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EXPLORATION AND WAR continued...

THE AMERICAN FUR TRADE continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
101   Ashley, William H., Autograph letter signed, 1831, with 8 letters written to Ashley, 1831-32. The autograph letter is from St. Louis, November 24, 1831, to merchant Elisha
Tracy in New Orleans. He requests Tracy to send him 1200 lbs of coffeeAshley, William H., Autograph letter signed, 1831, with 8 letters written to Ashley, 1831-32. The autograph letter is from St. Louis, November 24, 1831, to merchant Elisha Tracy in New Orleans. He requests Tracy to send him "1200 lbs of coffee / 2500 lbs 1st quality brown Sugar / 300 lbs Rice / 4 boxes prepared chocolate / 2 Do Raisins / 2 Do Y. Hyson Tea 14 lbs each / 1 Hogshead highest proof Rum" to arrive in St. Louis on February 15. Seven of the other letters are from Tracy's company in New York to Ashley in Washington, DC. The last, from New York on the last day of 1832, is to Ashley from Sublette & Campbell, probably in a secretarial hand, announcing that they were unable to get credit over twelve months from Wolfe, Specs & Clarke but may be able to work out a different deal. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $6,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
102   Ashley, William Free Frank, Cover franked Free  W.H. Ashley, addressed to David Murphy of Farmington, Missouri. Undoubtedly from the period 1831-36, during which Ashley was a
member of Congress and therefore had the franking privilege no postAshley, William Free Frank, Cover franked "Free / W.H. Ashley," addressed to David Murphy of Farmington, Missouri. Undoubtedly from the period 1831-36, during which Ashley was a member of Congress and therefore had the franking privilege; no postal markings; fine and rare. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $120.00
Will close during Public Auction
103   [Ashley, William H.] Six business letters to Ashley, 1832-33, from merchants Riddle, Forsythe & Co (2) of Pittsburgh, Siter, Price & Co of Philadelphia (3), and Allison &
Anderson of Louisville. Most concern the purchase or sale of furs or suppli[Ashley, William H.] Six business letters to Ashley, 1832-33, from merchants Riddle, Forsythe & Co (2) of Pittsburgh, Siter, Price & Co of Philadelphia (3), and Allison & Anderson of Louisville. Most concern the purchase or sale of furs or supplies, including Siter, Price & Co's apology that "the market should be so very bad to sell in." Two letters preserved between translucent pages. At this point, Ashley's involvement in the fur trade was primarily through investments and close advice to William Sublette and Robert Campbell, as his energies were also needed in the US Congress. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $325.00
Will close during Public Auction
104   Ashley, William H.,Pair of manuscript Documents Signed, with covers, both 1832, with the accounts of General William H. Ashley with Frederick A. Tracy of New York, and with
J.S. Allison of Louisville. He sends furs and other articles east, in somAshley, William H.,Pair of manuscript Documents Signed, with covers, both 1832, with the accounts of General William H. Ashley with Frederick A. Tracy of New York, and with J.S. Allison of Louisville. He sends furs and other articles east, in some cases in exchange for other goods for him to sell in St. Louis. Both covers are franked "free," as Ashley was a member of Congress. Allison account with lower fifth partly separated at fold; Tracy account with seal hole repaired. The Allison cover, which had to be forwarded from St. Louis to Columbia, MO, bears a "St. LOUIS / Mo. T." territorial designation postmark though Missouri had been a state for nearly a decade. (imagea) (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $325.00
Will close during Public Auction
105   [Ashleys deposition regarding Cunninghams death] Ashley, William H., Important manuscript Document Signed W.H. Ashley, given to Justice of the Peace D. Hough, St. Louis,
October 24, 1834. According to the deposition for the case of Joseph Cun[Ashley's deposition regarding Cunningham's death] Ashley, William H., Important manuscript Document Signed "W.H. Ashley," given to Justice of the Peace D. Hough, St. Louis, October 24, 1834. According to the deposition for the case of Joseph Cunningham (for David Cunningham's estate) v. William L. Sublette, Ashley says that:"Jedediah S. Smith, David E. Jackson and William L. Sublette composed the firm of Smith Jackson & Sublette...commenced in July or August 1826...Deponent attended to the business of the firm here, such as receiving the furs and paying over the money...Deponent does not positively know that David Cunningham was in the employ of said firm, but is under the impression that...he had been so employed. That he went with Mr. Smith to California, or in that direction and that he was engaged in that expedition when he was killed. That he was employed as a hired man. In Oct. 1830 at St. Louis there was a settlement between Joseph Cunningham...and the firm. Deponent thinks both Smith & Sublette were present...when deponent paid the money to the administrator or furnished the money for that purpose." Fold wear, with one folded panel nearly cleanly detached. For details of David Cunningham's death, see the Thomas Fitzpatrick deposition, given when the matter first went before the court in 1830 (lot #134). Clearly Joseph Cunningham was awarded a settlement and four years later was complaining that he had not been paid sufficiently, or perhaps at all.Ashley, William H. - American fur trader and politician (1778-1838); a general of militia in the War of 1812; created the Rocky Mountain Fur Company in 1822, calling for "enterprising young men" to go trapping along the Missouri River; these men became the "Ashley Hundred," and comprised the first generation of the great mountain men, including Jedediah Smith, William Sublette, Thomas Fitzpatrick, Jim Bridger, Jim Beckwourth, and David Jackson; sold out to Sublette, Jackson, and Smith in 1826. (Image) Est. $3,000-4,000

SOLD for $5,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
106   [Astor and The American Fur Trade Company, 1812] Astor, John Jacob, Fur trade content manuscript Letter Signed John Jacob Astor, 2 pages, 4to, New York, March 26, 1812. He
writes to US Congressman Samuel Mitchill of New York in Washington:Yo[Astor and The American Fur Trade Company, 1812] Astor, John Jacob, Fur trade content manuscript Letter Signed "John Jacob Astor," 2 pages, 4to, New York, March 26, 1812. He writes to US Congressman Samuel Mitchill of New York in Washington:"You are pretty well acquainted with the extensive plan which has been formed here by the American Fur Company of which I am the principal...carrying on the Indian trade. That trade as you know has been long in the hands of the British and conducted by an association of Canada Merchants; one under the firm of the North West Company and another of the Michilimackinac Company, who had acquired such power...that individuals could not enter into competition with them; on acct. of which a Company was form'd here with a large Capital.""The trade with Indians...cannot be carried on by opposition without ruin to one or other of the parties...It became the policy of the American Fur Company to attack them on the weakest point, which was conceived to be from the Western Shore of this Continent, and which purpose 3 ships have been sent to the Columbia River, viz. the Enterprize in 1809, the Tonquin in 1810 & the Beaver in 1811, besides which a party of 80 men under the direction of Mr. (Wilson P.) Hunt of Trenton have been sent up the Missouri to penetrate across the Country, with a view to make Columbia River and form a junction with those...""A quantity of Goods was in the meantime ordered from England...Information was given to the people in Canada, that if they would relinquish that part of the Indian trade which is within the boundaries of the United States to the American Fur Company - we would in lieu thereof engage not to oppose them in that trade with Indians in the boundaries of Great Britain - two which they reply'd, pay us for the stock of Goods & the Establishments which we have in the Country and we will sell to you...After long negociations an arrangement took place...All the rest are to be surrendered this year...In the meantime the Presidents Proclamation prevented the Goods ordered...from being Shipp'd to New York as was first intended. They were shipp'd to Canada & from thence transported up Country...They were stored on the Island of St. Joseph, between Lake Huron & Lake Superior." As a result he cannot do business although he must still pay his employees. He now looks to the federal government for relief. With Mitchill's docket and his note in favor of seeking to help Astor.There would soon be no question of Astor retrieving his supplies, even if he was able to get some compensation. Within three months, the United States would officially be at war with Great Britain. Astor's overland party had just reached Fort Astoria, the settlement he writes of, in February 1812. A year later, Astor sold the fort to the British-owned North West Company. As it was in territory claimed by both the United States and Great Britain, it fell outside the scope of his offer to keep out of each other's borders. Perhaps due to Rep. Mitchill's efforts, the fort was restored to Astor (though it had been sold, not captured) in the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War of 1812. The reversion to American ownership was merely ceremonial, and the fort would remain in British hands until the land it was on officially became part of the United States in 1846.Astor, John Jacob - German-born American fur magnate, real estate speculator and financier (1763-1848); founder of the family fortune; his American Fur Company, established in 1808, was the first to seriously challenge international dominance over the fur trade by the Hudson's Bay Company; established the first American post on the West Coast. Early Astor letters are scarce; one with such important content is extraordinarily rare. This letter boasts a remarkably bold signature. (imagea) (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $25,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
107   Astor, John Jacob, Rare business content Autograph Letter Signed John Jacob Astor, 2 pages, 4to, New York, April 26, 1823. Address leaf with Postmaster Free Frank of Jam.
Abbott  P.M. who was also an agent of the American Fur Company. AstorAstor, John Jacob, Rare business content Autograph Letter Signed "John Jacob Astor," 2 pages, 4to, New York, April 26, 1823. Address leaf with Postmaster Free Frank of "Jam. Abbott / P.M." who was also an agent of the American Fur Company. Astor writes to Robert Stuart at Michilimackinac, Michigan Territory:"Since I last wrote to you we have had no letter from you nor have I any thing new to communicate except that the sale of furs in general is wors than it has ben & we feare that both Beaver & Musrat will fall even below our expectations...Good Otter will Do prety well & so will Deer Sell well, but nothing by list. Our goods have not yet arrived...We must Send less goods in the Country & also lesson our expense or we shall Sink our Capital." Much splitting at folds, partly repaired with transparent paper. John Jacob Astor autograph letters are quite uncommon; he is mostly seen in later signed documents, and very rarely in letters concerning the fur trade. (imagea) (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $2,300.00
Will close during Public Auction
108 c   [Astor, William B.] folded letter with integral address leaf written and signed John Jacob Astor & Sons by William B. Astor datelined New York 17 June 1823, manuscript 25 rate
and matching B for steam boat to Robert Stuart at Michilimackm[Astor, William B.] folded letter with integral address leaf written and signed "John Jacob Astor & Sons" by William B. Astor datelined "New York 17 June 1823", manuscript "25" rate and matching "B" for steam boat to Robert Stuart at Michilimackmac (Michigan Territory), fresh and extremely fine.Astor writes regarding the price and demand for beaver: "Your letter of May 20 addressed to our J.J. Astor is at hand - He left here on the 1' for Europe. We regret that there is any part of his instructions respecting prices of Furs which should not be clearly understood by you, as in the case of Beaver mentioned in your letter. We presume the assortment of this article (Beaver) at Mackinac will be much the same as last year, and that the price of $ 3. per lbs was intended to apply to the whole collection as an average .. The manufactures are substituting other Fur for it with great success, and if we may judge from the sales of the season past, we have now more on hand than will supply the demand for a year to come. … We trust Mr Crooks will be with you early in July, and that you will long e'er this be in possession of every information necessary in relation to the arrangement with Stone & Co., & the transfer of the property ….. No change or improvement in the price or demand for Furs."Stone had sold out to Astor on April 1, 1823. See Stone to Crooks, July 6, 1824 in this collection (lot #161). (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
109   Astor, William B., Rare early fur trade content Letter Signed Wm. B. Astor  Presdt. pro tem. AmfCy. 2 pages, 4to, New York, March 24, 1824. He writes the companys agent at
Michilimackinac, Robert Stuart:By recent advices from our Mr. (J.Astor, William B., Rare early fur trade content Letter Signed "Wm. B. Astor / Presdt. pro tem. Am'f'Cy." 2 pages, 4to, New York, March 24, 1824. He writes the company's agent at Michilimackinac, Robert Stuart:"By recent advices from our Mr. (J.J.) Astor in Europe, it appears the prospects for skins of all kind were never less incouraging...It therefore becomes our duty to make our business conform to existing circumstances. Fewer goods must be sent into the country, and the Indians must pay more for them. The number of Traders, Interpreters, Clerks & Boatmen should be reduced...Reduce within the narrowest limits such as are strictly indispensable; and observe the most rigid economy...This has now become absolutely necessary to ensure the company's safety.""Deer skins have fallen. Raccoons are not even enquired for, and muskrats are almost wholly superseded by foreign furs. We have tried to get a duty laid on imported skins generally, but unless the general tarif Bill passes, which is not probably, we will not succeed...I give you a foot note of such alterations as you will make in the list of prices which I authorized you...Mr. Rolette thinks better of his trade than he did." Astor, William B. - American businessman (1792-1875); son of John Jacob Astor, he worked for his father's vast trading empire and became his sole heir, making him the richest man in the country.The present letter gives us the first sign that the fur trade was in trouble. Toward the end of the 1820s, it became clear that the AFC's competition would not be easily defeated, and in the early 1830s beaver hats went out of fashion, fatally injuring the most profitable part of the business. The Astors sold out in 1834 and turned their attention to New York real estate. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
110   [Bent & St. Vrain, Bents Estate] Choice pair of documents regarding the estate of fur trader George Bent, the first a manuscript document signed, October 24, 1847, by mountain
man Thomas Fitzpatrick, as well as William W. Bent, (brother of Ge[Bent & St. Vrain, Bent's Estate] Choice pair of documents regarding the estate of fur trader George Bent, the first a manuscript document signed, October 24, 1847, by mountain man "Thomas Fitzpatrick," as well as "William W. Bent, (brother of George), John L. Hatcher and John S. Smith - a codicil to George's will, including among his heirs a child not born when his original will was written up; and giving the cattle still belonging to him to his company, Bent & St. Vrain (instead of to his wife); and directing that his property be sold and the proceeds, after debts are paid, put toward the support of his children. The second is a partly printed document signed, June 3, 1848, by future Civil War general Francis J. Blair, Jr. (twice), fur trade magnate "Robert Campbell" and the late Bent's partner "Ceran St. Vrain" sign their bond to the state of Missouri for $5,000, St. Louis, June 3, 1848. They bind themselves to faithfully execute Bent's will. The partners in Bent & St. Vrain included both brothers George and William Bent and brothers Ceran and Marcellin St. Vrain, though William Bent and Ceran St. Vrain were the principals. (imagea) (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $3,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
111   [James Bridger and Henry Fraeb] Informative document signed by John P. Sarpy, sometime fur trader. His affidavit, St. Louis, June 20, 1843, that:on the 8th day of August last
he was appointed….administrator of the Estate of Henry Fraeb then la[James Bridger and Henry Fraeb] Informative document signed by John P. Sarpy, sometime fur trader. His affidavit, St. Louis, June 20, 1843, that:"on the 8th day of August last he was appointed….administrator of the Estate of Henry Fraeb then lately deceased. Said Fraeb had been a trader in the mountains, & was at the time of his death in partnership with a man of the name of James Bridger, & said Bridger & Fraeb were indebted to the firm of Pierre Chouteau Jr. Co, & it was feared by the members of said firm...that said Bridger might interpose difficulties in the settlement of the accounts...& for the purposes of doing justice to themselves, as well as to the said Fraeb,...Sarpy applied for letters of administration...The said Bridger has however since this time been here & has settled in full the accounts." Sarpy says that no property of Fraeb's has come into his hands, though some might be in the mountains or in Bridger's hands. Sarpy was not just running Chouteau's errands. He had worked in the mountains with Fraeb. Henry Fraeb was killed on Battle Creek in Colorado; as historian Bernard DeVoto puts it in his classic Across the Wide Missouri, Fraeb died "as a mountain man should, in an all-out battle with the Sioux, taking enough of them to hell with him to pay his toll." Jim Bridger may have been one of the greatest and most beloved of the mountain men, but clearly Chouteau & Co. didn't let that get in the way of business. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $1,700.00
Will close during Public Auction
112   [The Fate of Hiram Scott] Intriguing autograph letter signed, with integral address leaf, by James B. Bruffee, Potosi, MO, September 10, 1829. He writes Robert Campbell, Late
from the Rocky Mountains  Care of Mr. Keyte  St. Louis. Speakin[The Fate of Hiram Scott] Intriguing autograph letter signed, with integral address leaf, by James B. Bruffee, Potosi, MO, September 10, 1829. He writes Robert Campbell, "Late from the Rocky Mountains / Care of Mr. Keyte / St. Louis." Speaking of the Yellowstone country, he hopes that Campbell does not feel the need to return again to that "Horrid Region" but admits that his own financial affairs make it likely that he will once more: "tread the Infernal Confines. Could I gain Cash to justify such a life...and ware there an Opening I would willingly join you...I have for many months past been filled with thoughts...of solicitude for our frd. Mr. (Jedediah) Smith's precarious situation in the mountains and now have those feelings reawakened...A man of his Boldness, prudence, and merit must finally succede. But that he is still safe together with his frds. J & S. (Smith's business partners David Jackson and William Sublette) ...I cant promise myself...a trip to St. Louis unless I can Effect some arrangements to lay in a small stock of Iron & Steel for my winters Business...The great fall in the price of Lead coupled with the Natual Barreness of the Country is grievously felt...Be good Enough to mention in you next communication what particular Vestiges you seen of the remains of unfortunate Scott, where he made is exit, &c.. We have Enjoyed pretty uniform health since my return from Little Lake (Bear Lake, Utah)...While I was absent I lost a much beloved and promising little son." Seal hole in last page affecting one word.Bruffee had gone to the 1827 rendezvous at Bear Lake with supplies for Smith, Jackson, & Sublette. Among his crew was Hiram Scott, who had become ill on the way to rendezvous. Bruffee and his men began their return trip with the promise that they would stop for Scott and two others to catch up with them at the steep bluffs on the south side of the North Platte River in present-day Nebraska. When Scott and the others arrived there in 1838, Bruffee and his men were nowhere to be found. The two men with Scott were forced to leave him lest they die in the wilderness. William Sublette later found his remains and buried them; the bluff where they were found has since been known as Scotts Bluff. Most likely Bruffee only learned of Scott's death in the letter from Robert Campbell to which he is responding here, hence his request for more information. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,200.00
Will close during Public Auction
113   [Selling Liquor to the Indians, Calhoun, John C.] Excellent fur trade and Native American relations manuscript Letter Signed J.C. Calhoun as Secretary of War, 3-13 pages, 4to,
(Washington), April 26, 1822. Calhoun writes Indian agent Lawrence[Selling Liquor to the Indians, Calhoun, John C.] Excellent fur trade and Native American relations manuscript Letter Signed "J.C. Calhoun" as Secretary of War, 3-1/3 pages, 4to, (Washington), April 26, 1822. Calhoun writes Indian agent Lawrence Taliaferro in St. Peters, Michigan Territory (present-day Minnesota), in response to the agent's report about matters in his district:"It is difficult, under the present laws, to prescribe any particular course...toawards Pezan & Mayrand, who appear from your statement to be in the employment of the American fur company. You will, however, keep your eye upon them, and Rolette, whose character is well known here...Their conduct in selling spiritous liquors to the Indians is very reprehensible, and if you should have sufficient evidence...you are authorized to seize all such liquor...and destroy it, if it cannot be sold without danger of its falling into the hands of the Indians." "...The part which the Sioux Chief, the Leaf, has acted towards Mr. Grigrion (Augustin Grignon) a trader whom you state to be regularly licensed by the Indian Agent at Green Bay is viewed as unfriendly to the Government and you will represent to him in strong and spirited terms..." "This Department has been informed that the Sacs & Foxes complain that they have suffered by the interference of the Government in the War between them and the Sioux...The Government is very desirious that peace Should be made...and as the Sioux have been the aggressors it is deemed proper that they should move first...Use your exertions to force them to do so. The Agents at Prairie du Chien & Fort Armstrong have been instructed to cooperate with you".Some partial fold separation. Minor loss at bottom not affecting legibility. Augustin Grignon had been granted a license to trade with the Native Americans, but Chief Leaf, probably at the instigation of Joseph Rolette, abducted him for invading Sioux lands and threatened to kill him. In order to make the message stick, they burned his trading house. He was obliged to relocate 25 miles away. Robert Dickson was a British soldier and Indian agent. He would die suddenly within the year.Calhoun, John C. - American statesman (1782-1850); Vice President of the United States; US Secretary of War and Secretary of State; Senator and Representative from South Carolina. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $4,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
114   [Campbell, Robert] Three very early letters to Campbell in St. Louis, all 1825, from business colleagues. The first, from Cape Girardeau, MO, is from James Keyte on April 30, sending goods up the Mississippi on the Phoenix. Keyte writes again on May 9, this time from Wheeling, (now WV), during a trip East. Because of low water, he will skip Pittsburgh, and will take the mail stage to Baltimore. Keyte's instructions to Campbell about their stores suggests that he is in the position of authority. Eventually Campbell would become one of the richest men in St. Louis.The third, from Philadelphia, is from Robert Wiley on May 25, while he is apparently being visited by Keyte, who carried the letter back to St. Louis. He reports that business is slow, and "nearly every species of merchandise has advanced in Value in consequence of which country dealers have curtailed their orders.. A few years like the present would convert the whole of you southern & western folks into nabobs...Your time is coming." All letters suffer from condition problems.In 1832, Keyte would found the town that still bears his name, Keytesville, Missouri. The year 1825 would later see Campbell's first expedition to the Rocky Mountains, in the company of Jedediah Smith of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company. Est. $300-400

SOLD for $325.00
Will close during Public Auction
115   [Campbell, Robert] Thirteen letters written to Campbell, 1830-43 with two documents concerning his business. Correspondents include George Ash, James Preston, John Kelly & Co,
Austin Raines (who may have been among the Ashley Hundred), Campbell[Campbell, Robert] Thirteen letters written to Campbell, 1830-43; with two documents concerning his business. Correspondents include George Ash, James Preston, John Kelly & Co, Austin Raines (who may have been among the Ashley Hundred), Campbell's uncle Thomas, and Sublette & Campbell (by Wm. Campbell's hand). Interesting business and personal content. With an interesting letter to his wife, Virginia, from her mother in Raleigh. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,600.00
Will close during Public Auction
116   [Beautiful Squaws of the Rocky Mountains, Robert Campbell] Exceptional content autograph letter signed by Mary Campbell, his sister-in-law, Richmond, VA, August 3, 1831. She
writes Campbell in St. Louis, telling him his brother, Hugh:left me l[Beautiful Squaws of the Rocky Mountains, Robert Campbell] Exceptional content autograph letter signed by Mary Campbell, his sister-in-law, Richmond, VA, August 3, 1831. She writes Campbell in St. Louis, telling him his brother, Hugh:"left me last Sunday week for N. York, now if he had taken the idea before you left us, you I am sure would have been good natured enough to have remained...Now we are without a gentleman in the house, four poor creatures, that are afraid of our own shadows. I expect Mr. C home on tuesday...and this is positively the last time that he shall make his appearence on any of the northern boards without me... I hope it may be there or some other civilized place you will fetch upon. I beg of you Robert not to think of the wild woods again, or trapping or buffaloe hunting or, last but not least the beautiful, interesting squaws of the Rocky Mountains. I am convinced that when you are once more engaged in business..you will be contented." Light fold wear. With "RICHd AUG 4" postmark and 25 cent rate. Robert Campbell must have told his brother and his family about the wild times at the yearly Rocky Mountain rendezvous, where trappers and mountain men gathered to sell their pelts and engage in legendary revelry. With no white women for over a thousand miles, the trappers and traders often took up with Native American women, and even married them. These relationships were not quite like Christian marriages, and could be terminated by either partner. At the time of this letter, Campbell was just 27 years old, but of the proper age to settle down. He would finish his wandering in 1834, and finally marry in 1841. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
117   [Campbell, Robert] A most curious autograph letter signed by James L. Dobbin to Campbell, Franklin, Missouri, February 5, 1832. He writes that there are no mules: Capn.
Bonnneville, perhaps Robideaux, having purchased all except Six, that S. R[Campbell, Robert] A most curious autograph letter signed by James L. Dobbin to Campbell, Franklin, Missouri, February 5, 1832. He writes that there are no mules: "Capn. Bonnneville, perhaps Robideaux, having purchased all except Six, that S. Rennick reserved for his own use...I still remain under petticoat patronage as yet...I would be much pleased to hear from you giving me some idea of the extent and number of the Adventurers to the Mountains and Santafe...I hope it is not an affair of the heart that causes time to hang so heavily on your hands; if so on your way out I would recommend a short residence in the Tubbs Grove about 1 Mile from the Bridge as an effectual Cure for such a Complaint." At the time Campbell and William Sublette were trying to outfit for their venture into supplying fur traders at the yearly rendezvous. One can only guess what went on at Tubbs Grove! (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $550.00
Will close during Public Auction
118   Campbell, Robert and William L. Sublette, Great combination Letter Signed by Robert Campbell and William Sublette, Philadelphia, December 24, 1832. The partners are in
Philadelphia to outfit for providing supplies to the fur trappers of the RockyCampbell, Robert and William L. Sublette, Great combination Letter Signed by Robert Campbell and William Sublette, Philadelphia, December 24, 1832. The partners are in Philadelphia to outfit for providing supplies to the fur trappers of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company:"...We presented your letters to Ferguson Jones & Co. They appeared solicitous to do all they could for us but have on hands very few articles in our line...Mackinaw Blankets are very scarce here and Fuzees are not to be obtained at any price. Scalping knives too are scarcer and cannot be obtained in this market. Mr. Gill the former partner of Mr. Ferguson is now connected with Hugh Campbell (brother to Robert Campbell)...and will of course do all they can for us...In consequence of the Tariff on wooden goods going into operation in the beginning of March by which a considerable reduction on duty takes place the Merchants have declined importing...The bill of Beads we have not yet ascertained...Powder seems to be an article that is always sold for cash." Seal hole affecting postscript. With a stain in bottom third of all pages and fold wear on third page. Sublette would get his powder, but the partners would have to travel to New York for many supplies. See other letters from Sublette to Ashley Lot 165 -168). (imagea) (Image) Est. $4-5,000

SOLD for $6,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
119   Campbell, Robert Good Autograph Letter Signed Robert Campbell, 1-13 pages, 4to, St. Louis, November 24, 1842. To J.P. Helferson in Lexington, MO. He has sent Mr. Tevis to Mr.
McIntosh to collect his debts and finds him unable to pay now, but lCampbell, Robert Good Autograph Letter Signed "Robert Campbell," 1-1/3 pages, 4to, St. Louis, November 24, 1842. To J.P. Helferson in Lexington, MO. He has sent Mr. Tevis to Mr. McIntosh to collect his debts and finds him unable to pay now, but likely to make an arrangement. Also mentions that: "Everything remains Excessively dull here - we are selling no goods and collecting no money." Ink somewhat light. Unlike most of his contemporaries, Robert Campbell was truly successful in the fur trade and the expansion of the West, probably because he had the foresight to diversify into real estate while the fur business became increasingly unprofitable. (imagea) (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $475.00
Will close during Public Auction
120   [Campbell and McKenzie] Manuscript document signed by Robert Campbell, and K. Mackenzie, March 19, 1856. Articles of agreement between Campbell and Northrup & Chick on the one
hand and Kenneth McKenzie, who has: purchased of Northrup & Chi[Campbell and McKenzie] Manuscript document signed by "Robert Campbell," and "K. Mackenzie," March 19, 1856. Articles of agreement between Campbell and Northrup & Chick on the one hand and Kenneth McKenzie, who has: "purchased of Northrup & Chick their entire collection of Buffalo Robes Furs Peltries etc. which they may have in the season...until the 15th July 1856 at the following prices, viz, Raccoon Fifty six cents...Large Wolf...(1.50)...Small Wolf one dollar...Wild Cat Thirty five cents...Mink One dollar...Grey Fox thirty five cents...Badger Thirty cents...Opossum Eleven cents...Pole Cat twenty five cents...Muskrat Ten cents...Panther One dollar...Otter Two dollars...Beaver Two dollars per pound, Black Bear Three dollars...Shaved Deer Skins Fifty one cents per pound" and so on. At his own expense, McKenzie will receive the skins and robes at St. Louis, and consign them to Campbell, at which time McKenzie will pay for them. Though McKenzie is supposed to have spent his last days (he would die in 1861) farming in Missouri, we see here that he still had a finger in the fur trade, despite having been fired by the American Fur Company in 1834 for selling his own moonshine to Native Americans. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,100.00
Will close during Public Auction

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