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EXPLORATION AND WAR continued...

THE WAR OF 1812 continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
61 c   [Battle of Chippewa] July 5, 1814 folded letter with integral address leaf to Greene, New York with manuscript Buffalo N.Y.July 11 postmark and 17 rate, very fine.The sender, H.
Callender, writes under the dateline Buffalo July 10th 1814:[Battle of Chippewa] July 5, 1814 folded letter with integral address leaf to Greene, New York with manuscript "Buffalo N.Y./July 11" postmark and "17" rate, very fine.The sender, H. Callender, writes under the dateline "Buffalo July 10th 1814": "I just drop a few words to you relating to our arms, our Army under command of Major Gen. Brown, Brig. Gen. Scott & Ripley.... Crossed the Niagara on the eve of the 2nd and on the third Fort Erie was surrendered without opposition in which were about 150 men - On the next day our Army passed down the Niagara met with some little opposition at Black Creek about 12 miles down river but the British retired to Chippeway where they had a strong and well fortified position. On the 5th Inst. they marched out of Chippeway and met our Army about two miles and a half above, where Gen. Scott's Brigade, the Seneca Indians, and Pennsylvania Volunteers engaged them and after a severe engagement of near two hours the British were obliged to retire leaving as report says three hundred dead and wounded on the field. Our loss in killed is stated at 71, wounded 150, many severely. All the wounded capable of being removed have been conveyed to this place and it is a shocking sight to behold. Some with one leg, some with one arm, many shot through the body. Arms, legs and in fact every part of body mangled. One was tomahawked in five places through the scull was brought here alive. Likewise three that were scalped, all save one of which have since died. The British have since evacuated Chippeway, our Army in pursuit &c. The groans of the wounded and dying are constantly sounding in our ears. We have an Officer in our house which was shot through the body which we expect will not survive many days....I write this in great haste knowing you would be anxious to hear from this frontier....H. Callender." (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $2,200.00
Will close during Public Auction
62   [Siege Fort Erie] A first-hand account of the failed British attack on Fort Erie, Ontario. Samuel Tozer writes from the fort on August 16, 1814, to his brother Julius in Athens,
PA:giving you an account of the battle that was faught Here yeste[Siege Fort Erie] A first-hand account of the failed British attack on Fort Erie, Ontario. Samuel Tozer writes from the fort on August 16, 1814, to his brother Julius in Athens, PA:"giving you an account of the battle that was faught Here yesterday morning. The enemy attacked our fort on both wings. They attack one fort without flints in their guns to take us by the point of the bayonet. The enemy entered one bastion of the fort with about three hundred men which was instantly blew up and they were killed and made prisoners...Our loss was about twenty men killed and and [sic] wound while the enemy lost about eight hundred or a thousand men in killed wounded and prisoners...Captain Harding...says I must tell you that he has not lost but two men out of his company." Soiled, with fold wear including minor holes and breaks. For two days, British guns fired on the fort, which the Americans had captured a month earlier. The bayonet-only attack nearly achieved the intended surprise, but Yankee pickets alerted the garrison and that British attack failed. One of the assaults captured a bastion of the fort, but as Tozer writes, a powder magazine accidentally ignited, destroying that entire section of the fort and flinging redcoats onto the bayonets of their own troops in the ditches below. The siege was far from over, however, and not until September 21, after further attacks and counter-attacks, did the British withdraw. However, unable to establish a reliable supply line, the Americans abandoned the fort in November and blew it up behind them. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $2,600.00
Will close during Public Auction
63 c   [Battle of Plattsburg Bay] September 11, 1814 folded letter with integral address leaf to Joshua Hatheway at Rome, N.Y. bearing manuscript "Georgia Spt. 27" Vermont postmark and "Free", cover with some staining and portion of address panel missing at left, fine content.The sender, under the dateline "Swanton (Vermont) Sept. 14 1814" writes: "...The Lord has been on our side giving us a complete victory over the British both by land and on water on Lake Champlain. To their disgrace they have surrendered their whole force on the water which was superior to ours in numbers...seven hundred which surrendered to out arms with a large number killed...There was but one man killed who wore the green bough...The British said that behind every tree was a Yankee firing at them..."The Battle of Plattsburg Bay, on Lake Champlain, was two battles fought on the same day - September 11, 1814 - one naval and the other on land. Although one of the very smallest actions of the war, it was one of the most decisive. With the defeat of the British fleet, General Prevost pulled out with his army, giving the Americans a complete victory. At the time of the Plattsburg Bay battles the British forces were being defeated at Baltimore and peace negotiations were taking place at Ghent, Belgium. Both British losses influenced the treaty. Est. $300-400

SOLD for $1,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
64   A Sketch of the Events which Preceded the Capture of Washington by the British. Edward D. Ingraham. Philadelphia, Carey and Hart, 1849. 8vo, half leather with marbled boards,
gilt spine. Folded map at front, frontispiece. Unusual edition withA Sketch of the Events which Preceded the Capture of Washington by the British. Edward D. Ingraham. Philadelphia, Carey and Hart, 1849. 8vo, half leather with marbled boards, gilt spine. Folded map at front, frontispiece. Unusual edition with blue paper interior, with some holograph notation corrections, probably by Ingraham, for there is also a Gift Inscription "For Edward Ingraham Rogers, from his Grandfather on his Birth-day, Aug. 16th, 1852," undoubtedly by the author. Cover lightly worn, very fine. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $350.00
Will close during Public Auction
65   Burning of Washington. Report of the Committee...to Inquire into the Causes and Particulars of the Invasion of the City of Washington... R.M. Johnson et al. Washington, A and G
Way, 1814. 8vo, ¼ leather with original boards, with period notesBurning of Washington. Report of the Committee...to Inquire into the Causes and Particulars of the Invasion of the City of Washington... R.M. Johnson et al. Washington, A and G Way, 1814. 8vo, ¼ leather with original boards, with period notes and clippings bound in at rear, including a hand-drawn map tipped to rear pastedown. Two fold-out tables. Rubbed boards, minor wear to extremities, condition is excellent, and fold-outs pristine. A unique copy of an important item. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $1,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
66 c   [Burning of Washington] The day the British burned down the White House, July 24, 1814, a British artillery officers folded letter with integral address leaf datelined HMS Royal
Oak, Patuxent River, Sept 2nd, 1814 written a few days after the[Burning of Washington] The day the British burned down the White House, July 24, 1814, a British artillery officer's folded letter with integral address leaf datelined "HMS Royal Oak, Patuxent River, Sept 2nd, 1814" written a few days after the event to Glouster, England and rated "1/2", large double oval Portsmouth ship letter handstamp applied on arrival and re-rated "1/10" for forwarding to Somers, fresh and very fine.The three page letter is a vivid eye witness account of the Battle of Bladensburg, the taking of Washington, the burning of the Capitol and the President's house written by one who took part in the action. There is much interesting detail of the composition of the British forces commanded by Major General Robert Ross, the destruction of the dock yard, arsenal and military stores by the Americans to prevent them from falling into British hands: "...On the 23rd it was determined that we should march against Washington...we pursued the enemy on the 24th who retired into Washington...In the evening, the army marched into Washington, a few muskets only being fired on us - then immediately proceeded to burn the Capitol, a most handsome, elegant building - the President's house and all the public offices - the enemy himself set fire to the dockyard arsenal and all his military storehouses and in the morning we proceeded to accomplish the destruction of the cannon and everything which had escaped the flames. The loss of the Americans must have been immense, there were seven or eight magazines blown up during the night..." (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $13,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
67 c   [The Attack on Baltimore] September 12-14, 1814 folded cover with long ten page letter to London written while on board HMS Royal Oak in the Chesapeake near Baltimore, arrived
in England with double oval crowned Ship LetterPortsmouth handstamp[The Attack on Baltimore] September 12-14, 1814 folded cover with long ten page letter to London written while on board HMS Royal Oak in the Chesapeake near Baltimore, arrived in England with double oval crowned "Ship Letter/Portsmouth" handstamp and manuscript "4/-" rate for "1 oz", cover soiling, edge wear and mended splits, very fine content.The letter, written in the form of a journal by Rear Admiral Poultney Malcolm, Commander of the troop convoy, starts on September 10th, 1814: "...the Americans must make Peace their country is just defenceless - and if we please we might destroy as much as was conceived necessary...we are now going to Baltimore...the wind is fair and I shall be at the mouth of the Patapsco tonight....16th Sept...we landed on the 12th fourteen miles from Baltimore at North Point. I took leave of General (Ross) about six miles on the road at two o'clock - at three the enemy were discovered and just as our Troops were formed an unfortunate Ball struck my esteemed and gallant friend (General Ross)...Our Army defeated the Americans but on their approach to Baltimore they found it defended by a strong intrenched camp...We had got within shot of the Batteries - but they had sunk ships to prevent our approach - our bombs could only throw shells into the Forts - they could not reach the town.. It became a question wither the camp should be stormed - it was considered that we might force the works, but that our loss would be more than our little army could stand - it was therefore resolved to retreat which they did... and there is only this to be said that on approaching Baltimore it was found to be strong and we gave up the enterprise..."Major General Robert Ross was in charge of the army troops and Vice Admiral Sir Alexander Cochrane was in overall command of the expedition as well as the North American Station. (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $6,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
68   [The Burnt Capitol, Elbridge Gerry] Gerry, Elbridge Historic Autograph Letter Signed E. Gerry as Vice President, 4 full pages, legal folio, Washington, October 21-23, 1814,
decribes the Burning of Washington and the Capitol. My dear Ann, I enc[The Burnt Capitol, Elbridge Gerry] Gerry, Elbridge Historic Autograph Letter Signed E. Gerry as Vice President, 4 full pages, legal folio, Washington, October 21-23, 1814, decribes the Burning of Washington and the Capitol. "My dear Ann, I enclose a paper (not present) which contains a letter from Governor Wright of Congress, it will shock the feeling of any savage. (I) Desire Elbridge or Thomas (his sons) to have it published in the Patriot with this addition, 'That General Stewart informed a member of the Senate that the British officers stripped young ladies at the same time, & obliged them to stand before these Cannibals an hour & an half naked & until they permitted the distressed females again to cloath themselves, and that Admiral Coburn, is Cockburn, the infamous Cockburn.' Accept with dear mamma & the Children ….. sincerely .., E. Gerry"He adds in a postscript that makes up the large majority of the letter that he saw the sisters of Mrs. Suter, who kept one of Washington's boarding houses: "who informed me that 'That General Ross with several British officers came to their Sister's House, near to the Treasury building, & to the President's house, & desired to have Coffee ready for them on their return; calling her by name, that before their return other British officers whom she had mistaken for the same, came in & seated themselves. All the officers wore grey coats over their uniforms. When General Ross, who it seems was a genteel and well behaved man of about 30 or 35 years old, came in, he appeared to be surprised. She immediately replenished her Coffee pot, of which he made her drink, before he took any.' One of the officers then told her that Admiral Coburn had gone to Quebec to take command there & enquired whether she was not rejoiced of it. She answered very much so, for that he bore the blackest Character, & was considered as an infamous monster. He then sent for General Ross, who returning with this other officer, introduced him as Admiral Cockburn. Cockburn is a man of about fifty, rude & rough in his appearance & manner. General Ross entered the President's House, he touched an elegant Piano there & said it was a pity to burn it, & proposed to have it removed to give someone an opportunity of saving it for Mrs. Madison, but Cockburn leaving the room, returned again suddenly, & hurried the officers out of the room because the building had already been fired and was unsafe. The woman 'also confirmed the fact in regard to Cockburn's extinguishing the Candles, in order to have the pleasure of taking Coffee by the lyght of the President's house"Gerry himself inspected the Capitol, where "the stair cases, balustrades, floors, entries, & partitions of which being of stone only remained, & I could not suppress a sigh. My indignation at british barbarism, which exceeds that of all other nations, ancient or modern, civilized or savage, prevented a tear." Finally, he relates that a British spy, wrapped in the habit of a nun, visited Mrs. Suter and also the First Lady, warning them to leave town and inquiring "whether the inhabitants were not afraid of them, & what force they had to resist them." Lower tenth of first page detached cleanly at fold but present. Elbridge, Gerry - Signer of the Declaration of Independence from Massachusetts (1744-1814); US Vice President under James Madison, dying in office. The British had burned Washington's major government buildings on August 24-25, but were obliged to withdraw due to a powerful storm that arrived on the second day. General Ross was killed on September 12 during an attack on Baltimore. Although Gerry is one of the more available of the Signers, this is easily the most important letter of his we have seen on the market. (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $35,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
69 c   [Battle of Chippewa] folded letter of Captain Gilbert from U.S. occupied Canada with integral address leaf and manuscript f (free) as addressed to a postmaster, datelined
Queenstown Upper Canada July 11th 1814 with a portion of an excellent t[Battle of Chippewa] folded letter of Captain Gilbert from U.S. occupied Canada with integral address leaf and manuscript "f" (free) as addressed to a postmaster, datelined "Queenstown Upper Canada July 11th 1814" with a portion of an excellent three page letter describing the Battle of Chippewa on the Niagara frontier July 3rd to the 10th: "...the afternoon of the 5th when we were attacked by the enemy forces from Chipeway amounting of about nineteen hundred regulars, 600 Indians and a few militia. The 1st Brigade under Genl. (Winfield) Scott met them and (maintained) their ground for two hours while the second Brg under Genl. Ripley were indevering to flank them. Our movement was (discovered) by the enemy which caused them to retreat with a loss of killed wounded and missing of about 614. Our loss considerable but nothing to that of the Enemy...."The letter also describes the surrender of Fort Erie on the 3rd of July. Gilbert then reports the death of General John Swift of the New York Militia, who was shot by the enemy after they had surrendered. He had been a hero in the American Revolution. Letter ends abruptly with one page missing, splits along the folds, very fine content. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $1,800.00
Will close during Public Auction
70 c   [Battles of Chippewa and Lundys Lane] two outstanding folded letters with integral address leaves, both written by Captain James Hall, 2nd Lieut. in the artillery to Thomas
Wharton at Philadelphia, with manuscript Buffalo, N.Y. postmarks and [Battles of Chippewa and Lundy's Lane] two outstanding folded letters with integral address leaves, both written by Captain James Hall, 2nd Lieut. in the artillery to Thomas Wharton at Philadelphia, with manuscript "Buffalo, N.Y." postmarks and "20" rate, the first datelined "Camp near Chipaway, July 7, 1814" written on the battlefield two days after the action with a sketch of the battlefield and troop locations and movement, the second datelined at "Buffaloe July 27, 1814" three days after the battle of Lundy's Lane which is also known as the Battle of Niagara Falls.Both are long letters with very descriptive and detailed accounts of the battles (full transcripts available), the first including: "...On the 3rd the artillery were ordered up to storm Fort Erie...Just as we arrived and were prepared to display our battery - the fort surrendered...On the 4th we marched to this place...During the morning of the 5th our pickets kept up a constant firing - about noon they made a general attack upon our right commanded by Genl. Scott ...the British advanced and displayed on the plain - the hottest of the battle then took place - both lines kept up tremendous fire - at length the British line charged. Scott also charged at the same moment...they retreated and rallied about 200 paces to the rear - they were again broken in the same manner - we pursued them for 3 miles & drove them into Fort Chippaway...Those who know better than myself say that this has been the most beautiful fight we have yet had in this war...We beat them!" The in the second letter Hall writes: "...I am ashamed to tell you that after having fought a most sanquinary battle & obtained a glorious victory our army made a disorderly and shameful retreat to Erie...Genl Brown was wounded and unfortunately for Genl. Scott also, as the command devolved upon Genl. Ripley...Brigadier General Ripley after our army had fought the most bloody battle perhaps that this country has seen - after having driven the enemy from the field & captured their Commanding Officer and all their artillery - after having in short covered themselves with Glory at the expense of blood and an immense number of brave men - Brig. Genl. Riply left the field...and retreated to Erie!" (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $9,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
71   [Battle of New Orleans] Two extraordinary letters by Robert L. Cobbs, surgeon in Andrew Jacksons army, on the movements prior to the Battle of New Orleans and on the battle
itself. Both are to his brother John in New Glasgow, Virginia. The first[Battle of New Orleans] Two extraordinary letters by Robert L. Cobbs, surgeon in Andrew Jackson's army, on the movements prior to the Battle of New Orleans and on the battle itself. Both are to his brother John in New Glasgow, Virginia. The first, written at Ft. St. Stephens (Mississippi Territory, now in Alabama) on October 4, 1814, says that in response to Jackson's request for militia:"Brig. Genl. Coffey has raised about Two thousand perhaps Twenty five hundred and marched on to Fort Montgomery which is on the Mobile about fifty miles above Mobile Town and as far below this place...The whole army took up the line of march...and in a week more perhaps...the Capture of Pensacola will be effected… I am acting at present as a surgeon extraordinary and have remain'd in that capacity about two weeks in the Chickasaw Nation and as long in the Choctaw. …" It would be a month before Jackson and his men captured Pensacola, which they achieved with little bloodshed. The Spanish governor of West Florida surrendered the town after it was flanked by Jackson's troops, which greatly outnumbered the civil garrison. From camp near New Orleans, Cobbs tells his brother on February 3, 1815 that he missed the capture of Pensacola, arriving two days late, when:"I was order'd by General Jackson to continue as acting surgeon in Coffee's Brigade. Thence we returned to Fort Montgomery. The army composed of Militia, regulars, Indians and Coffee's Brigade of mounted gunmen were here distributed...The Militia station'd at the Fort, the regulars order'd a part to Mobile and a part to N. Orleans. Some of the Militia with the Indians sent on an expedition...through the Creek nation. Coffee's Brigade after...four or five days, marched on to the Mississippi 25 miles above Baton Rouge, had been there but three or four days when news arrived...that the British wer landing below N. Orleans and an order from Jackson for the Brigade to move on day & night. Though we had mar(ched) already about 900 miles, with very little re(st)...we reached the present camp 3 miles above the city in 3 days & half, having marched about 170 miles."There they were joined by "3000 militia...from Tennessee" under Genl. William Carroll. "About 2 oclock P.M. News reached camp that the British were seen about 7 miles below the city, in half an hour the Troops were ready for a march...Within about a mile of the British the Brigade dismounted except the field and staff officers...I never heard the whizzing of balls so brisk. After the first attack the battle continued with much irregularity, several of our companies being in mistake call'd up to the enamy and several of theirs to ours. Several prisoners were taken in this manner...A number of our prisoners parol'd by the enemy, have just return'd. They report two chief-commanders dead (Generals Edward Pakenham and Samuel Gibbs) as we knew before, Major Genl. Keen (John Keane) recovering from his wound. The loss of the British as they state themselves in this expedition upwards of 3000 kill'd wounded and prisoners." He goes on to say that pleurisy, measles, and typhus are running through the ranks, and informs his brother that "Banks Anthony formerly of Bedford was killed in the battle on the 28th of Dec. by a rocket" before adding in a postscript that "The enemy lie off the passes into Lake Bourne, about 100 miles from N. Orleans. Their forces Naval & La(nd) are supposed to have been 12 or 15 thousand. The same that were at Washington & Baltimore with reinforcements. They told our prisoners that they should be reinforced and try for Orleans again. But all appearances indicated an early departure from our coast." Cobbs was quite correct. A few days after this letter, Fort Bowyer in Alabama was surrendered to the British after a brief siege, the last shots fired on land in the War of 1812. A peace treaty had been signed at Ghent in the Netherlands on December 10, though word had not yet reached the United States. First letter toned, with edge wear, seal hole (not affecting text )and several fold separations repairs. Second letter with a 2-inch piece out at the right edge of all pages, affecting sixteen lines of text. Toned, with edge wear and with fold separations and a few repairs with transparent paper. Both letters are tipped to pages in a tall folio presentation book with printed transcripts. Accompanied by a 1947 magazine article quoting the letters. Letters from this battle are extremely rare. (imagea) (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $27,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
72   [Battle of New Orleans] Great soldiers letter with integral postmarked address leaf, from Capt. C.R. Hicks to Gov. W.C.C. Claiborne, governor of Louisiana. He writes from Camp
Hopkins (probably near Donaldsonville, LA) on December 30, 1814, that[Battle of New Orleans] Great soldier's letter with integral postmarked address leaf, from Capt. C.R. Hicks to Gov. W.C.C. Claiborne, governor of Louisiana. He writes from Camp Hopkins (probably near Donaldsonville, LA) on December 30, 1814, that no enemy is near at hand, but:"from various reports, & from the roaring of cannon that are at times heard here, I am Confident that the City of Orleans is menaced and with a very Strong force, but let the force be what it may, I feel satisfied that the pride of great Britain will be again humbled...Lt. Randall of the Volunteers arrived here last evening...He made Prize of three Brute negroes, some dry goods & Bees wax. The negroes & dry goods from Grand Cheniene, the Bees Wax from on board of a Prize Schr. laying at Cat Island." With condition problems, including small holes, and seal holes at left edges of right-facing pages, obscuring some text. Overall fold wear and toning. Entered the mails two months later as integral address panel is postmarked "Donaldson Ville La / Mar. 8th. 1815" and with "15" cent war surcharge rate. With an interesting Newspaper, the Connecticut Courant of February 7, 1815, which prints dispatches from the days just before the battle. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $2,900.00
Will close during Public Auction
73 c   [Treaty of Ghent] ending the War of 1812, December, 1814 folded letter with integral address leaf datelined London 27 Decem. 1814 to Providence, R.I., postmarked on reverse with
excellent strike of scarce Post Paid Withdrawn Ship LetterLondon[Treaty of Ghent] ending the War of 1812, December, 1814 folded letter with integral address leaf datelined "London 27 Decem. 1814" to Providence, R.I., postmarked on reverse with excellent strike of scarce "Post Paid Withdrawn Ship Letter/London/30 De, 1814" handstamp, arrived five and a half months later with red "Phi/17 May" datestamp of Philadelphia and their matching "SHIP" in arc and rated "27 1/4", extremely fine and choice.Commercial letter written the day after the arrival of the Treaty of Ghent in London and the day before it was ratified by the Prince Regent - Dec. 28, 1814: "We congratulate you most sincerely on the near approach of Peace between our two countries - so long and anxiously desired - the Preliminary Treaty from the Commissioners at Ghent having arrived yesterday - has been ratified by the Prince Regent - & will be forwarded without delay, to the United States for the Signature of the President - which we cannot doubt will be obtained - until that takes place, hostilities are not to cease....We hope to get this on board the M.W. which carries out the Treaty." Tho. Dickason & Co. to Messrs. Brown & Ives, Providence R.I.The British government had a monopoly on the mails and all overseas mail had to go via a mail packet. During the years 1814 and 1815 a letter could be sent by any vessel not being a mail packet or by an individual, if it was paid and postmarked as a Post Paid Withdrawn Ship Letter. The postmark was struck, as per instructions, over the folded letter-joint to prevent further enclosures. The marking is scarce, but examples as fine as this are rare. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $4,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
74   [Blockade-Run Correspondence from an American Businessman] Interesting series of 13 letters from Alexander Mactier to his parents in Baltimore, from various places, mostly Haiti
and England, 1813-15. Mactier is in shipping, and most of his letter[Blockade-Run Correspondence from an American Businessman] Interesting series of 13 letters from Alexander Mactier to his parents in Baltimore, from various places, mostly Haiti and England, 1813-15. Mactier is in shipping, and most of his letters concern the impact of the war on business. He writes from Port-au-Prince in July 1813, "I have dispatched the Vigilant for England on the 19th with a full cargo; and it is my present intention to attned to her return, provided the next news we receive from Europe should be favorable, that is, if the Russians beat the French and Coffee maintains its price." From Aux Cayes he explains that he received twenty tons of coffee to pay off a debt. In February 1814 he says that the schooner carrying his bill of exchange to his mother has been sunk. In April he is on Bermuda waiting for a ship to England: "We shall be well protected from Capture, going with Convoy...In the event of Peace...it is not my intention to return to Hayti, but to the United States with Dry Good." He reaches his father, now in Liverpool, and reports of "the present meeting of Commissioners at Ghent" to make a peace treaty. "I am afraid they will separate without making Peace...Should this unfortunately be the case, my Father will return home by way of Halifax." In September, "The negotiations at Ghent having been broken off in consequence of the high demands of the Country." He will head west with a cargo of German linen! But in October he says he's heard "the most gloomy news...The Capture of Washington was an event unlooked for in this Country...Should the scene of War be continued in that District, I am apprehensive the British will make an attempt to destroy Baltimore...Move into the Country as soon as possible...Doubtless I have lost many of my Friends and Companions at Bladensburgh," where a Baltimore company faced the invaders. He joins a ship in Cork, and on Halloween, writes, "Thank God the British were repulsed" at Baltimore. He is in Havana when he hears of peace in March 1815, and by May is in New York, telling his mother that his father is homeward bound. With a printed photograph of Mactier in the 1880s. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,300.00
Will close during Public Auction
75   [War of 1812 Balance] A solid lot of seven letters, six documents, and five items of printed material concerning the war, 1810-78. Includes a great content autograph letter by Major W.S. Hamilton in Washington, March 9, 1813, who writes to a friend in New York about the controversial General James Wilkinson, whose troops have expressed great dissatisfaction with his failed campaigns in northern New York: "and other matters always connected with the name of Jacobus, the Cabinet hesitates what to do with him. Can he be contained in the genial south...Will the blasting north suit his shattered frame...Must Genl. H. (Wade Hampton, under whom Hamilton served) supercede him on the Mississippi?" He also reports that Tsar Alexander has offered to mediate the war. Another letter, by William Vernon of New York, discusses the financial impact of the British blockade of the Atlantic coast. The most spectacular of the documents is a large folio crew list for the brig Pickering of Gloucester, affirming each crew member's US citizenship, March 5, 1812. This was one of the last measures taken to counter British impressment of American seamen with the excuse that the sailors had deserted the English Navy. With issues of the Newspapers London Gazette, April 17-20, 1813 (with the 3½ penny revenue handstamp) with news of the destruction of HMS Java by USS Constitution; The War, New York, July 18, 1812, reporting the Congressional vote on declaring war; and the New-Hampshire Patriot of December 17, 1811, with exciting news of a "Battle on the Wabash." Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $1,900.00
Will close during Public Auction
THE AMERICAN FUR TRADE
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
76   [Fort McKenzie] Aquatint Engraving Fort Mackenzie, August 28, 1833 C. Bodmer, painter, Bougeard, publisher, Manceau and Hurlimann, engraver. Holscher in Koblenz, Ackermann in
London, Bertrand in Paris, [ca 1840]. Embossed C. Bodmer at bottom.[Fort McKenzie] Aquatint Engraving "Fort Mackenzie, August 28, 1833" C. Bodmer, painter, Bougeard, publisher, Manceau and Hurlimann, engraver. Holscher in Koblenz, Ackermann in London, Bertrand in Paris, [ca 1840]. Embossed "C. Bodmer" at bottom. Tableau 42. Matted under glass in a fine modern frame, overall size 24.5" x 27.25". This famous attack was made early in the morning by the Assiniboines upon Blackfeet encamped around the fort. The white men in charge of the fort were briefly engaged against the Assiniboins until it was clear that the fort was not the target of the attack. (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $2,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
77   [Fort Pierre] Aquatint Engraving: Fort Pierre on the Missouri, C. Bodmer, painter, Bougeard, publisher, Salathe, engraver. Holscher in Koblenz, Ackermann in London (1840),
Bertrand in Paris. With C. Bodmer embossed at bottom. Tableau 10. Aqua[Fort Pierre] Aquatint Engraving: "Fort Pierre on the Missouri," C. Bodmer, painter, Bougeard, publisher, Salathe, engraver. Holscher in Koblenz, Ackermann in London (1840), Bertrand in Paris. With "C. Bodmer" embossed at bottom. Tableau 10. Aquatint on paper, 17" x 24". Matted. The fort was one of the American Fur Company's largest settlements, and was opposite present-day Pierre, SD. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $2,200.00
Will close during Public Auction
78   Adventures on the Columbia River., Ross Cox. London, Colburn and Bentley, 1831. Two volumes. 8vo, modern æ calf with banded and gilt spines, red ribbons. Risvold labels on
pastedown and half title of volume I. Lightly foxed.Adventures on the Columbia River., Ross Cox. London, Colburn and Bentley, 1831. Two volumes. 8vo, modern æ calf with banded and gilt spines, red ribbons. Risvold labels on pastedown and half title of volume I. Lightly foxed. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $280.00
Will close during Public Auction
79   Adventures on the Columbia River., Ross Cox. New York, J & J Harper, 1832. First American edition. 8vo, green cloth. Library marks on spine and pastedown, spine label removed. Owner's 1832 note and Risvold label on front pastedown. Corner off free front endpaper. Foxed, well worn exterior. Est. $400-500

SOLD for $240.00
Will close during Public Auction
80   Two Washington Irving Books, Two choice works on the early western exploration and the fur trade. Though often neglected by historians (their geography is sometimes suspect), these are valuable contemporary sources. His books: The Rocky Mountains: or, Scenes, Incidents, and Adventures in the Far West. Philadelphia, Carey, Lea, & Blanchard, 1837. First American edition. Two volumes. 12mo, cloth with paper labels on spines. Each volume with fold-out map. Owner's label on pastedowns. Volume I map torn at anchor but still attached. Both with faded spines, cover soiling and wear, some foxing throughout. With Astoria, or Anecdotes of an Enterprise Beyond the Rocky Mountains. NY, Putnamís, 1897. Tacoma edition. Two volumes. 8vo, original red cloth designed by Margaret Armstrong. Risvold labels on pastedowns. Some foxing. Est. $300-400

SOLD for $350.00
Will close during Public Auction

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