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EXPLORATION AND WAR continued...

THE INDIAN WARS continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
301   [Dakota Reserve] Outstanding hand-drawn Map: Dakota or Sioux Indians Reserve along the St. Peters River, according to treaties of 1850 and 51 (both ratified 1853). It shows the
land to which the Native Americans are reserved, extending from the[Dakota Reserve] Outstanding hand-drawn Map: "Dakota or Sioux Indians Reserve" along the St. Peters River, according to treaties of 1850 and 51 (both ratified 1853). It shows the land to which the Native Americans are reserved, extending from the Little Rock River to Lake Travers. Ink on oilcloth, backed with heavy cloth for preservation. Overall size 15.1" x 19.75". With a few pieces out not affecting any details. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $6,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
302   [Dakota Sioux Treaty] Manuscript proclamation signed with the marks of five chiefs, 1853. It reads, We the Chief and Braves of the Walipitouway Dakotas of Lacquiparle (a lake
that is a widening of the Minnesota River, and site of a mission)[Dakota Sioux Treaty] Manuscript proclamation signed with the marks of five chiefs, 1853. It reads, "We the Chief and Braves of the Walipitouway Dakotas of Lacquiparle (a 'lake' that is a widening of the Minnesota River, and site of a mission) do of our own accord hereby signify our assent and consent to that part of the treaty of 1851, which gives a portion to the Traders and half breeds, and we desire that it may be carried into effect as speedially as possible, in testimony of which we hereto affix our names and marks." Signed by the marks of Uspiyahduya, Noypakinyas, Wakanmani, Malipiyuas'kays'ka, and Liyalipiya. The writing, by SR Riggs, who signs as a witness, makes the unfamiliar names difficult to identify with certainty. There is also a suspicion that Riggs added the marks as well, which little differ from one another. With a period map (pre-1847) of the United States, whose western borders are the Missouri Territory, Indian Territory, and Texas. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $6,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
303   [Spirit Lake Massacre] Volunteer JLN McFarlanes certificate of seventeen days service and discharge, signed by John F. Duncombe, captain of Company B, Fort Dodge, Iowa, April
21, 1857. Some ink smearing and one spot of discoloration. Capt. Dunc[Spirit Lake Massacre] Volunteer JLN McFarlane's certificate of seventeen days' service and discharge, signed by John F. Duncombe, captain of Company B, Fort Dodge, Iowa, April 21, 1857. Some ink smearing and one spot of discoloration. Capt. Duncombe and his men were among the relief expedition sent to protect the settlers who had been attacked. During the march, the captain became severely ill and had to return to camp. Traveling through a blizzard, the main party only went as far as present-day Emmettsburg when a group of scouts met with survivors of the massacre and brought them back. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $210.00
Will close during Public Auction
304   [Spirit Lake Massacre] Balance lot of items, including letters, documents, and printed items. Also with the Book: History of the Spirit Lake Massacre! A. Gardner. Des Moines,
Iowa Printing Co., 1885. 8vo, original cloth with gilt title design[Spirit Lake Massacre] Balance lot of items, including letters, documents, and printed items. Also with the Book: History of the Spirit Lake Massacre! A. Gardner. Des Moines, Iowa Printing Co., 1885. 8vo, original cloth with gilt title design, spine. Engraved frontis. Rebacked. Risvold label on pastedown. With an earlier edition of the same: History of the Spirit Lake Massacre! New Britain CT, LP Lee, 1857 - 8vo, printed wraps, 48 pp (including "appendix" page). (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $1,350.00
Will close during Public Auction
305 c   [In the Wake of Spirit Lake] cover to Salem, N.Y. with 3c Dull red (11, faults) tied by Traverse des Sioux, M.T.Apr 16 datestamp, with original 1857 letter, cover with flap
missing and edges archivally reinforced, fine.James Hinds writes to h[In the Wake of Spirit Lake] cover to Salem, N.Y. with 3c Dull red (#11, faults) tied by "Traverse des Sioux, M.T./Apr 16" datestamp, with original 1857 letter, cover with flap missing and edges archivally reinforced, fine.James Hinds writes to his parents on 13 April, 1857: "...Early on Sunday morning (yesterday) a messenger came in from Mankato (15 miles above) with word that the Sioux Indians had killed and burned every thing before them up as far as the Watonwon River 10 miles west of Mankato - 20 miles from here and that an immediate attack was expected upon the town of Mankato. The allarm was given by Ringing bells firing guns &c which called out some 500 men all armed and Equipped. A Commander was elected an at Eleven O'clock the Company started for Mankato with provisions &c for 20 day siege. Capt. McLeoud and myself left on horse in, advance of the main body - reached M(ankato) at dark. A skirmish with the Sioux Band numbering 700 warriors was had in the morning on the Mankato Band 10 miles west of Mankato. Some on both sides killed. The Company being fortified we left at midnight for Traverse after a larger Company. Rode for 20 miles through a storm sleet drifting full in our faces. Reached home at 2 this morning. The women and children have all left their homes and fortified in stone buildings here in town. As soon as we returned the Allarm bells were again rung and a company of horse 100 strong will be ready to start at Eleven 'Clock. I am enlisted as a private during the war. Guards surround the town day and night, and consternation and dread find a place in every heart… I have had but little rest for 2 weeks and feel somewhat tired. But duty calls all who can go - and go I shall let the result be as it may..." (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $1,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
306 c   [Spirit Lake Massacre] cover to Algona, Iowa with manuscript Spirit Lake Iowa Apr 26 datestamp and endorsed Free, R.U. Wheelock P.M., with 1859 letter by postmaster Wheelock
regarding the failure of the mails due to almost impassible roads. I[Spirit Lake Massacre] cover to Algona, Iowa with manuscript "Spirit Lake Iowa Apr 26" datestamp and endorsed "Free, R.U. Wheelock P.M.", with 1859 letter by postmaster Wheelock regarding the failure of the mails due to almost impassible roads. It was Robert Wheelock and two other men who discovered on 16 March, 1859 the bloodshed and terror that was the Spirit Lake Massacre. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $130.00
Will close during Public Auction
307   [JEB Stuart chases Kiowas] Stuart, J.E.B. The future Confederate cavalryman reports a scouting mission in July 1860. Autograph Letter Signed J.E.B. Stuart  1st Lt. 1st Cav.
Comdg detachment, 3 pages, 4to, Camp seven miles above Bents For[JEB Stuart chases Kiowas] Stuart, J.E.B. The future Confederate cavalryman reports a scouting mission in July 1860. Autograph Letter Signed "J.E.B. Stuart / 1st Lt. 1st Cav. / Com'd'g detachment," 3 pages, 4to, "Camp seven miles above Bent's Fort," (Kansas Territory, present day Colorado) July 12, 1860. To the adjutant of Maj. John Sedgwick, he writes:"The column...marched directly north from Bent's Fort in the direction in which the Kiowa war-chief 'Lotanke' was reported to have just fled with his family - in all two lodges. I soon found the train and commenced a rapid pursuit. In a short time I came in sight of them several miles ahead just as they...prepared for more rapid flight. I saw that my pursuit...must be rapid, and followed at full gallop...After 2-1/2 hours from Bent's Fort, during which I had traversed 26 miles, I was just about overhauling the body of Indians when I recognized Capt. Steele's Detachment who were returning...from a two-days scout, and were approaching me, directly in front of the Indians...I turned to the right in order to catch some scattered warriors...I had not proceeded far however till I saw that part of Capt. Steele's command having mistaken my detachment for Kiowas were coming after us at a charge...I had already had several calls sounded but they were not heard. They recognized us on nearer approach, and...the two columns...joined in pursuit of the common foe...Two warriors were killed and one Squaw taken prisoner." Steele's men captured sixteen women and children and two dozen ponies. Stuart concludes that Lotanke was not with the group they found. Letter partially separated at hinge. Otherwise clean and crisp. Stuart is uncommon in pre-war letters. Stuart, J.E.B. - American cavalryman (1833-64); a member of the US cavalry who had served in the west against Native Americans, he resigned in 1861 to join the Confederacy; gained renown with his daring ride around the entire Union army in 1862; distinguished himself at Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and the Wilderness; killed in action at Yellow Tavern, Virginia; widely considered the South's greatest regular cavalry commander. (imagea) (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $5,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
308   [Civil War and the Sioux Uprising, Cheetam Correspondence] Exceptional group of 61 Autograph Letters, most with original covers, 33 of them by Civil War soldier Thomas J.
Cheetham (all 1862-63), the balance family letters to and from his wife, Ma[Civil War and the Sioux Uprising, Cheetam Correspondence] Exceptional group of 61 Autograph Letters, most with original covers, 33 of them by Civil War soldier Thomas J. Cheetham (all 1862-63), the balance family letters to and from his wife, Mary. The first two are from Mary in 1855 and 1856 as she and Thomas move to Anoka, Minnesota. The first letter of note is on patriotic stationery to Mary, who like many Minnesotans has gone away to stay with family until the trouble settles down. Cheetham reports that: "They talk of sending us up the Mississippi to fight the Sew Indians. They are at making a very bad work up there from Sixty to a hundred mile from Anoka. They have killed a good many men. They have burned meny buildens. They have taken some women priseners and cut their brests off and let them go and even worse then that."Sioux attacks on settlements had begun in the summer. On September 26, the uprising was put down decisively, and 303 Sioux were convicted of war crimes in November. Only 38 were hanged, on December 26. Cheetham is soon moved farther north to the Chippewa Agency and reports on Christmas that he has heard the Sioux leader "little crow has got four thousand camped within three days march of fort Abercomber (sic, Abercrombie) and they expect a fight there soon." Later he reports: "They say they will die before they will leave theare ground they are on now. … I think we shall have a hard time with them in the spring if not before but we are not in very good shape. We have to bring out water from the river … and they can shoot us every time we go down there."As the spring comes on, trouble with the Native Americans begins again, including robberies and isolated murders, and even the interruption of mail service. By July 15, despite the killing of Little Crow on July 3:"The Siux are making trouble again. They have killed several men and wimmen the last week. …The wood is full of solders now and will get some of them. Government offers 25 dollars a scelp for them." Here his letters stop abruptly, but a letter from the following December shows he is still on duty in Minnesota. Some minor faults. An unusual group, as the soldier is near home while his wife has gone to live elsewhere. With a photograph identified as Cheetham from later life. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $10,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
309   [Sioux War] Pair of choice content letters on Native American attacks in Iowa, 1862. Both are by Edwin Bruce, a physician, to Governor Samuel Kirkwood, both on the same day,
August 28, 1862. He writes of a Despert Massacre of our frontier sett[Sioux War] Pair of choice content letters on Native American attacks in Iowa, 1862. Both are by Edwin Bruce, a physician, to Governor Samuel Kirkwood, both on the same day, August 28, 1862. He writes of a "Despert Massacre of our frontier settlers...At the first house we found one man killed and one boy wounded - at the second two killed and at the third house one woman and three children - at the fourth one man. Some of the dead ware shot through the head, some through the heart and lungs, and some ware shot with buck shot. One little boy had his brains dashed out against the end of a log...Two wounded children were taken to Spirit lake. One has since died and the other will undoubtedly die. The like of barbarous brutality I never wittnessed before...We are out of arms and out of amonition...I was captin of the force sent to releive the settlers. If we cant get powder lead and caps and arms we might abandon our settle ments." In the second note, he sums up: "In all 10 dead and two wounded and 7 missing. The North Settlers here are abandoning there houses as fast as they can...I am about out of Medicines and have no Instrements." (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $850.00
Will close during Public Auction
310   [Fort Abercrombie] Manuscript orders signed by AAG Irvin McDowell, 2 pages and 2 lines, Army Headquarters, June 24, 1858, establishing a military post known as Fort Abercrombie
in the wake of the Spirit Lake Massacre. The fort would be an impor[Fort Abercrombie] Manuscript orders signed by AAG Irvin McDowell, 2 pages and 2 lines, Army Headquarters, June 24, 1858, establishing "a military post known as Fort Abercrombie" in the wake of the Spirit Lake Massacre. The fort would be an important post during the Sioux War of 1862. With modern reproduction of an old drawing of the fort. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $290.00
Will close during Public Auction
311 c   [The Indian Frontier and the Civil War, Cady Correspondence] The impressive archive of correspondence of Private James E. Cady, 1862-65, 150 letters, many with original covers,
some patriotic designs, many of which bear scarcer Fort Abercrombie p[The Indian Frontier and the Civil War, Cady Correspondence] The impressive archive of correspondence of Private James E. Cady, 1862-65, 150 letters, many with original covers, some patriotic designs, many of which bear scarcer Fort Abercrombie postmarks. James was eighteen years old when he emlisted in the Eighth Minnesota Volunteer Regiment. The following sketch is based on his 150 letters addressed to his "folks back home." Fifty-seven were dispatched from the Indian frontier, and forty-three from the greater war in the South.The Eighth was organized almost simultaneously with the Sioux outbreak in Minnesota. Instead of going south to fight, the troops were rushed to the Indian frontier. The ten companies of the Eighth were sent to various places as the situation warranted. James's company "G" was marched to Fort Abercrombie on the Red River in Dakota Territory.The following excerpts give a flavor of the graphic correspondence. From a letter datelined "Ft. Abercrombie Sept. 29, 1862...They had some fighting with the Indians yesterday in which two men were killed and one wounded. We...found a man that was killed by the Indians lying on a side hill all cut and stabed with knives his head cut off and was shot twice...Saw the Indians run up to him then drag him by the heals off to the hill his head was found whare he was shot mostly skined. We took it to whare the body was. We stoped that night at one of Burbanks stations which had been burned up one man was shot there some three weeks ago some men buried the body about one week after. When we got there the grave had been dug open and a large stick jamed into the coffin and the corps cut all to peices...The next day we reached the Ft not however without seeing some Indians all of which done the best running they could, one party of 13 were so close that we could see clearly that they were dressed in U.S. uniforms with U.S. rifles...When we got to the Ft we heard that they had had a fight in the morning with the Indians. a party, of men out of the Ft of 30 went acrost the river and were attacked by 50 Indians and too men killed and one wounded they could not tell wheather they killed any Indians or not as every one that they shot at would fall at the flash of the gun. our men had to leave their dead on the field. this morning a company or two went over after them. they found them all cut to peices. one was scalped and his whiskers taken off and a peice of flesh taken from his hip to his knee and the calf of his leg also. One was not scalped, but his hands and head were cut off, and he was opened his hart and entralls were taken out, his head hands and heart were put inside of him."When the Eighth arrived at Fort Abercrombie, it found only a group of buildings without a stockade and the garrison under constant alert against an Indian attack. One of the first big chores was to build a stockade around the fort; and James detailed this in his letters. He also told of the mails being carried by dog teams in the winter, of supplies being shipped by steamboat fifty miles north to Georgetown, Dakota.After more than eighteen months' service all companies of the Eighth were assembled at Fort Ridgley, in Southern Minnesota, preparatory to joining General Sully in his great Indian Expedition of 1864. They marched overland from Fort Ridgley to a point on the Missouri River that was to become Fort Rice. Starting July 19th General Sully marched up the Cannon Ball River for several days, and then across the plains to the Heart River in search of Indians. He left his supply train on the Heart, and headed north to the Knife River, where he found them encamped at Tah-kah-o-kuty, or Killdeer Mountain. In his letter of September 10, James E. Cady wrote: "On the 28th July we ran on to a camp of from three to five thousand warriors with their families… we killed 113 and probily many more ran off to die." On returning to Fort Rice General Sully learned that an emigrant train of eighty to one hundred wagons was besieged by Indians about two hundred miles west of the Missouri. This train was headed for Idaho and was led by Captain James L. Fisk. James was one of the men selected from the Eighth, while the balance of those not selected returned to Fort Snelling and the war in the South. After rescuing the emigrants, the troops returned to the Missouri, then floated down river on flatboats to Sioux City, Iowa. Here they received orders to rejoin their regiment in the South.From Sioux City they marched overland to Dubuque, Iowa. On November 26, he wrote that he had rejoined his regiment at Murfreesboro, Tennessee and that they had gone into winter quarters. On December 8, he wrote in great detail about the battle of Murfreesboro: "We were then ordered by the right flank and swung arround to the end of the R's (rebels) unfinished brest works. then we went into them by charges they were in the woods throwing grape and canister shell and solid shot at us while we were in an open coten field, we falling down every time they fired, we got up most to the woods then we layed down flat in the open coten field and gave them a continual roar of muskettery for fifteen minutes two co's on our right got up to run...we had 5 men wounded while lying on the coton field, and one killed (Marshal Veeder) he was shot through the head, throwning his brains all over..."The Eighth arrived in Washington the last day of March looking so rough and tough that they were dubbed "Sherman's Woodticks." On February 17 James wrote a letter to his little brother, Hobart, on the back of two large hand-colored valentines. On February 23 he wrote from on board the steamship Aerial that he was headed for Moorehead City, North Carolina, and Sherman's Army. In later letters he described some of the action around Kingston and the exciting times resulting from Sherman's march to the sea. From this point on the Eighth served as a military police force for the victorious Union Army.So after almost three long years James E. Cady and the Eighth Minnesota came home from a long and varied service extending from Fort Snelling to the mouth of the Yellowstone in Montana, to Tennessee, Washington, Fort Fisher, and North Carolina. From Northern Indians to Southern rebels, the Eighth saw a greater variety of service and traveled more miles than any other regiment in the United States Army. (imagea) (Image) Est. $7,500-10,000

SOLD for $27,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
312   [Sioux Uprising] Choice Document Signed by Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, November 9, 1862. He appoints Arthur H. Mills of St. Paul assistant quartermaster with the rank of
captain. With document signed by Governor Alex. Ramsey of Minnesota,[Sioux Uprising] Choice Document Signed by Secretary of War "Edwin Stanton," November 9, 1862. He appoints Arthur H. Mills of St. Paul assistant quartermaster with the rank of captain. With document signed by Governor "Alex. Ramsey" of Minnesota, naming Mills quartermaster "of Indian Expedition" and first lieutenant, August 19, 1862. With a related document and its transmittal envelope. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $280.00
Will close during Public Auction
313 c   [Sioux War, 1862] two covers, first endorsed Soldiers Letter, Wm. Crooks, Col 6th Min. Vol. by William Crooks while in the field commanding the 6th Minnesota Volunteers during
the Indian Wars following the Sioux uprising, entered the mails with[Sioux War, 1862] two covers, first endorsed "Soldiers Letter, Wm. Crooks, Col 6th Min. Vol." by William Crooks while in the field commanding the 6th Minnesota Volunteers during the Indian Wars following the Sioux uprising, entered the mails with double circle "Saint Paul, Min/Sep 6, 1862" datestamp and "3" rate handstamp to Red Wing, Minnesota, the other with manuscript "Sioux Agency Min, Mar 24/62" postmark and 3c Rose (#65, corner missing) with original enclosure to Saint Paul, very fine. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $425.00
Will close during Public Auction
314   [Sioux War] Great letter by a soldier who has just gone on a raid and will be present at the execution of the leaders of the muderous band of Dakotas. He writes his family from
Fort Ridgely on November 10, 1862:I have been with the Regt. on a[Sioux War] Great letter by a soldier who has just gone on a raid and will be present at the execution of the leaders of the muderous band of Dakotas. He writes his family from Fort Ridgely on November 10, 1862:"I have been with the Regt. on a ten days expedition into the Indian country...We returned ..followed in two or three days by the whole camp of 1500 solders, 400 indian prisoners & 1500 squaws & papooses. We...supposed that we should remain there till the trial & execution of the savages was accomplished...The order came to march next morning to Lake 'Shtek'..to make that point HdQrs of the expedition, thence to send out smaller ones westward to bury the dead (the settlers killed by the Sioux massacres that spread across the state) of Aug. 20." Near New Ulm, "we found here the homes of seven families - some 45 persons of whom 15 were killed - 12 taken prisoners (6 of whom have been recovered)...The men all killed or wounded but one...One woman wounded twice & beat on the head till apparently dead was saved to rech the settlements & die." (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $2,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
315   [Sioux War] Outstanding trio of content letters from Rev. Gideon H. Pond to Dr. TS Williamson, both missionaries to the Sioux, concerning Native American prisoners who were
captured or who surrendered, ending the Sioux War, also known as the Dako[Sioux War] Outstanding trio of content letters from Rev. Gideon H. Pond to Dr. TS Williamson, both missionaries to the Sioux, concerning Native American prisoners who were captured or who surrendered, ending the Sioux War, also known as the Dakota Uprising. Pond writes from Bloomington, MN on December 9, 1862, that he has not seen John Other Day, a Sioux who had long worked for peace, because the warrior had not stopped nearby for long, and "I have not been to the Ft. since the Ind's arrived i.e, Fort Snelling, where the Native Americans, taken into custody after the defeat of their uprising, were imprisoned). We hoped John would have been here before now, but learn from the Ind's that he is very busy trying to render them service...The number who sympathize with them is very small." He writes of the Natives on February 21, 1863, "I feel anxious to hear how the poor fellows get along...I hope they will...show as much regard & as much more affection for our God...than they did for the Medicine Sack. Otherday I suppose has gone Washington." In the last letter, February 29, "There will be great suffering among the exiles at Fort Thompson (Dakota Territory) before they will see a time of prosperity...such as they enjoyed before the Indian war...Little Six (Chief Shakpay) and his adherents are by this thime convinced that he can't exterminate the Isantaiki..." With three carte-de-visite Photographs of chiefs who had central roles in the massacres committed by the Sioux; all three were hanged. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $5,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
316   [Sioux War, John Other Day] Choice letter discussing a meeting with the chief, 1863. James Hinds writes his mother from St. Peter that he rode on the stage and John Other Day
whose picture I sent you...and who saved so many lives at the massac[Sioux War, John Other Day] Choice letter discussing a meeting with the chief, 1863. James Hinds writes his mother from St. Peter that he rode on the stage and John "Other Day whose picture I sent you...and who saved so many lives at the massacre last fall came up in the Stage with me. He has just returned from Washington where he married a white lady. He was with our forces in the battle at Birch Coolie last fall and while in the advance had his horse shot under him but...took three Indian Ponies and brought them into camp...He is a good Indian and was the one who captured the white women who were taken prisoners by the Indians in 1857 (in the Silver Lake Massacre). There were two women came up in the Stage with us wo were saved by him last fall. One of them was the daughter of Major (Joseph R.) Brown - a quarter blood Indian and the most beautiful lady I ever saw..." (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $2,200.00
Will close during Public Auction
317 c   [The Sioux War and Massacre] the Lt. Benjamin Butler correspondence and papers, comprised of dozens of letters and covers to him from the 1850s to the 1880s, the most
interesting of which are three letters from his wife Lida (Eliza Tucker) du[The Sioux War and Massacre] the Lt. Benjamin Butler correspondence and papers, comprised of dozens of letters and covers to him from the 1850's to the 1880's, the most interesting of which are three letters from his wife "Lida" (Eliza Tucker) during the Indian insurgency of 1862-62 to Butler while fighting for the Union in the Civil War in Mississippi in the summer of 1862, also includes photos of both from the early 1860's.In one great letter Lida Butler writes under the dateline: "Fairhaven, Minn August 29th /62...We went to Clear Water expected the Indians would be here before night - The men commenced a Fort here…There is the greatest excitment in Minnesota that ever was known in the world - every town is bulding a fortification." Lydia then names the families that are leaving because of the Indian war …There were three wounded men stayed here last night - two will probably die - ones name was Foot - one groaned all night suffered intensly - it was horrid how Foots wife kept fifteen Indians away from the house - she was slightly wounded - she was here yesterday and told us all the particulars about it - she would cry as though her heart would brake - there neighbors family were nearly all killed. They took two girls prisoners - one twelve the other seventeen. The Indians shamefully abused the oldest - took every rag of her clothes off and used her all night - it makes my blood boil - I wish I could have the priviladge of popping one over...if I had a gun and could get a chance to fire at an Indian (I would...its awful - there has one thousand Cavelery gone up the Minnesota River and the sixth Regiment and four companys beside - they arnt going to leave until every Sioux is dead...Since I commenced this letter (was a) girl the Indians took and abused so has come here to stay all night, poor girl I pitty her she looks so sad..." (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $2,200.00
Will close during Public Auction
318 c   [Sioux War, 1863] cover to St. Marys, Ohio with horizontal strip of three 1c Blue (63) tied by brown grids, with matching Crow Wing, MinnJan 21 datestamp, with original letter
about Indian uprising, extremely fine.Under the dateline Crow Win[Sioux War, 1863] cover to St. Marys, Ohio with horizontal strip of three 1c Blue (#63) tied by brown grids, with matching "Crow Wing, Minn/Jan 21" datestamp, with original letter about Indian uprising, extremely fine.Under the dateline "Crow Wing, Jan 19th 1863" the writer reports that: "...The Indians showed Warlike demonstrations By killing all the Cattle a Bout Ottertrail - Robbing all the Sitizens - taking Horses - all so took some prisoners at Leech Lake - did not kill any one...Woman and children was ordered to Fort...Indians said they was in fun!" (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $500.00
Will close during Public Auction
319 c   [Chippawa Agency during the 1862-63 Sioux War] correspondence of six letters and five covers from James Cheetham to his wife in Plainville, Mass. written from the Chippewa
Agency, Manannah and Fort Ripley, Minnesota during the Indian uprising bet[Chippawa Agency during the 1862-63 Sioux War] correspondence of six letters and five covers from James Cheetham to his wife in Plainville, Mass. written from the Chippewa Agency, Manannah and Fort Ripley, Minnesota during the Indian uprising between December 6th, 1862 and June 13th, 1863, covers with 3c Rose (#65, one faulty), two with manuscript Chippewa Agency postmarks, one with manuscript Manannah postmark, one with Fort Ripley datestamp and last carried from Manannah by military express entering the mails with Forest City datestamp, fine.Excerpts from the letters include: "Dec. 6th...the Indians are paid off and we have had no trobble with them...April 8th...the siux are around hear...they killed three soldiers and one citison week before last...there was thirty cavely went after them but could not find them...if I am killed by these red skins I hope I may get one first if no more." With his April 18th letter Cheetham includes a large pencil drawing of the Chippawa Agency (still present) and goes on the describe the scene he has drawn: "I am standing gard with a gun in my hand - them are all squaes (Indian women) you see there with dresses on and Indians on the wood pile - the bigest one on the wood (pile) is hol in the day the big cheaf that has made all the trobble with the chippeways - there is some of our boys standing in frunt of the quarters." In the last letter of June 13th Cheetham describes the death of his Captain, John S. Cady, by the Indians on June 11th.Chippewa, Minnesota Post Office was located at the Chippewa Agency in Cass County. It was established on December 7th, 1861 and discontinued on July 22, 1868. The Crow Wing Agency was at the confluence of the two rivers about five miles by road from the Chippewa Agency. Fort Ripley was about fifteen miles south of the Chippewa Agency on the west bank of the Mississippi. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $3,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
320 c   [Chief Hole-in-the-day] buff cover with 3c Rose (65) tied by waffle grid, with matching Saint Paul, MinNov 12 datestamp alongside addressed to Hole in the Day, Chief of
Chippewas, Crow Wing, Minn., slightly reduced at left and light stain a[Chief Hole-in-the-day] buff cover with 3c Rose (#65) tied by waffle grid, with matching "Saint Paul, Min/Nov 12" datestamp alongside addressed to "Hole in the Day, Chief of Chippewas, Crow Wing, Minn.," slightly reduced at left and light stain at lower right, fine; also includes a photo of the chief on railway advertising card.Hole-in-the-day was chief of the Pillager band of the Chippewa Indians at Crow Wing. He was one of the insurgent leaders among the Indians during the uprising and was assassinated by members of his tribe on June 17, 1868 at Crow Wing. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $550.00
Will close during Public Auction

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