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EXPLORATION AND WAR continued...

THE INDIAN WARS continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
281   [Indian Troubles] Eight letters, mostly from US soldiers, about the ongoing struggles with Native Americans during the westward expansion, 1830-58. Henry Gratiot from Gratiot's Grove, Michigan Territory (now Wisconsin), 1830: "The Rock River Indians...tel me that the government intends to push them on the west shores of the Mississippi amongst the Sous & Fox tribes...They have runners from Chicagon an also from the Portage that give them very regularly such news." Ft. Gibson, 1837: "I allude to an engagement between some of the still hostile Creek Indians, and a party of Volunteers commanded by my brother George (Hawkins) who...received three severe wounds...but is recovering fast." Far West, Wisconsin Territory, 1837: "There is a war in full blast between the Saukes and foxes of the one part and the Sious on the other." Ft. Clark, TX, 1857: "About fifteen days ago a party of Indians came into the Settlements below here and stole some horses. Lieut. Hazen of the 8th Infty. went in pursuit of them and surprised a party of Indians on the Nueces River and killed four." Camp Semiahmoo, (Washington), 1858: "The Indian difficulties are all quietted out here...but in about eighteen months there will be trouble with us when we get through the Coast Range...Col [George] Wright killed eight hundred horses...belonging to the Indians...They will steal them back one by one from the whites." As these brief quotes indicate, the content is exceptional. Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
282   Taliaferro, Lawrence, Trio of content autograph letters signed from the Indian Agency at St. Peters, the first July 6, 1831. He writes to Genl. Joseph M. Street in Prairie du
Chien, I have recently concluded a peace between four bands of the CTaliaferro, Lawrence, Trio of content autograph letters signed from the Indian Agency at St. Peters, the first July 6, 1831. He writes to Genl. Joseph M. Street in Prairie du Chien, "I have recently concluded a peace between four bands of the Chippeways and five bands of the Sioux...the warriors of the Sioux opening the negotiation of their own free will...Both tribes departed for their lines on Sauk River and east and west of the Mississippi...There will arise some difficulty in the payment of Annuities to the lower Sioux...The Wahpacoota Sioux object to Wabishas receiving one cent of the Money...These people say that any man white or Red who will be such a fool as to say that the lower Sioux have a claim to the forks of Red Cedar is a liar This they state in plain terms...None of the lower Sioux ever pitched a lodge in that country until Mr. Rolette established a trading house at the forks...Our particular pets & very much indulged friends the Sacs & Foxes want to be paid over agian for the Illinois purchase." With much more excellent content. See the related letter by John C Calhoun on selling liquor to the Natives. In the next two letters, 1838 and 1839, he writes GW Jones, in part about his shoddy treatment by the War Department. Worth deteailed examination. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $4,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
283 c   [Indian Creek Massacre] The order to ransom the Hall Sisters. Historic Autograph Letter Signed by General Henry Atkinson, Dixon's Ferry, Illinois, to Indian Agent Henry Gratiot at "Gratiot's Grove," May 27, 1832. He pens, "In the attack of the Sac Indians on the settlements, on a branch of Fox river, the 22nd. inst. fifteen men women and children were killed and two young women (Rachel and Sylvia Hall) were taken prisoners. This heart rending occurrence should not only call forth our sympathies, but urge us to relieve the survivors. You will therefore proceed to the Turtle (Indian) village, or send someone and prevail upon the head chief and braves of the Winnebagos there to go over to the hostile Sacs and endeavor to ransom the prisoners. Offer the Winnebagos a large reward...$500 or 1000 for each." Address leaf with Atkinson's "public service" frank. With the Book: Indian Creek Massacre and Captivity of Hall Girls. Charles M. Scanlan. Milwaukee, Reic Publishing, 1915. Second edition. 12mo, blue cloth. Risvold label on pastedown. Light cover wear.Gratiot went into action quickly. With the help of the Winnebagos, he was able to ransom the sisters for just ten horses. By that time they were in the possession of Black Hawk himself, three of whose warriors were involved in the initial raid on May 21 or 22, killing fifteen settlers at Indian Creek. According to all accounts, the sisters were treated well by Black Hawk, who boasted that they would have been killed had they not been sent to his camp. Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $1,450.00
Will close during Public Auction
284   [Black Hawk War, early Chicago postmark] brown manuscript Chicago Ill, 29 May postmark and matching 18 34 rate on 1832 folded letter with integral address leaf to Brownsville,
Illinois with an eye-witness account of the Indian Creek massacre[Black Hawk War, early Chicago postmark] brown manuscript "Chicago Ill, 29 May" postmark and matching "18 3/4" rate on 1832 folded letter with integral address leaf to Brownsville, Illinois with an eye-witness account of the Indian Creek massacre, very fine; believed to be the second earliest postmark of Chicago in private hands.The letter is written by Richard J. Hamilton who was with the party sent to the relief of the settlers in the Fox River Valley. The following is his eye witness account of what they found on Indian Creek: "At the house of a Wm. Davis on Indian Creek on the morning of the 22nd....we witnessed one of the most shocking sights that could possibly be presented to the human senses. There were three families assembled at Davis' house for security, consisting of seventeen persons men, women and children, fifteen of whom we found laying in the house and around it, all shot, speared, tomahawked and scalped with the exception of an infant and woman who were not scalped but were much mangled, and the cruelty perpetrated upon the bodies of the slain was enough to have shocked the senses of even a savage. Two were missing supposed to be prisoners both young girls. The massacre was committed on the evening of the 21st....We buried the dead in the best possible manner....this country is completely desolate the houses and farms abandoned and most of the houses broken open...and some of them burned."The two girls mentioned above were the Hall sisters and they were eventually recovered from their Indian captivity. (imagea) (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $3,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
285   [Black Hawk War] Two letters from men involved in the war against the Sauk and Fox under Black Hawk. The first, June 10, 1832, is from Lt. George H. Croman at Jefferson
Barracks, MO, (with his Frank), to W.A. Gordon of the Quartermaster Generals[Black Hawk War] Two letters from men involved in the war against the Sauk and Fox under Black Hawk. The first, June 10, 1832, is from Lt. George H. Croman at Jefferson Barracks, MO, (with his Frank), to W.A. Gordon of the Quartermaster General's Office in Washington. "The blow has been struck and the whole frontier is in a blaze of excitement and alarm...the Gov. of Ill. has called out 3,000 men who are to meet this day at Hennepin...and there to be...placed under the comand of Genl. Atkinson...and about 1,000 Menominies and Sioux were daily expected at Galena to cooperate." He goes on to describe the fortifications at Galena, Iillinois, and to express his wish to join the troops in the field.With a letter by Peter Menard, June 22, 1832, from the "Foot of the Ills. Rapids" to his father, pioneering fur trader Pierre Menard, at Kaskaskia, IL. With a cover carried by "Steam Boat" to St. Louis, where it entered the mails June 26. He arrived three days earlier and has "just rec'd intelligence that Genl. Dodge & Co. killed eleven Indians. Whiteside & Co. kild four. James Stevanson had a skermish with the Indians - lost three men and himself badly wounded if not mortally...Snider (Adam W. Snyder) had a skermish, and lost three men...We shall not find the Indians in large body, and the only way left to expel the Inds. is to devide the army in small band - from 100 to 200 men...I believe the campain will close in four weeks." Young Menard was not far off; the war would end with the Battle of Bad Axe just over five weeks later. (imagea) (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $3,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
286   [The Black Hawk War, Winfield Scott] Important Autograph Letter Signed twice, Winfield Scott, and (after postscript) W.S., 3 ½ pages, 4to, Chicago, July 18, 1832. To Brigadier
General Henry Atkinson, commanding all US forces, he reports, S[The Black Hawk War, Winfield Scott] Important Autograph Letter Signed twice, "Winfield Scott," and (after postscript) "W.S.," 3 ½ pages, 4to, Chicago, July 18, 1832. To Brigadier General Henry Atkinson, commanding all US forces, he reports, "Since I wrote to you on the 12th all my intelligence from Detroit has been disastrous. The detachments of Lieut. Colonels Cummings & Twiggs, & that of Major Payne, have suffered dreadfully from cholera & were, on the 13th encamped. The second & third near Fort Gratiot (present-day Port Huron, Michigan) & the first below Detroit. .. I learn, also, that death & panic have stopped the navigation above Detroit .... the schooner Napoleon, which lies in the river below Huron, without master or crew."Just three days after this letter was sent the militia under his command routed Black Hawk and his warriors at near present-day Sauk City. They pursued the fleeing Sauk and Fox Indians, and caught up with them at the Mississippi River on August 1. There they virtually annihilated them, and captured Black Hawk, ending the war.Last page quite soiled, with foxing of all pages, some fold and edge wear, but fully legible and extremely desirable.Scott, Winfield - American soldier (1786-1866) served in the War of 1812, the Black Hawk War, the Mexican War, and the Civil War. The cholera epidemic greatly reduced the number of active American soldiers. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $1,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
287   [Black Hawk War, Battle of Bad Axe] Excellent battle content autograph letter signed by Lt. Edgar M. Lacy from Fort Winnebago, August 9, 1832, to John Lacy at Fort Niagara:Our
Indian War is about over. Yesterday evening a gentleman arrived wit[Black Hawk War, Battle of Bad Axe] Excellent battle content autograph letter signed by Lt. Edgar M. Lacy from Fort Winnebago, August 9, 1832, to John Lacy at Fort Niagara:"Our Indian War is about over. Yesterday evening a gentleman arrived with information that Gen. [William] Atkinson had overtaken Black Hawk and his part on the Mississippi river about 36 miles above the mouth of the Ouisconsin. The Indians were about to cross. The Army consisting of about eighteen hundred...drove them to the Mississippi where they made a stand...In a few minutes all save twenty were scalped. They were met on the river by a steamboat loaded with provisions. Fortunately there was a six-pounder on board loaded with grape, and the first shot killed 23. Twenty made their escape - B. Hawk & his son among them." With August 20 Mackinac postmark and 27 rate. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $850.00
Will close during Public Auction
288 c   [Cholera during the Black Hawk War], manuscript Sault Ste. Marie, Aug 7 postmark and matching 25 rate on 1832 folded letter with integral address leaf to Hadley, Mass., fresh
and very fine ex-Haas.The military letter reads ...They (s[Cholera during the Black Hawk War], manuscript "Sault Ste. Marie, Aug 7" postmark and matching "25" rate on 1832 folded letter with integral address leaf to Hadley, Mass., fresh and very fine; ex-Haas.The military letter reads; "...They (soldiers) were detained near a fortnight at Mackinac, before a boat came to carry them to C(hicago)...a steamboat with troops had reached them bringing cholera, seven deaths had occurred in three days...The boat which brought the disease to Mc. proceeded to Chicago; but in three days threw 51 soldiers into the Lake & left the rest sick at C. Who can stand when the Lord rises up?""Sat. eve' July 1st, a steamboat came marching up before our settlement...She was looked upon as a deathship...She was ordered to stop, cast anchor in the stream, & to send no one ashore upon penalty of a salute from the guns of the forts. They yielded very reluctantly. They reported 'no cholera,' had about 200 troops, 20 officers, two or three clergymen, on board...Monday morn' Black Hawk & his forces disbursed to a swamp; probably nothing to be done but to starve him out…" The balance of the letter deals with other reports of cholera on the Lake amongst the traders, and of the conversion of the Indians. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $425.00
Will close during Public Auction
289   Taylor, Zachary, A historic group of four Letters Signed and one Document Signed, 1832-43. The first, written from Ft. Crawford, Illinois Territory, (now Prairie du Chien,
Wisconsin) August 23, 1832, is to the US Adjutant General upon Taylors beTaylor, Zachary, A historic group of four Letters Signed and one Document Signed, 1832-43. The first, written from Ft. Crawford, Illinois Territory, (now Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin) August 23, 1832, is to the US Adjutant General upon Taylor's being named commander of the First Regiment of US Infantry. Taylor, soon after forcing and personally accepting the surrender of Native American leader Black Hawk, makes requests in light of his regiment's constant, "fatigue (non military labor) for the last three years, except while on the late Campaign against the Indians while a portion of the same Regiment, stationed in its vicinity has had no fatigues comparatively to perform…Three of the Companies from this fort even in the duties of the soldier, were detached on a Campaign."Taylor seeks the authority to rotate troops to even the load and keep men fresh for different kinds of duty. One of the most frustrating problems he faces is the misuse of soldiers, which has led to desertions, and he requests a regulation "prohibiting officers who receive compensation for waiters or servants, from employing soldiers in that way and that all houses built ..(etc.) .. be the property of the government."A letter from November 24 of the next year complains about the quality of new recruits; he cannot fill out a company of grenadiers, for there are "only 10 of the number 5 feet, 9 inches high & above (the prescribed heighth for Grenadiers) out of which number one has been rejected and one deserted before they arrived." With DS "Z. Taylor. Col. / US Army / & actg. US In. Agent," on November 21, 1836, requisitions Lt. George Wilson, a quartermaster and military disbursing agent for the Indian department, for "$9 to pay …. for the use of the Indian agency at Prairie du Chien"Two years later, now involved in the Second Seminole War and a brevet brigadier general, Taylor writes from Fort Frank Brooke, Dead Man's Bay, Florida (present site of Steinhatchee, in Taylor County) on December 21, 1838, to Adjutant General R. Jones, that he has crossed northern Florida, looking for the enemy without discovering any. However, he learned that:"the Indians had stopped a Train of Four waggons belonging to Citizens near Wacassassa and robbed the drivers (Negroes) of their clothing and Wagon covers, departed, without committing any other acts of outrage. I determined to proceed to this place with the Infantry and Dragoons and have the country between the Suwannee and Tallahassee completely scoured and the Enemy driven out from it" and sent out reconnoitering parties, "it is hoped that the Enemy will be driven from Middle Florida and entire security given to the Inhabitants."However, Taylor soon makes it clear that he doubts reports of attacks by the Seminoles. He has heard that some buildings in present-day Clay County "were burnt by the hostiles (where there were from three to four hundred troops) who also fired on the house…(a boy) having discharged a Gun at them, the Indians, if Indians they were, ran off…from reports appears to have been committed by a few Indians and one Negro." Although to protect settlers "troops have been posted .. where the hostiles weresupposed to be.." small and large groups have been dispatched for months in every direction "without coming in colission (sic) with a single Indian while I am constantly informed of murders committed on our Citizens, houses burning…in sections where they are ten times more numerous than the Enemy who they say committed them."Saving Fort Washita: The final letter, written from Fort Smith, Arkansas, April 12, 1843, is to the adjutant general, enclosing "a communication (present) received a day or two since from Captain Armstrong, Choctaw Agent and acting Superintendent, in relation to the importance of a post on the Fort Washita" with his strongest endorsement. The letter says that the fort is necessary to protect the the Coctaws and Chickasaws from depredations by the Shawnees, Delawares, Kickapoos, and Caddoes, into whose territory the US government has moved the first two tribes. It is also necessary to protect them from the residents of Texas!On the verso of the integral leaf of Taylor's letter is a lengthy ANS by Commanding General of the Army "Winfield Scott" on May 11, to Secretary of War John Porter, explaining that "Fort Washita was originally established at the insistence of Mr. Secretary Bell." Scott had ordered Taylor to break up no other forts "unless it be that on the False Washita …" With the subscribed Endorsement Signature "Approved / Jn. Porter / War Dept. / May 11, 1843."Fort Washita was strategically placed near the confluence of the Washita and Red Rivers. Letters have the minor flawsbut is primarily Very Fine.Taylor, Zachary - Twelfth President of the United States (1784-1850, served 1849-50); earlier, a military hero of the War of 1812, the Black Hawk War, and the Mexican War, the last Whig elected president. (imagea) (imageb) (imagec) (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $9,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
290   [Johnston, George] Three items written to the US Indian sub-agent at Michilimackinac and Grand Traverse Bay, MI. The first item, from December 1832, is a letter from the Treasury Department announcing $1556.40 is due to him from his accounts. They will be sent to Governor George B. Porter "with instructions to cause the payments to be made to the individuals holding the certificates." The other two, from Sault Ste. Marie, November 1839 and February 1840, are from Johnston's son, H.W. Johnston. Est. $200-300

SOLD for $100.00
Will close during Public Auction
291   [Massacre of the Winnebagos] Important autograph letter signed by Ethan Allen Hitchcock, Fort Crawford, Michigan Territory, November 7, 1834, to Lt. Colonel William Davenport
of the 1st Infantry at Fort Armstrong at Rock Island, IL. He has heard[Massacre of the Winnebagos] Important autograph letter signed by Ethan Allen Hitchcock, Fort Crawford, Michigan Territory, November 7, 1834, to Lt. Colonel William Davenport of the 1st Infantry at Fort Armstrong at Rock Island, IL. He has heard about the:"murders of the Winnebagos...& my time was entirely taken up in hastening the party in pursuit...They killed ten - 3 or 4 women & the rest children. Lieut. Lamotte & Pegram went up to the scene of the murders & returned...The account they gave of appearances on the Island was shocking in the extreme. The Sacs lost one man however. The little boy who first brought news of the massacre said that he fired at the party before running & though he saw one fellow reel. It turned out that he shot the rascal through the heart. I have seen the boy today (about 12 years old) & he is decked out with the usual badges of a 'brave'...I say Sac but I understand he was a Fox - known, I believe by the manner of trimming the hair. The Winnebagos were paid their Ann'ity last week & were making preparations to go west & join the Sioux...But this Massacre has changed their plan...They are flocking in from every quarter...Shamefully alarmed. Rolette says this will cost 'the Company' (American Fur Co.) $5000, for that the hunts are broke up." He sends several detachments through the area to try tracking down the culprits. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $900.00
Will close during Public Auction
292   Hitchcock, Ethan Allen, Interesting frontier content Autograph Letter Signed E.A. Hitchcock, 3 12 pages, 4to, Fort Crawford, Michigan Territory (now Prairie du Chien,
Wisconsin), January 15, 1835. He writes his friend, Capt. Richard Bache, inHitchcock, Ethan Allen, Interesting frontier content Autograph Letter Signed "E.A. Hitchcock," 3 1/2 pages, 4to, Fort Crawford, Michigan Territory (now Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin), January 15, 1835. He writes his friend, Capt. Richard Bache, in Washington, primarily about the dangers and pleasures of solitude. He writes that: "… those restless Fox Indns have within a few months killed two parties, one of Menomonee's & one of Winnebago's, but the Fox chiefs declare that these acts have been performed by headstrong young men, who will not be controled & they have given proof of a disposition to preserve peace by delivering the young ment to the Indn Agents to be dealt with...Three of the murderers...are confined here & several are at Rock Isl. ...Col. Taylor was absent & I was in Com...I would not make a spectacle of the prisoners, but suffered to Winnebago's to see them, that they might give testimony to the Nation ..." Hitchcock, Ethan Allen - American soldier (1798-1870); known as the 'Pen of the Army' for his scholarly writings and famed book and manuscript collections; served in the Seminole Wars and the Mexican War, where he was brevetted a brigadier general; a Washington staff general in the US Civil War. With the Book: Narrative of the Captivity and Providential Escape of Mrs. Jane Lewis... Jane Lewis. No publisher information, 1833. 8vo with original illustrated paper wraps. Staining, soiling, and edge wear. Mrs. Lewis was captured by the Sac and Fox Indians under Black Hawk. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
293   [Iowa, Joseph M. Street] Partly printed document signed three times (once in body) by Street, US Indian Agent, Rock Island, IL, October 1835. He approves a payment by the
United States of $30 to the steam boat Warrior for his passage and that of<[Iowa, Joseph M. Street] Partly printed document signed three times (once in body) by Street, US Indian Agent, Rock Island, IL, October 1835. He approves a payment by the United States of $30 to the steam boat Warrior for his passage and that of "The Sac Chief Pashapahoo from Fort Desmoines to Rock Island." Pashapahoo would sign the treaty between the United States and the Sac and Foxes the following year.Despite its name, this original Fort Des Moines was located at what is now Montrose, Iowa, not Des Moines. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $325.00
Will close during Public Auction
294 c   [Second Seminole Indian War, 1836-42] folded letter with integral address leaf to Washington, D.C. datelined at Fort Brooke Tampa Bay, West Florida, 29 Dec. 1836 endorsed Free
and carried by ship to New Orleans where it entered the mails with[Second Seminole Indian War, 1836-42] folded letter with integral address leaf to Washington, D.C. datelined at "Fort Brooke Tampa Bay, West Florida, 29 Dec. 1836" endorsed "Free" and carried by ship to New Orleans where it entered the mails with blue datestamp and matching "SHIP" handstamp, docketed as having been received on 24 January, fresh and very fine.In the letter from G.H. Grossman to a member of the House of Representatives he writes: ..."The war in Florida is not yet ended and God only knows when it will be. Large forces have been marching and countermarching thro' and over the country since last December...and yet the enemy is not subdued, and, in fact with the exception of some small losses which he sustained...is as far from being whipped as ever, - Now scattering into small parties and hiding away in the distant swamps and Hammocks, before the advance of our armies; and then, suddenly, reappearing in force at unexpected points and committing all sorts of depredations, or falling upon weak places and attacking and pillaging in Indian style. We have just returned from Volusia where we had accompanied Gent. Jessup to relive Gen. Call in command of the Army; which was done on the 8th - On the way over here, we captured at an Indian Village, 41 Negros, who had been left by the retreating enemy. - we also took an Indian prisoner who with some of the negroes, have given us very important and useful information about the country...we are all in strong hopes of success." (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $1,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
295   [Report regarding Indian Prisoners] Great content autograph letter signed by John Grimsley, Washington County, Iowa Territory, March 20, 1839, to the American agent to the
Sioux, Lt. Wm. McKessack in Prairie du Chien. He sends the important news[Report regarding Indian Prisoners] Great content autograph letter signed by John Grimsley, Washington County, Iowa Territory, March 20, 1839, to the American agent to the Sioux, Lt. Wm. McKessack in Prairie du Chien. He sends the important news that: "There is at this time a female of the Sioux nation of Indians, now a prisoner in the hands of the Sox and Fox Indians, lately taken by them, according to their own accounts...Last friday she was to be put to death; but they have declined killing her. Yesterday myself and three or four others went to the camp of the chief...on Skunk River..Mac col wa. He showed us some articles that they say they took from her...He told me they would not kill her, saying she was good to rais corn. I wished to know if they would sell her. He said he would take seven good horses for her.""They say they caught another female the same time, and cut her throte. They say she cries much, which appears to be sport for them...I have not where with to purchase her. All I can do is to ac in such a manner as will not be pregudicial to her and to ascertain the least they will take for her. I hope...her nation by your assistance may redeem her from savage and unfeeling masters...I will do all in my power for the cause of humanity." (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $850.00
Will close during Public Auction
296   [Fort Snelling, Henry Sibley] Good content autograph letter signed by Sibley, River St. Peters, February 1, 1841, to Col. S.C. Stambaugh in Washington. He explains that
Jean-Baptiste Faribault would have sent in the paperwork requested:with th[Fort Snelling, Henry Sibley] Good content autograph letter signed by Sibley, River St. Peters, February 1, 1841, to Col. S.C. Stambaugh in Washington. He explains that Jean-Baptiste Faribault would have sent in the paperwork requested:"with the signatures of the Indians, ratifying their previous grant of the island (Pike's Island, which had been granted by the Dakotas to Pelagie Faribault, Jean-Baptiste's wife, in 1820) had not the principal men been absent from this place at the Red Cedar ...In regard to allowing you a farther remuneration in case of an appropriation being made for the purchase of the island...he cannot consent to allow you more than 4500...out of the $12,000 for which he has authorized the said island to be sold, and which his Attorney, Ramsey Crooks, Esq. has been authorized to pay you." In 1821, the Faribaults were thrown off the island by Col Josiah Snelling. The government never paid for the seizure. Sibley, Henry H. - American pioneer and politician (1811-91); first governor of the State of Minnesota. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $2,900.00
Will close during Public Auction
297 c   [Seminole Indian War, Florida, 1841] folded letter with integral address lead datelined at Fort Shannon, 2 March, 1841 to Colonel J.W. Worth, carried by military courier from
Fort Shannon (on the St. Johns River at Palatka) to Tampa Bay, very f[Seminole Indian War, Florida, 1841] folded letter with integral address lead datelined at "Fort Shannon, 2 March, 1841" to Colonel J.W. Worth, carried by military courier from Fort Shannon (on the St. Johns River at Palatka) to Tampa Bay, very fine.Colonel David E. Twiggs, commanding the 2nd Dragoons, writes Colonel Worth of the 8th Infantry on the possible strategy for the Seminole Indian War. He also mentions General Scott running for president - "the highest office in our country." General Worth commanded the First Division and Twiggs the Second Army of Invasion in the war with Mexico in 1847. Both were officers in the War of 1812. Twiggs joined the Confederate States army as a Major General in 1861. He died 15 July, 1862. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $700.00
Will close during Public Auction
298   [Indian Attack, 1843] Letter by Capt EV Sumner at Fort Atkinson, Iowa Territory, to Col. Wilson, April 3, 1843. He has caught three Native Americans within two days of their
horrible attack upon Wilcoxs settlement: The Indians went to the hou[Indian Attack, 1843] Letter by Capt EV Sumner at Fort Atkinson, Iowa Territory, to Col. Wilson, April 3, 1843. He has caught three Native Americans within two days of their horrible attack upon Wilcox's settlement: "The Indians went to the house on friday morning the 24th of March, and remained there through that day and the next. The house was occupied by two men...and three children...One a boy of 14 years another boy of 9 yrs and a little girl between 7 and 8, the mother was absent... The Indians first killed Atwell. Then they tied the hands of Teagarden, and threw a bottle at his head... then shot him through the head. They then killed the youngest boy, by beating out his brains, and gave the boy five dreadful wounds in the back, with a spear...The infernal villains then, all of them, ravished the little girl and afterwards wounded her as they had the boy. They then set fire to the house.""The little girl...roused her oldest brother...These children then escaped...The little girl, besides her other dreadful injuries, was very badly frozen, and will lose one of her feet...I do not think they can survive...It is said that 4 Winnebagos were murdered by whites last month, 3 men and a woman...The woman after being horribly used, after tying and beating the husband, by a number of soldiers near Fort Crawford." (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $850.00
Will close during Public Auction
299   [Indian Attacks, 1844] Two letters, the first from headquarters of the 3rd Military District, St. Louis, September 5, 1844. Captain HS Turner transmits the order to Lt. Col.
Henry Wilson at Fort Snelling, Iowa Territory, to march into the Siss[Indian Attacks, 1844] Two letters, the first from headquarters of the 3rd Military District, St. Louis, September 5, 1844. Captain HS Turner transmits the order to Lt. Col. Henry Wilson at Fort Snelling, Iowa Territory, to "march into the Sissiton Country & there demand the surrender to you of the man or men concerned in murdering the white man, north of the St. Peters...which murderer or murderers you will turn over to the nearest civil authority...Should they not be surrendered, you will take hostages from the Chiefs or Principle men of that band, whom you will conduct to Fort Snelling & detain there." The second is Wilson's account of the expedition, written October 24, where he reports that the chiefs "willingly surrendered four young men named by me who were accessories of the murder" and promised to deliver the principal culprit and another accomplice as soon as they could get their hands on them. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $700.00
Will close during Public Auction
300 c   Fort Snelling, Octo. 25 (1844), manuscript postmark while Iowa Territory and 25 rate on folded cover with integral address leaf to Green Lake, Wisconsin, fresh and very
fine.Interesting letter from a Mary S. Clark in which she reports the returFort Snelling, Octo. 25 (1844), manuscript postmark while Iowa Territory and "25" rate on folded cover with integral address leaf to Green Lake, Wisconsin, fresh and very fine.Interesting letter from a Mary S. Clark in which she reports the return of the expedition into Sisseton country under Colonel Wilson: "...The troops just returned and are well...They took 5 Indians as prisoners, who much to the mortification of the command escaped. Lt. Seldon was officer of the guard at the time of their escape and is to be summoned before a court martial this morning to give his defence." (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $800.00
Will close during Public Auction

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