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EXPLORATION AND WAR continued...

LOUISIANA PURCHASE AND NORTHWEST TERRITORY
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
21   [The Louisiana Purchase - Thomas Jefferson and George Rogers Clark sign the same document]Jefferson, Thomas, Rare and historic Document Signed Thomas Jefferson as Governor of
Virginia, and G.R. Clark twice as commander of Continental forc[The Louisiana Purchase - Thomas Jefferson and George Rogers Clark sign the same document]Jefferson, Thomas, Rare and historic Document Signed "Thomas Jefferson" as Governor of Virginia, and "G.R. Clark" twice as commander of Continental forces in the northwestern frontier, 2 pages, 4to, "Fort Clark in the Illinois" (and Richmond, VA), June 24 1779 and April 9, 1781. An exceptionally large and bold Jefferson signature.The document is a first exchange (number 124) requesting the treasurer of Virginia to "Please pay Monsr. Rago Bovay or order the Sum of four Hundred and forty four dollars and four fifths, it being for Flour &ca furnished for the Troops Stationed in the Illinois Country." Written and signed by Commissary General "Willm. Shannon" and endorsed by Rogers at the bottom of the page.On the verso, Rogers signs a request: "Reducing this Bill to the Value in hard money at the time given the Bearer must be Entitled to the Exchange in paper Currency on the day of payment." The auditors of Virginia determine that "The exchange between Continental and hard money at Kaskaskia (which Clark had captured from the British in July 1778) at the Date of the within having been at eighty for one, be pleased to issue to the bearer Mr. James Conand ("Rago Bovay" has been crossed through) for Genl. Clarke on account a warrant for four thousand eight hundred & forty eight Dollars Continental money." Governor Jefferson signs boldly below. Minor ink erosion from an especially bold paraph on recto, paper repair to a minor split at central fold. With Book: Sketch of his Campaign in the Illinois....George Rogers Clark. Cincinnati, Robert Clarke & Co., 1869. 8vo, green cloth with gilt spine. Pictorial frontispiece. Risvold label on front pastedown.Jefferson, Thomas - Third President of the United States (1743-1826, served 1801-09); Vice President under John Adams; made the Louisiana Purchase from Napoleon, doubling the nation's size. Clark, George Rogers - American soldier (1752-1818); commanded western Virginia militia (from what would become Kentucky) in the Revolutionary War, pushing into the territory north of the Ohio River; his victories against the small British outposts there would lead England to cede the Northwest Territory to the United States in the Treaty of Paris. Brother of the explorer William Clark.Sadly, despite payments like the present one, Clark was never fully reimbursed for the expenses he bore during his service in the Revolutionary War. As Monsieur Bovay's name suggests, the region that is now Illinois was settled primarily by Native Americans and French-speakers, who were only too glad to assist Britain's enemies. Just two months after signing this decision, Governor Thomas Jefferson suffered the most humiliating moment of his political career: warned that a column of redcoats under Banastre Tarleton was nearing his home, he fled the area, giving the impression that he had abandoned his post (though the state legislature, which was meeting at his home, also fled). (imagea) (Image) Est. $10,000-15,000

SOLD for $25,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
22   A Journal of the Voyages and Travels of a Corps of Discovery Under the Command of Captain Lewis and Captain Clarke., Patrick Gass. London, J. Budd, 1808 (from Pittsburgh, David
MKeehan, 1807). First English edition. 8vo, later full calf withA Journal of the Voyages and Travels of a Corps of Discovery Under the Command of Captain Lewis and Captain Clarke., Patrick Gass. London, J. Budd, 1808 (from Pittsburgh, David M'Keehan, 1807). First English edition. 8vo, later full calf with gilt spine and tops, banded spine. Lacks original endpapers, but has 16 pages of book advertisements at back. Risvold label on modern endpaper. A very important historic work, scarce in this condition. (imagea) (Image) Est. $3,000-4,000

SOLD for $5,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
23   Travels to the Source of the Missouri River and Across the American Continent to the Pacific Ocean., Merriwether Lewis and William Clark. London, Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and
Brown, 1815. Three volumes. 8vo, modern ¼ calf with banded and giltTravels to the Source of the Missouri River and Across the American Continent to the Pacific Ocean., Merriwether Lewis and William Clark. London, Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1815. Three volumes. 8vo, modern ¼ calf with banded and gilt spines, gilt tops. With folding map in volume I, with later linen backing for strength. Volumes I and III lack half titles. Bookplates (John Thomas Lee) and Risvold labels on pastedowns. Some toning and light foxing but still a sharp copy. (imagea) (imageb) (Image) Est. $3,000-4,000

SOLD for $8,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
24   A Journal of Voyages and Travels in the Interiour of North America., Daniel Williams Harmon. Andover, Flagg and Gould, 1820. First edition. 8vo, full calf with gilt spine. Engraved frontis, fold-out map. Risvold label on pastedown. Some warping of boards. Interior lightly foxed. Est. $300-400

SOLD for $400.00
Will close during Public Auction
25   Account of an Expedition from Pittsburgh to the Rocky Mountains., Edwin James. Philadelphia, HC Carey and I. Lea, 1822-23. Three volumes (including atlas). 8vo, later faux
leather with plain boards, gilt spines, atlas with original cloth withAccount of an Expedition from Pittsburgh to the Rocky Mountains., Edwin James. Philadelphia, HC Carey and I. Lea, 1822-23. Three volumes (including atlas). 8vo, later faux leather with plain boards, gilt spines, atlas with original cloth with brown boards, label title. Risvold label on front pastedown of atlas. Some foxing, overall edge wear, atlas title page minor repair; very fine. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $7,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
26   Account of an Expedition from Pittsburgh to the Rocky Mountains., Edwin James. London, Longman, Hurst, Rees, et al, 1823. Three volumes. First English edition. 8vo, rebacked
with original paper spines with hand-written labels from a contemporAccount of an Expedition from Pittsburgh to the Rocky Mountains., Edwin James. London, Longman, Hurst, Rees, et al, 1823. Three volumes. First English edition. 8vo, rebacked with original paper spines with hand-written labels from a contemporary library. All eight plates (three tinted) and both fold-out maps. Risvold label on pastedown of volume I. Each volume in protective folder, with a beautiful leather clamshell case for the set; very fine. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
27   A Pilgrimage in Europe and America Leading to the Discovery of the Sources of the Mississippi and Bloody River., G.C. Beltrami. London, Hunt and Clarke, 1828. Two volumes. 8vo,
later morocco with gilt cover designs and edges, with earlier (poA Pilgrimage in Europe and America Leading to the Discovery of the Sources of the Mississippi and Bloody River., G.C. Beltrami. London, Hunt and Clarke, 1828. Two volumes. 8vo, later morocco with gilt cover designs and edges, with earlier (possibly original) spine. Folding map and folding plan, three plates and engraved frontis. Gift inscription (1846) on second free endpaper, bookplates on both pastedowns, some foxing. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $325.00
Will close during Public Auction
28   Map of the United States., Solomon Schoyer. NY, 1826 - 16½x20½, - hand-colored in outline, folding into orig 12mo paper covers. One fold tear without loss, some breaks at fold
joints, overall soiling, cover rubbed.Map of the United States., Solomon Schoyer. NY, 1826 - 16½"x20½", - hand-colored in outline, folding into orig 12mo paper covers. One fold tear without loss, some breaks at fold joints, overall soiling, cover rubbed. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $260.00
Will close during Public Auction
29   Mitchells Travellers Guide Through the United States., Samuel Augustus Mitchell. Phila., 1834 - 12mo, original leather wallet-style binding. With folding colored map. Minor
faults. With patriotic sticker on front pastedown. The maps westerMitchell's Traveller's Guide Through the United States., Samuel Augustus Mitchell. Phila., 1834 - 12mo, original leather wallet-style binding. With folding colored map. Minor faults. With patriotic sticker on front pastedown. The map's western terminus: the Missouri Territory. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $525.00
Will close during Public Auction
30   An Illustrated Atlas, Geographical, Statistical, and Historical of the United States..., Thomas G. Bradford. Boston, (1838). Folio, original half leather with leather title
label, banded and gilt spine. With hand-colored engraved title bearinAn Illustrated Atlas, Geographical, Statistical, and Historical of the United States..., Thomas G. Bradford. Boston, (1838). Folio, original half leather with leather title label, banded and gilt spine. With hand-colored engraved title bearing owner's note, and 39 partly hand-colored maps. Laid in is a manuscript color map of Cumberland County, NJ. Boards and spine wear but fully intact. An exceptional condition copy of this important atlas. (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $5,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
31   Mapping the Transmississippi West., Carl I. Wheat. San Francisco, Institute of Historical Cartography (using various printers), 1957-63. Five volumes in six. One of 1,000 copies. Folio, original ¼ green morocco with tan cloth. Risvold labels on pastedowns. Very nearly as new. Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $1,150.00
Will close during Public Auction
32   [The founding of Chicago, Illinois] An exceptional pair of letters that concern the earliest days in the life of what would become the great city of Chicago. Includes a historic
letter by Robert Abbott, an agent of the American Fur Company, writt[The founding of Chicago, Illinois] An exceptional pair of letters that concern the earliest days in the life of what would become the great city of Chicago. Includes a historic letter by Robert Abbott, an agent of the American Fur Company, written in Detroit, April 30, 1803, to Messrs. Abbott & Maxwell in Michilimackinac (near present-day Mackinaw City, Michigan). He reports that "The Cincinata [sic] Mail arrived here two days ago and brings accounts of a Garrison being immediately erected at Chicago. Capn. Whistler is to have Command...and will leave this in a few days with his Comp'y, which consists of 80 Men to go and erect the Garrison. This is a good opening for you if you wish to extend your Trade. Capn. Whistler has wished that we wou'd send a Stove there..." Silked for restoration, for the letter is cleanly separated at all folds. With an interesting later 19th-century note tipped to integral address leaf, identifying the letter as concerning the beginning of Chicago, and also stating, "This letter found in the old Warehouse of the Hudson Bay Company at Mackinaw". Before the end of 1803, Whistler and his men had built Fort Dearborn, around which would gather the community that became Chicago.With a letter by Jean Baptiste Beaubien, another AFC agent and one of Chicago's early city fathers. A business letter, in French, written in Chicago, October 18, 1823, to Robert Stuart in Michilimackinac. He explains that he has paid Ramsey Crook, "A.F.C. seven hundred piastres to settle all accounts with James Kenzie." (imagea) (Image) Est. $300-4,000

SOLD for $2,600.00
Will close during Public Auction
33   [Louisiana Purchase, French Governor anticipating of the transfer] Important letter signed by the last French governor of Louisiana informing Genl. Rochambeau in Haiti of the
impending cession of Louisiana, Pierre Clement de Laussat, New Orleans,[Louisiana Purchase, French Governor anticipating of the transfer] Important letter signed by the last French governor of Louisiana informing Genl. Rochambeau in Haiti of the impending cession of Louisiana, Pierre Clement de Laussat, New Orleans, September 30, 1803. He writes on the engraved stationery of the Marine Colony of Louisiana to Genl. Donatien-Marie-Joseph de Vimeur, Vicomte de Rochambeau (son of the American Revolutionary general), who leads French forces in the attempt to put down the slave rebellion in St. Domingue. Rochambeau had requested flour to feed his troops, but Laussat has not been able to comply because the cutter on which he wished to send it was not yet seaworthy. He has also been awaiting instructions from France, even delaying the ship's:" … I've learned with a great deal of probability of the cession of Louisiana to the United States, but up until now I have neither orders, nor instructions, nor official advice of any kind. If the cutter could have been loaded with flour, as I proposed...I would have taken upon myself to send you some...In the event that the Government authorizes me to use my resources to assist you, I would try at once to combine the liveliest and most eager zeal with the necessary prudence; these resources, I must tell you, General, are fewer than you would think." With the seal of the Marine Colony on integral address leaf. At the time of this letter, matters in St. Domingue were just about to turn radically against the French. France had re-established control over the colony in May 1804. But it was soon apparent that they would return to the practice of slavery, which had been abolished, and the remaining black leaders began an open rebellion against French rule just days after Laussat wrote this missive. By November, Rochambeau was forced to surrender, and St. Domingue, renaming itself Haiti, became the second independent nation in the Americas, and the sole example of a successful slave rebellion. The Louisiana Purchase had been concluded in Paris in May, partly because the Haitian Revolution had convinced Napoleon that his empire in the Americas was not worth holding. The formal organization of the Louisiana Territory would take place just five days after this letter. (imagea) (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $12,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
34   [Louisiana Purchase, French Governor formally receiving Louisiana from Spain for transfer to the United States] Important letter signed by Pierre Clement de Laussat, last French
governor of Louisiana, to M. Duparc, commander of the Point Coupee,[Louisiana Purchase, French Governor formally receiving Louisiana from Spain for transfer to the United States] Important letter signed by Pierre Clement de Laussat, last French governor of Louisiana, to M. Duparc, commander of the Point Coupee, on the stationery of the Marine Colony of Louisiana, New Orleans, December 10, 1803. Changing his imprinted title from "Colonial Prefect of Louisiana" to "Colonial Prefect Commissioner of the French Government," he sends Duparc "the order which I have issued concerning taking possession of the French Republic of Louisiana in your district. I reached an agreement on it, in advance, with the commissioners of S.M.C. (Sa Majeste Catholique = His Catholic Majesty, King Charles IV of Spain) dated the 12th of Frimaire (Dec. 4, 1803)." Spain had retroceded Louisiana to France formally just ten days earlier, though she had secretly given it to France in 1800. Ten days after this letter, the French would formally transfer possession to the United States.With a historic printed invitation, sent by Laussat to Duparc on December 11, 1803, "Citizen Laussat...on the occasion of taking Louisiana from the hands of Spain and its remission to the United States, begs you to participate...in a soiree that he has dedicated to the Marquis of Casa-Calvo, Brigadier of the Spanish Armies, one of the Commissioners of S.M.C., in reply to the brilliant welcome he gave to the representative of the French Nation." Top right corner missing, but complete. (imagea) (Image) Est. $3,000-4,000

SOLD for $29,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
35   [Louisiana Purchase and Northwest Territory Balance] A small but interesting balance lot of two letters and two documents from the new frontier of the early 19th century. One letter, from 1808, is from Samuel Omelvany from "Milses old ferry on the Ohio River,"to Michael Jones, register of the US Land Office in Kaskaskie, in reference to taking applications. The other is from a French consul in New Orleans, mostly concerning business matters with Americans. One of the documents is a warrant to the sheriff of Jefferson County, Northwest Territory, (now most of northeastern Ohio), Sept. 3, 1801, for the arrest of Michael Kline for trespass and $800 in damages owed to Samuel Carothers. Finally, with an annual return for the second brigade in the fourth division of the Massachusetts militia for 1810-11. The last item has a piece out at bottom affecting the date on its recto. Est. $300-400

SOLD for $425.00
Will close during Public Auction
THE WAR OF 1812
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
36   A Highly Important John Adams LetterAdams, John, An incredible content Autograph Letter Signed John Adams, four pages, quarto, Quincy, Massachusetts, April 2, 1813. Writing to
his old colleague and good friend, Elbridge Gerry (1744-1814), who aA Highly Important John Adams LetterAdams, John, An incredible content Autograph Letter Signed "John Adams," four pages, quarto, Quincy, Massachusetts, April 2, 1813. Writing to his old colleague and good friend, Elbridge Gerry (1744-1814), who at the time of this letter was vice president under James Madison, he begins wittily with an appropriation from Virgil: "Infandum, vice Preses, jubes renovare dolorem," (Vice President, you force me to revisit inexpressible pain). Gerry had asked him about the national mood when he was sworn in as vice president, specifically regarding England. Adams prefaces his comments by reminding his friend that:"In that moment the French Revolution, a gigantic Infant begotten by Folly, midwife into the world by Madness, nurtured by Atheism, Deism, and every Species of Vice and Wickedness was four or five years old. IDEOLOGY was Supreme and Souvreign in Europe and America. The French Constitution of 1789 was recd. In Congress with rapture. Elsworth in Senate and Madison in the House moved and carried Votes of Admiration of it. When I put the question in Senate, a duty I could not avoid, I felt as if I should sink through the board that supported me. I considered the Senate as recording an eternal monument of their own Ignorance and the Nations disgrace Washington and his satellites were as enthusiastic."Turning to the feeling toward Great Britain at the time, he explains that:"The Treaty of Peace of 1783 was openly violated by both Parties. By G. Britain by holding Possesion of all the Military Posts on the Lakes - by refusing payment for the Negroes &c. and by the United States by positive laws, in every one of the States against the recovery of the old British Debts &c. Here was a formidable combination of three powerful Interests, the Antifederalists, the French Revolutionists, and the old Debtors to Britains and Tories… Washington was perplexed. .. He dreaded England and feared that France was too much embarrassed at home to assist him. The Antifederalists reviled and libeled me a MONARCHIST. The French and the Jacobins, represented me not only as a Monarchist, but as an Englishman and an Antigallican. Hamilton, Knox, Jefferson, Madison Duer &c were jealous of too close an Intimacy between Washington and me. We were watched by green Eyed Jealousy on every side.""In this situation W. had recourse to his military Genius and Experience, for Pretexts. The first was an Invitation for me and my Family to accompany him, his Family and suite on a visit to Princes Gardens on Long Island where he led me a long ramble where Politicks not Horticulture were the Principal Subject. The next some months afterwards was another Similar Invitation to the Heights of Haerlem. After dinner at the Contre House the President sent an Invitation to walk with him alone, to show me the Field of one of his Battles. We were no sooner alone together than he said, he proposed this ramble that he might have some confidential conversation with me upon public affairs. He said he wanted my opinion and Advice especially upon the State of our foreign affairs."Quoting Washington, Adams continues: "The conduct of G. Britain was hostile and intolerable. She trampled on the Treaty, She held possession of all the military Posts on the Frontier. She commanded the Indian countries, She monopolized the Trade of Furrs and peltries, She continually impressed our seamen &c; on another hand, Spain was as unfriendly at the Southward. We were likely to be completely Surrounded. In these Circumstances, France being So much occupied with her internal concerns and but So Slightly connected with us, We are in danger of being at War with Great Britain and Spain at the same time and without any alliance or Assistance from abroad. I have thought of sending a Minister to France to propose a new Treaty, enter into a closer connection by ceding to her and Securing to ourselves, Some greater Advantages, than are in the present Treaty. But before I determined upon such a Measure, I was anxious to have your advice."Adams gave his opinion: "As Fate had ordained, I had been more intimately acquainted with France, and the rise of its Revolution from 1778 to 1789 than any Man in America and I verily believe more anxious about its effect in America than any Man in the world. I entreated him not to think of any closer Connections with France at present. Here it would require six sheets of paper to give you the answer in detail. The Heads were 1. The Anarchy in France 2, Their total Incapacity for forming a free Government. 3, The Characters of the leading Men, whom I personally know to be, tho Scientific and learned in general, yet totally ignorant of a free Government, and totally wrong and erroneous in their Idea of it. 4, That the then present Policy in France could end in nothing but military despotism. 5, That a long Civil War in france would insue. 6, That an endless War in Europe would be lighted up. 6th (sic) That Neutrality was the only Anchor of our safety."Adams proposes sending a minister to London, assuring Washington that one will be accepted if it comes from him. He tells Washington that the United States will not be forced to take sides between England and France, and: "We ought to exert our most Strenuous Endeavours to avoid it at least as long as possible, and I see no way of avoiding it immediately but by Negotiation with Great Britain, for the Antifederalists, the Debtors to Britain and the Democrats among our own People are red hot for a War with England. 7. The Contagion of Democracy and Levelling has already taken deep root in the U.S. Nearly one half of our Nation, if not more think that the Constitution of the U.S. is too monarchical and too aristocratical. If we enter into more intimate connections with France, at this Time, when the Enthusiasm of Levelling has Seised the Nation and prevaided all hearts, they will allumine the same Bile in American and throw us all into greater Confusion than ever. 8th, This will infallibly involve us in an immediate War with England: and when once get into a War closely connected in Alliance with either Power, I see not how We shall ever get out; for this French Revolution will last as long and enkindle a general War as long as that of the Reformation."Washington thinks for a few minutes and thanks Adams for his advice. Then states, "As we passed a particular spot, He said, 'Here is the place where they peppered Us.' And this was all that was said about the Battle of Haerlem Heights. Instead of sending a Minister to England, it was contrived I supposed by Hamilton, to send G(ourverneur) Morris without a Commission to England. He sent none to England till 1793. Before which time France and England had plundered our Commerce, without Mercy. Mr. Jefferson by Mr. Madison began the restrictive systems of Embargoes, Non Importations and Non Intercourses. Mr Madisons Propositions failed in the senate by one vote. Impressment of Seaman, was always, a Point from the Peace of 1783 to this time."He wishes Gerry health and honor as vice president, adding: "You cannot have had more unpleasant Treatment nor more perplexing care, in that Station than was experience by your friend, John Adams." Clean separation of pages at hinge. Two places at edges where mounting traces obscure parts of four words; overall very fine.Adams had been unpleasantly surprised when, as vice president, he was generally excluded from the deliberations of the cabinet, and called the post "the most insignificant office that ever the invention of man contrived or his imagination conceived." Therefore the rare moments when George Washington sought his counsel were noteworthy indeed. This extraordinary letter provides an almost painful sense of Adams's wounded pride, his hunger for acknowledgement, and his indignation toward his detractors. Though Adams letters are rarely dull, very few in private hands have such historic and revealing content. (imagea) (Image) Est. $100,000-150,000

SOLD for $160,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
37   [North-Western Army of Ohio, William Eustis] Rare war-date and war-content Letter Signed W. Eustis as Secretary of War, 1-13 pages, 4to, Washington, September 1, 1812. He writes
to Governor Simon Snyder of Pennsylvania:I have to request you[North-Western Army of Ohio, William Eustis] Rare war-date and war-content Letter Signed "W. Eustis" as Secretary of War, 1-1/3 pages, 4to, Washington, September 1, 1812. He writes to Governor Simon Snyder of Pennsylvania:"I have to request your Excellence to hasten the march of the two thousand Troops required through General Dearborn. You will please to communicate with him, & adopt such measures as he may recommend. I am now commanded by the President so far to vary the destination of the Brigade...as to have them detached and rendezvous in such part of the State as will enable them to join the North-Western Army in the State of Ohio as soon as practicable...This force will be required in addition to those for General Dearborn's Command, and the recent disaster at Detroit (which Genl. William Hull had surrendered in July) requires that they should be marched without delay. I shall dispatch an Officer to Pittsburg …." Docketed on blank integral page. Eustis, William - American surgeon, soldier, and statesman (1753-1825); served as a surgeon in the American Revolution, Secretary of War under Madison during the beginning of the War of 1812, he was compelled to resign in January 1813 due to the poor showing of American troops.To a large extent, it was General Henry Dearborn who was at fault in the "disaster at Detroit" mentioned in this letter. He had not sent sufficient troops to help Genl. Hull hold the garrison against the British. Though not uncommon in other forms, Eustis is very rare in war-related letters from this period due to his short service. (imagea) (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
38   [Fort Meigs and the Battle of the Thames, William H. Harrison] Three important Letters Signed during the War of 1812, one also signed by Lewis Cass. One describes the siege of
Ft. Meigs another mentions the great victory in the Battle of the Tha[Fort Meigs and the Battle of the Thames, William H. Harrison] Three important Letters Signed during the War of 1812, one also signed by Lewis Cass. One describes the siege of Ft. Meigs; another mentions the great victory in the Battle of the Thames; and the last represents one of Harrison's last acts before resigning in disgust over his treatment by the War Department. All are written to Secretary of War John Armstrong in Washington. The first is for the most part an ALS, Camp Meigs, Ohio, May 5, 1813. The letter begins in the hand of a clerk, switching to Harrison's writing in the first paragraph. He reports: "another disaster to the Kentucky troops, not indeed any comparison to that of the River Raisin in point of killed and wounded, but exceeding it as to the number of prisoners." On April 28, "the British Troops destined to besiege this place was then in view. On the succeeding night they broke ground upon the heights opposite & on the following morning our Batteries opened upon them and continued a partial firing throughout that and the following day. On the first of May the enemy returned it,..." On May 3 the British started crossing the river and placing batteries on the near side. "They were soon, however, driven from that position," though the artillery duel continued. "There was no preventative but that of taking the Batteries." However, he received word that General Clay would reach him in two hours with reinforcements. He sent word to Clay to land upriver and capture the guns, "and never was any thing more completely successful. The four Batteries were immediately taken possession of & their defenders driven off & the cannon spiked. But that confidence which always attends Militia when successful proved their ruin."" ... the British troops & an immense body of Indians were broat up. A severe action then took place. The British immediately intercepted the retreat of our men …About one hundred fifty only out of nearly Eight hundred effected their escape to the boats. When the ballance of Genl. Clays force made its appearance & attempted to land above the Garrison, their flank was attacked by a large body of Indians." Harrison sent out the men he had prepared for the sally that was to follow Clay's capture of the guns, and they "succeeded in driving the Enemy entirely off .. the Enemy were driven from their works, a number killed, and two British officers & Forty-one privates brought into camp …." Harrison was able to hold at Fort Meigs, and soon the Indians, frustrated with the siege, dispersed. In the next letter, from Buffalo, October 24, 1813, Harrison informs Armstrong that he has just landed and:"the aggregate number of Troops with me, is about thirteen hundred but not more than one thousand fit for duty…. Not having received your directions and being entirely ignorant of the state of our military operations in this quarter I was much at a loss to know how to proceed. But believing that Genl. Cass with his Brigade would be able to secure Detroit and our adjacent Conquests, after having concluded an armistice with the greater part of the Hostile Tribes, I concluded that I could not do better than to move down the Lake with the remaining part of the Troops. I shall move down the Troops immediately to Fort George (across the Niagara River in Ontario; it had been captured in May 1813) where I shall await your orders unless an opportunity should previously occur of striking at the enemy."The information he has on British movements is sketchy. He adds that "on the 5th Instant I was fortunate enough to overtake Genl. Proctor and after a short action to capture upwards of six hundred of his regulars and to defeat and disperse his Indian force." This victory was known as the Battle of the Thames, in which the Shawnee chief Tecumseh was killed, shattering the confederation of northern Native American tribes that he had formed. With a Postscript Signed "W.H.H.," in which he asks that his courier be rewarded if he reaches Washington quickly. Harrison would soon be ordered to abandon Ft. George and Ft. Niagara, and burned the village of Newark (now Niagara-on-the-Lake). General Cass, who was at the time governor of the Michigan Territory, would later become Secretary of War and Secretary of State.The third letter, in a secretary's hand and also signed by Gen. Lew Cass, Harrison writes that: "Information has reached us from Detroit which convinces us that the situation of that Country is critical. The facts we have not now time to detail and they will probably reach you in a less questionable shape from Detroit. Suffice it to say it is there beleived that the British will make an attempt upon that Post during the absence of the Troops. (The garrison had gone to attack the British Fort Mackinac.) Such an attempt if made would probably succeed, as the force which remains there is merely nominal. It has the effect of alarming the Country, of encouraging the disaffected on the Canada side, and of breaking up many of the settlements in the vicinity. Its effect among the Indians is already perceptible. We have deemed it expedient for General Cass to leave here immediately for that Country and to take with him such of the warriors of the friendly Indians as feel disposed to accompany and can be immediately equipt. We have promised them sixty cents per day for each man and Horse and one Dollar per day for each Chief, in the proportion of one to every twenty Warriors. We trust the government will ratify this agreement."Soon after this letter, Harrison resigned his commission. Meanwhile, the attack on Ft. Mackinac was repulsed and American troops returned to Detroit, which the British had not attacked in their absence. Lower parts of both pages of first letter are detached but present. Fine.Harrison, William Henry - Ninth President of the United States (1773-1841, served March-April 1841); son of Benjamin Harrison, he joined the army after his father's death and became governor of the Indiana Territory. He gained national attention for defeating a Native American uprising at the Battle of Tippecanoe; in the War of 1812 his victory at the Battle of the Thames ranks second only to New Orleans as an American victory on land. (imagea) (imageb) (Image) Est. $7,500-10,000

SOLD for $26,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
39   [From Occupied Canada, William Henry Harrison] Battle of the Thames. Harrison, William Henry Outstanding content Letter Signed Willm. H. Harrison on verso of covering address
leaf, 4 pages and one line, Head Quarters, Sandwich (part of presen[From Occupied Canada, William Henry Harrison] Battle of the Thames. Harrison, William Henry Outstanding content Letter Signed "Willm. H. Harrison" on verso of covering address leaf, 4 pages and one line, "Head Quarters, Sandwich" (part of present-day Windsor, Canada), September 30, 1813. He writes to Secretary of War John Armstrong that:"The enemy having broken down the bridges over several unfordable creeks between Amhursburgh and this place I was unable to reach it untill yesterday. Genl. Procter had the night before left his encampment eight miles above pursuing the road on the margin of the Lake to the Thames. Having so much the start...& having striped the country of horses...it was impossible to pursue him further...until we could be joined by Col. (Richard Mentor) Johnsons Regiment of mounted infantry which was on its way from Fort Meigs...The Col. arrived this day at Detroit & his Regt. is now crossing over...They will be all over in the morning when we shall again take up the line of march." Genl. Procter has about 575 regulars and "from six hundred to a thousand Indians...If he makes the contemplated stand on the river Trench he will be able to add several hundred Militia..."The Potawatmies & a Banditti of Winebagoes, Fals Avoins, and other Northwestern indians are on the River Rouge (a tributary of the Detroit).They remain'd in the vicinity of Detroit until the arrival of the army at this place and continued to plunder the inhabitants to the last moment. Indeed but for our opportune arrival, it is more than probable that there would have been a general massacre...The Ottowas and Chippewas have withdrawn from them and have sent in three of their Warriors to beg for peace...I have agreed to receive them upon condition of their giving hostages for their fidelity and immediately joining us with all their Warriors. The Wyandots, Miamis and the band of Delawares which had joined the enemy, are also desirous to be received on the same terms. I shall enter into no engagement with them upon the subject of their lands but refer the whole to the decision of the President...Two thousand men placed at Detroit could not protect the scattered settlements from the depredations of the hostile Indians...I think it necessary however that some example should be made and every motive of justice and policy points out the Potawatimies as the Tribe, which ought to be selected for the purpose. They are the most guilty and the most able on any further occasion to give trouble...The celebrated Chief Mair Pock is at the head of the hostile band on the Detroit side of the Straight. Tecumseh leads that which remains with the British...Their object in dividing their force was to make a night attack upon the part of the army which crossed over to Detroit or that which remained on this side by a junction of their forces some miles above. A detachment of the army and some of the vessels of War will set out for the reduction of Maccinac (Fr. Mackinac, on an island in the strait between lower and upper Michigan) and St. Josephs in a few days. The occupancy of Chicago must be left for another season. The Militia have already become restless and desirous of returning home."As worried as Harrison was about his militia, Genl. Henry Procter was mismanaging his retreat up the Thames, leading to mutinous feelings among his soldiers and especially his native allies under Tecumseh. Greatly outnumbering the British, Harrison's force of over 3,000 moved out two days after he sent this letter. They attacked on October 5, and Procter's ill-prepared soldiers fired a single volley before fleeing or surrendering. Tecumseh and his warriors fought on, but he was killed in a cavalry charge, and his men dispersed upon learning of his death. The battle secured Detroit for the United States. Harrison returned to Washington a war hero. (imagea) (imageb) (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $13,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
40   [William Henry Harrison, 1840 Campaign] Harrison illustrated letter sheets, lot of six comprised of four different designs used during his 1840 presidential campaign, included a
hand painted multicolored design published by Narine & Co. of N.Y.,[William Henry Harrison, 1840 Campaign] Harrison illustrated letter sheets, lot of six comprised of four different designs used during his 1840 presidential campaign, included a hand painted multicolored design published by Narine & Co. of N.Y., a large elaborate design with his portrait and log cabin also by Narine, three with identical portrait and log cabin designs by an unknown publisher and lastly a log cabin design by J.S. Horton of Baltimore, four with integral address leaves, generally fine-very fine. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $725.00
Will close during Public Auction

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