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EXPLORATION AND WAR continued...

THE INDIAN WARS continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
321   [Indian Fur Trade] One letter and one document concerning later trading with Native Americans and the hiring of a scout, both from Fort Union on the Missouri near Yellowstone,
1866 and 1867. Pierre Hawk agrees to work for Gregory Bruguier & Goewe[Indian Fur Trade] One letter and one document concerning later trading with Native Americans and the hiring of a scout, both from Fort Union on the Missouri near Yellowstone, 1866 and 1867. Pierre Hawk agrees to work for Gregory Bruguier & Goewey "at 75.00 per Month and one Ration, as Interpreter & Trader at Ft. Union." His ration is 10 lb flour and 2 lb coffee, and 4 lb sugar, all weekly, as well as tobacco to smoke with Native Americans. The letter, January 1867, is to Geowey from Indian trader John Kerler, asking him to procure important supplies and trade items. He expects the Cut Head to trade, who have many buffalo robes, as well as the Assinaboines and the Crows. With much more interesting detail. Fort Union had been established by the American Fur Company's Kenneth McKenzie in 1865, and was sold to the US government in 1867. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,600.00
Will close during Public Auction
322   Parker, Ely, Two manuscript letters signed as US Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1870 and 1871. Both are to Robert Campbell, merchant and former fur trader, in St. Louis. The
first gives his instructions for establishing of agencies for Red CloudParker, Ely, Two manuscript letters signed as US Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1870 and 1871. Both are to Robert Campbell, merchant and former fur trader, in St. Louis. The first gives his instructions for establishing of agencies for Red Cloud's and Spotted Tail's bands of Sioux. Parker believes that Raw Hide Buttes would be the best site, upon the Indians' lands, rather than putting the agencies in a government fort. The second letter concerns a bill Campbell has submitted to the Dept. of the Interior, which Parker finds in good order and has approved. Parker, Ely - Iroquois/Seneca chief, US soldier, and US government official (1828-95); trained as an engineer and began work for the government, meeting Ulysses S. Grant in Galena, Illinois; was his military secretary during the Civil War, and personally penned the terms of surrender signed by Robert E. Lee; named Commissioner of Indian Affairs by Grant as president, the only Native American to hold that post. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $2,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
323   [George Armstrong Custer] Scarce Civil War war-date carte-de-visite Photograph Signed Truly your friend  G.A. Custer  Bvt Maj. Genl. on photographic surface below image. A
handsome photograph of an engraving based on his 1864 photograph by Ma[George Armstrong Custer] Scarce Civil War war-date carte-de-visite Photograph Signed "Truly your friend / G.A. Custer / Bvt Maj. Genl." on photographic surface below image. A handsome photograph of an engraving based on his 1864 photograph by Matthew Brady. Printed by Brady. This photograph was inscribed for Brevet Lt. Col. Robert Burns, who served with Custer in the US Cavalry. Since Custer reverted to his regular army rank after the close of the war, we can date this to the final days of the conflict; when mustered out of the volunteers, Custer reverted to the regular army rank of captain. In exceptional condition. Custer, George Armstrong - American soldier (1839-76); after a West Point career he was commissioned a second lieutenant in the US Cavalry; served with Genl. Philip H. Sheridan in the Overland Campaign, the Shenandoah Valley, and the chase to Appomattox; mostly remembered for his doomed attack at Little Bighorn on a Sioux village; outnumbered at least three to one and cut off from reinforcements, Custer and his cavalry were annihilated; his "last stand" has subsequently become an American legend. (Image) Est. $10,000-15,000

SOLD for $24,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
324   [George Armstrong Custer] Choice Civil War-date carte-de-visite Photograph of Custer by Mathew Brady, published by E. & H.T. Anthony of New York. A ca.1864 image of Custer,
waist-length, in profile facing left. Two-cent orange (R14) revenue stam[George Armstrong Custer] Choice Civil War-date carte-de-visite Photograph of Custer by Mathew Brady, published by E. & H.T. Anthony of New York. A ca.1864 image of Custer, waist-length, in profile facing left. Two-cent orange (#R14) revenue stamp on verso. Minor surface dusting, with a small bump from a divot in the verso. Overall in sharp condition. Custer's shoulder bar is blanked out, probably to reflect his promotions in rank since the original photograph was taken. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $675.00
Will close during Public Auction
325   [George Armstrong Custer] Choice date carte-de-visite Photograph by Mora of New York. A head-and-shoulders close-up of the fierce Indian-fighter as lieutenant colonel, in his
elaborate gold braid dated in pencil on lower mount as Gen. Custer [George Armstrong Custer] Choice date carte-de-visite Photograph by Mora of New York. A head-and-shoulders close-up of the fierce Indian-fighter as lieutenant colonel, in his elaborate gold braid; dated in pencil on lower mount as "Gen. Custer / 1876." Mounting traces on verso. Minor surface imperfections. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $1,600.00
Will close during Public Auction
326   Sitting Bull, Rare cabinet card Photograph Signed on verso by the Sioux war chief who spent his later years as a living legend of the Old West. An image of him seated with a
peace pipe lying across his knees and a printed signature on blank margiSitting Bull, Rare cabinet card Photograph Signed on verso by the Sioux war chief who spent his later years as a living legend of the Old West. An image of him seated with a peace pipe lying across his knees and a printed signature on blank margin below image. However, it is signed in earnest on verso, along with two owners' notes, one stating that the autograph was acquired at Thunder Hawk Creek in Dakota, 1885. With some condition issues, including a crack along the lower edge, not affecting signature. With twelve letters, maps, and printed items about the later years of conflict between Native Americans and the United States. (imagea) (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $10,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
327   The Crockett Almanac, 1839, Ben Harding, Nashville, [1838]. Volume II, no. 1. 8vo, illustrated wraps, the front cover showing An Unexpected Ride on the Horns of an Elk, the
back, A Scentoriferous Fight with a Nigger. With severalThe Crockett Almanac, 1839, Ben Harding, Nashville, [1838]. Volume II, no. 1. 8vo, illustrated wraps, the front cover showing "An Unexpected Ride on the Horns of an Elk," the back, "A Scentoriferous Fight with a Nigger." With several other images within. String-bound. Some edge wear and foxing. A rare item. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
328   [Republic of Texas, $500.00 Banknote] This is the largest denomination issued by the Republic of Texas between 1839 and 1841, most likely in order to replace the Government of
Texas notes that had been issued in 1838. This example grades Extrem[Republic of Texas, $500.00 Banknote] This is the largest denomination issued by the Republic of Texas between 1839 and 1841, most likely in order to replace the "Government of Texas" notes that had been issued in 1838. This example grades Extremely Fine, with a deftly replaced cut-out cancel at lower left that is however noticed easily from the back due to the tape repair. A large Texas Star is printed in red-orange on back, as this was the first issue of notes to feature any printing on back. Vignettes on front are of Commerce and Plenty at top, and Liberty with pole, Liberty cap, Texas Shield and Eagle at right. Secretarial signature of Mirabeau Lamar as President at lower right. (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $4,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
329   [Texas Banknotes] Group features a pair of Government of Texas notes, issued in 1838, both with secretarial signatures of Sam Houston (by William G. Cooke) as President, and of
Henry Smith, known as the first American governor of Texas, as Treasu[Texas Banknotes] Group features a pair of Government of Texas notes, issued in 1838, both with secretarial signatures of Sam Houston (by William G. Cooke) as President, and of Henry Smith, known as the first American governor of Texas, as Treasurer. Remaining foursome are Republic of Texas notes issued in 1839-1841. Three notes have tape covering the typical cut-cancels found on the vast majority of Texas notes, while the fourth note is heavily circulated without tape repairs. Grades range from very good to very fine. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,200.00
Will close during Public Auction
330   Austin, Stephen F., An incredible content Autograph Letter Signed, Raising Troops for Texas, Stephen F. Austin, 3 full pages, 4to, Nashville, TN, February 25, 1836. With
integral postmarked address leaf. Less than a year before his death, hAustin, Stephen F., An incredible content Autograph Letter Signed, Raising Troops for Texas, "Stephen F. Austin," 3 full pages, 4to, Nashville, TN, February 25, 1836. With integral postmarked address leaf. Less than a year before his death, he is back home in Tennessee attempting to raise troops to wrest Texas from Mexican hands. He writes Gen. John McCalla in Lexington, Kentucky:"I have been detained here by an attack of pleurisy, but have recov'd & shall leave tomorrow. I shall pass through Lexington, but cannot sop more than one or two days. I know not what your inclinations may be towards a removal to Texas. That you are at heart an enthusiast in favor of our cause I have no doubt. Your known character for patriotism and devotion to liberty requires it. But I wish TO SEE YOU THERE, sword in hand...A more glorious field never presented itself. That country is in fact superior to any part of the US in point of climate & soil, and local advantages. Choice lands can be had there now at from one dollar to five dollars an acre, near the coast. Above that, the land is as good and better watered, and may be had at from 25 cents to one dollar. The bounty for volunteers is 640 acres.""We need a Brig'r. Genl. Raise a brigade of Kentuckyans and go & glory & fame & fortu(ne) call you. I have for fifteen years been a dray horse laboring to take materials there for a solid and permanent foundation AMERICAN AND ANGLO-SAXON MATERIALS a foundation well laid of these materials I know would sustain the great temple of Liberty which I always expected to see reared in Texas. The foundation I wished for IS LAID...Nothing now remains but to elevate the Temple of Liberty upon it. Come to the raising' & come & help us to build up this glorious temple. Bring 2000 Kentuckians with you. Form a New Kentucky of your own. Col. T.D. Owings has engaged to raise one or two regiments. You & him can unite. The truth is we shall have very little fight, perhaps none. Mexico is too weak and distracted. You knew our friend the noble brave (Benjamin R.) Milam & he was an honor to Kentucky. He intended to have gone to his native state and raise a regiment. His glorious patriotic spirit calls upon his countrymen. Bold spirits and philanthropic hearts enough will be found we go to Texas to 'DO OR DIE' In that number I wish to see you & chivalrous Kentucky take a part. Tennessee has so far taken the lead & this is in motion, almost in MASSE." With Nashville postmark and rate in blue ink on cover. Seal hole in last two pages, not affecting text, separated at hinge, wear to edges and folds, with transparent paper strengthening, a strong, legible letter; very fine.Austin, Stephen F. - Texas colonist (1793-1836); known as the "father of Texas" for leading 300 families to settle in what was then a northern region of Mexico; he became an ardent supporter of the independent Texan cause once war began, and was named the first Secretary of State of the Mexican Republic; however, he did not live to serve very long, dying of pneumonia in December 1836. Benjamin Milam had led the Texan assault that captured San Antonio de Bexar from Mexico in December 1835. However, in one of the early stages of the two-month campaign, he was shot in the head and killed. The Texans took over the Alamo mission, where they would be slaughtered by Santa Anna in a battle that had already begun by the time this letter was written. Included in this lot is the Book: Life of Stephen F. Austin. Eugene C. Barker. Nashville, Cokesbury Press, 1925. 8vo, maroon cloth with gilt illustration, spine. No jacket. Apparently the trade edition. Toning, foxing, exterior wear. (imagea) (Image) Est. $15,000-20,000

SOLD for $180,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
331   [The Alamo] Exceptional Autograph Letter Signed J. Morgan in body, bursting with content, 4 pages, legal folio, New Washington (now Morgans Point), Texas, April 2, 1836, giving
an account of the events at the Battle of the Alamo less than a mo[The Alamo] Exceptional Autograph Letter Signed "J. Morgan" in body, bursting with content, 4 pages, legal folio, New Washington (now Morgan's Point), Texas, April 2, 1836, giving an account of the events at the Battle of the Alamo less than a month earlier. The author, Col. James Morgan, writes to an unnamed doctor, probably in New York, that in late February, Mexican General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna and:"some 4 or 5 hundred men visited the Alamo - a kind of fortification at Bexar containing within a wall some 7 or 8 feet high 4 or 5 acres of ground & requiring at least 500 men to defend it. Travis, with only 150 effective men, sustained the siege for 2 or 3 weeks under a constant Bombardment & was, finally, when worn down by fatigue taken, rather by surprise, on the Morning of Sunday 6th March...(defenders)...fought like Tigers to the last, dealing death & distruction in every direction until ALL was finally kil'd. I have the particulars from the only MALE survivor a black serv't. of Travis, who fought by his master's side until he fell.""Bowie, poor fellow was in bed sick. He got under the Bed when the Mexicans got in the house & fought with his pistols & knife to the last, dispatching many of the yellow skins before they dispatched him. Poor Davy Crocket 'went ahead' among them in great style. It is said he kept a lane clean before him for a long time. No man couíd have behav'd with more bravely than he did. He is known to have kil'd 25 Mexicans previous to the storm!" Though many have fled, "there are many stout hearts left who are determined to die in the last ditch, rather than surrender the Country. We want means & munitions of war & men, heavy ordinance, musket, & bayonet, powder, provisions, Bombshells, Howitzers, &c., &c. If a small vessel could be chartered & sent to me at Galveston Island…"With further content about the Texan shadow government and requests for the doctor to send musicians and mechanics. Part of the letter's last line has been clipped, possibly with Morgan's signature. Discoloration at head and foot of last page, edge wear including chipping at one lower corner of each page, affecting text on last two pages, otherwise Fine, with the most interesting content clean and legible. Col. Travis's slave, Joe, fought by his side during the early parts of the battle. However, after Travis was killed, he hid in the Alamo's chapel. Mexican soldiers assumed that because he was a slave, he had been a non-combatant. (Image) Est. $3,000-4,000

SOLD for $27,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
332   Starr, James Harper, Autograph Letter Signed by the future Texas secretary of the treasury and Confederate postal agent. Writing from Pleasant Grove, GA on March 12, 1836, he
addresses his brother, Col. Franklin Starr at Washington  Austins CoStarr, James Harper, Autograph Letter Signed by the future Texas secretary of the treasury and Confederate postal agent. Writing from Pleasant Grove, GA on March 12, 1836, he addresses his brother, Col. Franklin Starr at "Washington / Austin's Colony / Texas / via Fort Jessup La" and the letter is sent free with Starr's frank as postmaster. Forwarded by William Bryan with his handstamp. Starr is readying to leave for Texas and asks for information about the proper route. He adds in a postscript that "We have noticed in the papers some of the late proceedings of the Mexican Government. Some are much frightened & think Texas will be crushed in the conflict and the rebels treated as 'pirates'. I guess not." Letter has several splits, some repaired with paper, but all are clean breaks and the letter is otherwise fine. The Starr brothers would play important roles in the early Texas Republic. Franklin would die a year after receiving this letter, while leading an expedition against Native Americans. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $5,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
333   [Texas is Free, San Jacinto] A series of four letters by William W. Gant, a veteran of the Battle of San Jacinto, where Texas won its independence from Mexico. It begins with a
historic letter from the Battle ground of Independence, near mouth o[Texas is Free, San Jacinto] A series of four letters by William W. Gant, a veteran of the Battle of San Jacinto, where Texas won its independence from Mexico. It begins with a historic letter from the "Battle ground of Independence, near mouth of the San Jacinta. Galveston Bay April 26th" (1836). He writes his brother John Gant in Columbia, Tennessee: "My anticipation in regard to State of Col. (James) Fannin and the volunteer Army have been confirmed. He with about 500 troops was attacked by about 2500 of the enemy. Faught bravely for three hours. Killed a great many with the loss of only 8 or 9 men. Night came on, the battle ceased. The next mo(rning) the Enemy proposed to capitulate. Fann finding himself surrounded, surrendered on condition that his whole army should within eight days be sent to New Orleans. But the arch fiend Santa Anna after they were disarmed ordered them to be butchered.""We have gained a Victory whic(h) when the resources of the contending parties and the consequences to each are considered is unparalleled in the records of history. Texas is free. We with drew from the enemy until we reached the Brasos. There we made a stand. Santa Anna with a division of seven hundred advanced to this place. We pursued him with between seven and eight hundred men. We reached there on the 20th inst. and took a position about a mile to the north. They in a short time commenced a firing upon us with their cannon. Wounding (th)ree or four slightly. We made a brisk march across the prairie about 5 O'clock PM and in about fifteen minutes the enemy were routed. We had (on)ly seven killed and a few slightly wounded among (the wou)nded were Genl. Houston, Col. Neill, and J.S. Edgar. Santa Anna with his invincible Genls Cos & Almonte, were there, and are now in our power and our Prisoners. Genl. Alamonte was taken on the field. Genl. Santa Anna and Cos attempted to make their escape, but were pursued and overtaken. We now dictate to the Dictator of Mexico. He acknowledges (the independence) of Texas and has sent orders to all officials to withdraw beyond the Rio Grand." Address panel with Memphis postmark, nibbled text affects six places with loss to the text (including part of signature), as indicated by most of the bracketed sections above (excepting identifications). Partial fold separations repaired with Japanese paper. With a great letter from Columbia, Texas, October 30-Nov. 6, 1836 (apparently carried to Nashville privately and sent from there, for it has a green Nashville postmark and is rated 10 cents), informing his brother that:"The First Congress of the Republic met at this place on the 3rd". Gant was elected to the congress and adds details of the early bills before the legislature. He is sure "we will not again be invaded by the Mexicans. Santa Anna and the other Prisoners are yet in custody." He also tells his brother about Sam Houston's election as the first president of the republic. Directed on cover to go "via New Orleans." Some foxing, fold wear including partial separation at one fold.With two other letters, June 4 from Houston (with a blue New Orleans postmark, June 29) and July 6 from Washington, Texas (with a black Fort Jesup, LA postmark, August 2), both 1837. To his brother in Columbia, TN. June letter with animal visitation causing some pieces out, affecting text; July letter with some partial fold splits and paper repairs. (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $28,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
334   [After the Alamo, Houstons fitness to command] Interesting letter by Lieut. George H Crossman of the 6th Infantry, who writes from Natchitoches, Louisiana to US Representative
George W. Jones, April 5, 1836, questioning Sam Houstons fitness to[After the Alamo, Houston's fitness to command] Interesting letter by Lieut. George H Crossman of the 6th Infantry, who writes from Natchitoches, Louisiana to US Representative George W. Jones, April 5, 1836, questioning Sam Houston's fitness to command. Integral address leaf postmarked Natchitoches, April 7, and with "Free" handstamp. Crossman looks for help getting a promotion and is due to see action against the Native Americans in Florida under Gen. Edmund Gaines. He reports that:"The massacre of the garrison of San Antonio in Texas, amongst whom was David Crockett, by the troops of St. Anna, is unfortunately confirmed. The Mexicans have succeeded in defeating some small parties of the Texans, but as yet nothing decisive or very important has occurred. Houston, with his small army, has retreated back upon the timbered lands of the Colorado (i.e., Red River); where he has fortified. Various opinions are entertained of his fitness for command; what a field for (Col. Henry) Dodge, and such kind of man!"Fold wear with minor splitting. Despite others' misgivings, Sam Houston defeated and captured Gen. Santa Anna at San Jacinto just sixteen days after this letter was written. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $5,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
335   [San Jacinto] Brief soldiers letter written by Allen Lavison from Headquarters Brassos opisite Groses, (Groses plantation on the Brazos River), April 6-9, 1836. To his wife
Savanah in New Orleans, he writes:Having in my last letter request[San Jacinto] Brief soldier's letter written by Allen Lavison from "Headquarters Brassos opisite Groses," (Grose's plantation on the Brazos River), April 6-9, 1836. To his wife Savanah in New Orleans, he writes:"Having in my last letter requested you to leve a country I am obliged to fight for, I would now give allmost the world if I had it could I see you once more or know whare you are gone. If I should out live the war I will see you as soon .. if you should never see me it will be because I am dead and if so do not fail to contend for my lands in Texas which will be a fortune to you some day for Texas will be free..."He adds on the 9th: "The inimy is at San Felipe with some over our numbers. There is battle contemplated soon. We trust god and our valour for victory, send your letter to the headquarters of the Texian Army." With a second letter, this one by JH Hood in Huntsville, AL, May 13, 1836, who erroneously reports that Santa Anna has been executed by Houston's forces. With "Huntsville / ALa. postmark.With just over 900 men, Sam Houston was faced with Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna's force of nearly 1400. Instead of waiting for Santa Anna to organize his forces, Houston went on the offensive. Santa Anna was personally captured in the attack. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $2,800.00
Will close during Public Auction
336 c   Sam Ricker Jr., Agent of the Texian Post Office, New Orleans, La. (1838), mostly bold oval handstamp on folded letter with integral address leaf to Houston, Texas, originated
with two strikes of red Hartford, Ct.Jan 5 datestamp and two strikesSam Ricker Jr., Agent of the Texian Post Office, New Orleans, La. (1838), mostly bold oval handstamp on folded letter with integral address leaf to Houston, Texas, originated with two strikes of red "Hartford, Ct./Jan 5" datestamp and two strikes of matching "Paid" handstamp, carried by eastern express between New York and New Orleans with manuscript "75" for the over 400 miles rate, arrived in Galveston with their manuscript "Galveston/Jany 27/38" postmark and "31 1/4" rate for forwarding to Houston, very fine.The Eastern Express Mail was a special service of the Post Office Department, often called the Eastern Pony Express, between New York and New Orleans and was performed by post riders on horseback. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $6,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
337 c   Galveston Texas, March 8th 1839, bold manuscript postmark on folded letter with integral address leaf to the Postmaster at Newark, N.J. and endorsed Free, carried to New
Orleans by the steam packet New York with their well struck straightliGalveston Texas, March 8th 1839, bold manuscript postmark on folded letter with integral address leaf to the Postmaster at Newark, N.J. and endorsed "Free," carried to New Orleans by the steam packet New York with their well struck straightline "S P. NEW YORK" handstamp, red "New Orleans, La./Mar 28" datestamp and matching "SHIP" handstamp, fresh and very fine.The S.P. New York was a sidewheeler of 365 tons built at Brooklyn, N. Y. in 1837 for the Southern Steam Packet Co. In 1838 the company was dissolved and Charles Morgan, one of the partners, bought the New York and the Columbia and transferred them to the New Orleans to Galveston trade. The New York left Galveston on her first run on February 3, 1839. This cover must have been carried on her second trip. On September 5, 1846 the New York ran into a hurricane about fifty miles off of Galveston and foundered with the loss of 17 lives. (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $8,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
338   [Slavery in Texas] Extremely rare slavery content letter from Durant H. Davis, a slave trader, to Dr. Ashbel Smith, secretary of state of the Republic of Texas, November 26,
1839. He writes from Greensboro, Alabama, through New Orleans (where it[Slavery in Texas] Extremely rare slavery content letter from Durant H. Davis, a slave trader, to Dr. Ashbel Smith, secretary of state of the Republic of Texas, November 26, 1839. He writes from Greensboro, Alabama, through New Orleans (where it is forwarded by postal agent William Bryan) to Dr. Smith in Houston. Davis will be in Texas by Christmas and has bought a group of slaves, but will sell them in New Orleans if the doctor thinks they will not earn top prices in Texas. Smith should sell two slaves he has belonging to Davis."and I shall be perfectly satisfied. I would feel no hesitation in assuring any man that purchased them that he might consider himself a Slave holder for life unless he out lived them. If you see Johnson- know of him if he still wishes me to bring him that Tip top likely Yellow Girl that he told me to be sure and bring for him. I have four as likely as any in this Country. Inform me of it or any one else that wants two or three real fancy articles of the kind. I could supply any one. I have two that is much likelier in every respect than Mary, and two others that are very little inferior in regard appearances. I have turned Mary out to Grass. I have given her to herself (i.e., manumitted her) but I wish you to understand particularly that if I bring any of my Girls over with me, they are for sale, and neither of them are a Mary. I am done with my old tricks and shall class myself henceforward as strictly a Moral Man."Light fold wear including minor breaks. Slavery became a point of contention between Texas and Mexico, which had banned slavery in 1829; when the Mexican government announced it would begin enforcing the law north of the Rio Grande, it helped fuel the Texan independence movement. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
339   [Annexation of Texas] Choice content letter by Lieut. Israel B. Richardson from Ft. Jesup, Louisiana, to his father in Vermont, July 2, 1845:We are getting ready for a March -
orders have...arrived for the troops to enter Texas, as soon as the[Annexation of Texas] Choice content letter by Lieut. Israel B. Richardson from Ft. Jesup, Louisiana, to his father in Vermont, July 2, 1845:"We are getting ready for a March - orders have...arrived for the troops to enter Texas, as soon as the results of the Texan convention is known, which meets on the fourth...Their Congress has already decided unanimously that annexation shall pass...General Taylor's instructions are…to proceed…In three weeks at most, we shall be upon the Rio del Norte. Capt. Stockton's fleet mounting 160 guns in all, is also awaiting orders at Galveston..."In exceptional condition. As expected, the Texas congress approved annexation. General Taylor landed near Corpus Christi on July 25. In December, the United States approved the annexation, and the following March, Taylor moved south of the Nueces, provoking the war that would win all of Texas, California, and the southwest for the United States. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $1,600.00
Will close during Public Auction
340   [Ben McCulloch, Texas Ranger] Rare early document signed twice by Texas Ranger Ben McCulloch. Scarce date Manuscript Document Signed Ben McCulloch  Capt. Texas Rangers twice, 1
page, 4to, Ft. Brown, (Texas), June 16, 1846. McCulloch endorses a[Ben McCulloch, Texas Ranger] Rare early document signed twice by Texas Ranger Ben McCulloch. Scarce date Manuscript Document Signed "Ben McCulloch / Capt. Texas Rangers" twice, 1 page, 4to, Ft. Brown, (Texas), June 16, 1846. McCulloch endorses a forage return for twenty horses and three mules, for five days' expected service. His second signature at the bottom of the page endorses a correction to the list given above in a hand-made table. McCulloch, Ben - American soldier and scout (1811-62); born in Tennessee, he went to Texas with David Crockett in 1835; joined the Texas Rangers in 1838; led a company of rangers in the Mexican War; upon the secession of Texas, became a colonel in the Confederate Army, taking possession of federal property in the state; victorious in the Battle of Wilson's Creek; killed at the Battle of Pea Ridge. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,700.00
Will close during Public Auction

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