown"General Brown was made Commander in Chief of the Army on 15 June, 1815 until his death on 28 February, 1828. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $1,800.00
Will close during Public Auction
55 c   [Battle of Lake Erie] folded letter with integral address leaf datelined Mouth of Portage River, 18th Sept. 1813 (eight days after the battle) with manuscript SanduskySep 19
(Ohio) postmark and 20 rate to Louisville, Kentucky, very fine.Th[Battle of Lake Erie] folded letter with integral address leaf datelined "Mouth of Portage River, 18th Sept. 1813" (eight days after the battle) with manuscript "Sandusky/Sep 19" (Ohio) postmark and "20" rate to Louisville, Kentucky, very fine.The letter, from John O'Fallon describes the Battle of Lake Erie: "In consequence of the late serious conflict of our vessels on the lake, we have been longer delayed in embarking than was expected but if the winds abate, before tomorrow evening our whole force will be afloat, nearly all the regulars embarked this morning for an Island 8 or ten miles off ... Our victory upon the lake was so complete (the capturing of the whole British navy on this lake, two small vessels of no consequence excepted) that the greatest obstacle, in accomplishing the object of the operations of this army, is now removed. I contemplated upon our being in possession of Malden & Detroit in the course of five days - which done I believe it is the Gen intention, after providing for the retaking of Machinaw, to move down the Lake and cooperate with the northern army. Our Troops, Regulars & Volunteers, in high spirits are anxiously awaiting the moment when they will be permitted to measure their strength & skill with the enemies - which I trust is close at hand. ....Col Croghan is on board the fleet. The Lawrence, our best vessel contended with the whole of the British fleet & sustained their fire till all but 9 of her men were killed or wounded when she was abandoned by the Commodor (Oliver H. Perry); who was getting on board the Niagara renewed the attack and in a short time made the two, much shatterd ships and the rest strike. The action lasted 3 hours & 40 minutes. The enemys vessels carried nine more cannon than ours and a considerably larger number of men. I know not the number killed & wounded on either side, but twas very great on both. Admiral Barclay (Robert H. commanded British fleet) is mortally wounded (he survived); the second in command had his hand shot off and some Lieutenants were killed on the enemy side - on ours, except some unidentified men, only one Lieut of Marines. The B.(ritish) officers, made prisoners left here today for Chilocothe - while with us every kindness and attention were lavished upon them. There yet remains about 300 seamen & Marines to be sent off tomorrow....John 0"Fallon."John O'Fallon entered the army as an Ensign in the 1st Infantry Sept. 28, 1812. Thence to 1st Lt. Aug. 15, 1813. Previously he had campaigned against the Indians in 1811 under Gen. Wm. Henry Harrison. O'Fallon's second wife was the sister of George Rogers and William Clark. In 1818 he went to St. Louis becoming a merchant and fur trader associating with Robert Campbell and the firm of Smith, Sublette & Jackson. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $5,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
56 c   [The Invasion of Canada from Vermont] Camp near Burlington, Septem. 13, 1813 dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf from Colonel H. Atkinson to Major C.K. Gardiner
at Washington, D.C., oval Burlington, Vermont postmark with manu[The Invasion of Canada from Vermont] "Camp near Burlington, Septem. 13, 1813" dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf from Colonel H. Atkinson to Major C.K. Gardiner at Washington, D.C., oval "Burlington, Vermont" postmark with manuscript "Sept. 14" date and endorsed by Atkinson and sent "Free," very fine.Colonel Atkinson writes of troop movements and plans for future attacks: "...The Enemies squadron (much inferior to ours) has dropped down to Isle aux Nior under cover of His Batteries...We shall enter Canada in about ten days with 4000 Troops...I should not be surprised if we were to make a decisive stroke on Montreal..."Brigadier General Wade Hampton was ordered to penetrate Canada towards Montreal. He did go as far as Odell Town, just within the borders of Canada and westward to Rouse's Point. Rather than push ahead, he returned to Champlain and marched westward to a point near the present town of Chateaugay, where he encamped for 26 days awaiting orders. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $850.00
Will close during Public Auction
57   [Fort George and the Burning of Newark] Document Signed Geo. McClure, Br. Genl. of Volunteers, 1 page, oblong 8vo, Fort George, Upper Canada (Ontario), October 19, 1813. Just
weeks before abandoning the fort and ordering the nearby town of Newa[Fort George and the Burning of Newark] Document Signed "Geo. McClure, Br. Genl." of Volunteers, 1 page, oblong 8vo, Fort George, Upper Canada (Ontario), October 19, 1813. Just weeks before abandoning the fort and ordering the nearby town of Newark to be burned, McClure orders a quartermaster to pay "the Indian Jacob Deckstad ten dollars as prize money promis. him." With the document signed by the mark of "Jacob Dockstader" in the amount of $10, "it being for prize money to the Indians," Fort George, October 19, 1813. McClure had been given permission to burn Newark if it was necessary to prevent the British from using it for cover, but in accordance to the uses of war in that era, he was to provide the citizens ample warning so they could evacuate. He neglected to do so, and was in any case forced to abandon Ft. George, retreating to Ft. Niagara. Not long afterward, McClure resigned his commission. The attack on Newark would inspire British retaliation, notably during the Chesapeake Campaign. Making use of Native Americans as allies, scouts, and spies, was common practice for the armies on both sides of the conflict. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $375.00
Will close during Public Auction
58   [Lake Champlain Campaigns] Exciting content letter by (C?) Hawkins in Chazy, NY (between Champlain and Plattsburgh), December 10, 1813, to his brother-in-law in Lansborough, MA.
With his colorful if idiosyncratic phrasing, he says (in part)...[Lake Champlain Campaigns] Exciting content letter by (C?) Hawkins in Chazy, NY (between Champlain and Plattsburgh), December 10, 1813, to his brother-in-law in Lansborough, MA. With his colorful if idiosyncratic phrasing, he says (in part)"...On the 2nd of Novm at evening an express...brot intilegance that four British Rowgallies were entering our waters and also that a land force of twelve hundred had entered Champlain (about Seven miles Distance). This gave the Troops stationed here … reason to expect an attack...but by the Daylight the next morning they had posative inteligince that they the land force had Recrossed the lines which Calmed the full grown fears of our brave Commander and added threfold vigour to his courage...But Aurora's blushing promasis proved falatious after Daylight...I perceved that the Rowgallies...were approaching our landing … The british landed at the wharf about 100 Rods south, Demanded the public property, found nothing but one batteaux which they Claim'd...and Slowly moov'd towards the north." "And now a mean Cowardly tragical farce was acted..... Fasset sent a Captan Wadams...with about 15 or twenty men to anoy the british flotilla with their Small arms and this foolish son of folly and Cawardis took Shelter behind a Rise of land but a little back of my house...at which time the british Capt. with his sturdy warriors fired at the enemy...""Well may you think it a privilege to live at a Distance from the seat of war.....About the first of this month the British went past to Cumberling head in sight of our army with five Rowgallies and burnt a public store but did not much damage and Returned unmolested…" Fold wear and minor repaired splits affecting the integral address leaf. The struggle for supremacy on Lake Champlain would escalate over the next several months, culminating in the Battle of Plattsburgh, in which the British Navy was defeated. As the present letter shows, many Americans had little respect for their own soldiers, especially militia. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $800.00
Will close during Public Auction
59   [American Prisoners of War in Canada] Outstanding lot of letters and printed documents concerning prisoners in the war between the United States and Great Britain. Includes
three autograph letters by Thomas Randall, an American prisoner of war in[American Prisoners of War in Canada] Outstanding lot of letters and printed documents concerning prisoners in the war between the United States and Great Britain. Includes three autograph letters by Thomas Randall, an American prisoner of war in Quebec Prison, January-June 1814. The first letter goes by Genl. William H. Winder, who has been exchanged after his capture at Stony Creek in July 1813 (and would later be routed at Bladensburg, MD). In it, Randall writes, "The situation in which we have been placed since the commencement of this unfortunate and cruel System of Retaliations...has been rendered as comfortable … with a strict and unrelenting confinement. We are allowed Books in our Prison ...The consciousness likewise that our misfortunes are unmerited and our Country will take every measure...to reinstate us to the rank of Freemen, dispels the gloom. .. Every circumstance...seems to indicate a speedy Exchange."However, in April, while others are being exchanged, Randall has not. In June, he writes asks a friend to "...Attribute it to the peculiar situation in which we are placed as Pr. of War, which precludes us from entering on any topic not particularly relating to ourselves…." These letters show the sharp contrast in the treatment of officers and of regular soldiers. While Randall and his colleagues were reading and socializing in confinement, American regulars were crammed into prison ships in Quebec Harbor, where many died of exposure and illness.With printed Broadside proclaiming the Cartel for the Exchange of Prisoners of War between Great Britain, and the United States of America, 22.5" x 17.5" Signed in type by James Monroe, May 12, 1813. With Book: Message from the President of the United States, Transmitting Documents Relative to the Commencement and Progress of any Acts or System of Retaliation upon Prisoners of War... James Madison. Washington, A & G Way, 1814. 8vo, 48 pp, no wraps. String bound. One measure of retaliation that had been taken was the British confinement of two American officers for every one British officer in American hands. Front cover detached but present. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $4,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
60   [British Navy Coastal Attacks] Good content pair of 1814 letters recounting attacks by the fearsome British Navy. The first, an incomplete but informative letter written from
Yorktown, VA, July 2, 1814, relates the news that there was (short exce[British Navy Coastal Attacks] Good content pair of 1814 letters recounting attacks by the fearsome British Navy. The first, an incomplete but informative letter written from Yorktown, VA, July 2, 1814, relates the news that there was (short excerpt only) :"a British Fleet...off here. The fleet reported at 30 sail diminished regularly as we approached and on our arrival here we find a 74 and 2 frigates anchored about 10 miles below here. They fired some 20 or 30 guns on coming to anchor without any apparent object and have not moved since...In March last 12 or 15 houses were burnt, among them the large Brick church." He goes on to give a fine description of the town and to tell the story of the famous siege, and also describes Williamsburg. Minor separations at some folds. The British began their Chesapeake Campaign in earnest, and in August would sack Washington, DC.The second letter, from Sally Howe of Stonington, CT, is to her cousin Byron Dimon of Bristol, RI. She writes that "John Bull has paid us a visit and has been complimented in a high style." The British had demanded the town's surrender on August 9, but the citizens refused, and were bombarded. There was only one American casualty, an elderly woman. "Our house is injured some by the shells and has been pillaged of considerable but we have a home and that is more than we expected...Our volunteers has gained immortal honor, Cousin George in particular. He nailed the flag to the staff and fought till the last moment...John Fellows...is badly hurt in his shoulder so as to prevent his useing right arm, done by his horse throwing him." Seal hole at right edge, removing the word "his" in the last line quoted. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $675.00
Will close during Public Auction

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