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POSTMARKS BY STATE continued...

RHODE ISLAND
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
1121 c   Fort Wolcott, (Rhode Island) Nov 25th, 1802, dateline on folded cover with integral address leaf to Philadelphia with manuscript Public Service endorsement, light Newport,
R.I. datestamp, very fine.In the letter written by Capt. Lewis Howard,Fort Wolcott, (Rhode Island) Nov 25th, 1802, dateline on folded cover with integral address leaf to Philadelphia with manuscript "Public Service" endorsement, light "Newport, R.I." datestamp, very fine.In the letter written by Capt. Lewis Howard, Artillery to William Linnard, Military Agent in Philadelphia, Howard advises Linnard that on Gaston Point there is no public property except "four 32 pounders (dismounted)" Also the circular Battery was built on such "bad materials, (and the workmanship I believe very bad) that the tides and winds will undermine the Battery." Fort Wolcott on Goat Island in the center of Newport Harbor was started in 1798. Troops were finally withdrawn on 22 May, 1836. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $400.00
Will close during Public Auction
TEXAS
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
1122 c   Fort Quitman, TexasFeb 1 (1861), perfectly struck blue postmark applied on the first day of the Independent State of Texas to 3c Red on white Star die entire (U26) uprated
with 3c Dull red (26), both cancelled by matching open grid, addresFort Quitman, Texas/Feb 1 (1861), perfectly struck blue postmark applied on the first day of the Independent State of Texas to 3c Red on white Star die entire (#U26) uprated with 3c Dull red (#26), both cancelled by matching open grid, addressed to Johnston, Rhode island, very fine.In the long ten page historical letter the sender writes under the dateline "Fort Quitman Texas, January 29th 1861": "...that Texas was going out [of the Union] on the 28th of the month [January]." The sender then goes on to describe Fort Quitman: "The dust on the parade ground in the winter is about 6 inches deep, in the summer it is all dust."Texas seceded on 1 February, 1861 and was not admitted to the Confederacy until 6 March, 1861. Fort Quitman was a stage station on the Overland mail route. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $30,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
1123 c   Texas cover balance of 29 covers, the great majority of which are fort cancels, including blue Fort Quitman with 1860 letter, 1854 manuscript Fort Inge, 1880, 1883 and 1887 Fort Davis, Fort McKavett tying 3c Ultramarine (#114), 1850's Fort Clark, 1860 Manuscript Camp Hudson, two 1880's Fort Stockton, one registered, 1885 violet Camp Rice, 1891 Fort Hancock, March 19th, 1861 manuscript Fort Quitman on 3c Star die (CSA period) with interesting letter that entered the mails with Fort Davis datestamp, 1880 Fort Griffin, 1878 Fort Elliott, 1878 and 1881 Fort Concho, also includes straightline Uvalde tying pair 3c Dull red (#26) and 1849 Port Caddo, a few stamp or cover faults, mostly fine-very fine covers and strikes. Est. $3,000-4,000

SOLD for $14,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
WASHINGTON
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
1124   [Washington Territory, Jefferson Davis and Isaac Stevens] Choice pair of Notes Signed by Davis as Secretary of War, (signing as Jeffer: Davis and as J.D.), denying a request
made in an LS by Stevens while governor of the Washington Territory,[Washington Territory, Jefferson Davis and Isaac Stevens] Choice pair of Notes Signed by Davis as Secretary of War, (signing as "Jeffer: Davis" and as "J.D."), denying a request made in an LS by Stevens while governor of the Washington Territory, February 10, 1854. Stevens writes:"...urging the importance to this territory of a direct mail communication with San Francisco and also soliciting the establishment of some weekly mail communication by steam vessels between Olympia, at the head of Budd's Inlet, the Seat of Government...and Whatcom on Bellingham Bay, touching at the various settlements on Puget Sound & Admiralty Inlet...I beg to call your attention to the bearing which such a service would have on the defenses of the Territory, as well as upon its business relations." Davis agrees that the service would be useful, but does not deem it of sufficient importance for the War Department to foot the bill; separated fold, and fold wear; the additional Davis note refers the matter to the quartermaster's department, and receives the response of General Jesup. (imagea) (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
1125 c   Camp Simeahmoo, Washington Territory, well struck Camp Simeahmoo, W.T.1858 datestamp with Nov 6 date added by hand on yellow cover with 10c Green, Ty. II (32, small faults)
tied by fancy five-point star cancellation, addressed to Mrs. J.W.Camp Simeahmoo, Washington Territory, well struck "Camp Simeahmoo, W.T./1858" datestamp with "Nov 6" date added by hand on yellow cover with 10c Green, Ty. II (#32, small faults) tied by fancy five-point star cancellation, addressed to Mrs. J.W. Denver in Washington, D.C., stained spot in postmark, otherwise very fine and rare.This cover was sent by August V. Kautz to his cousin, who was the wife of General James W. Denver. Kautz had emigrated from Germany to Ohio and was graduated from West Point in the class of 1848. At the time of this letter he was a Lieutenant. During the Civil War he rose to Brigadier General and then to Major General in 1864-65. He was a member of the military commission that tried the conspirators for the assassination of President Lincoln. (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $3,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
1126 c   Fort Colville, Washington Territory, clear Fort Colville, W.T.Mar 15 datestamp on cover with 10c Green (68, damaged) tied by target cancel, to Nanaimo, Vancouver Island,
British Columbia, slightly reduced at right, very fine.The Fort ColvilleFort Colville, Washington Territory, clear "Fort Colville, W.T./Mar 15" datestamp on cover with 10c Green (#68, damaged) tied by target cancel, to Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, slightly reduced at right, very fine.The Fort Colville Post Office was established in 1858 as a base of operation for the northwest boundary commission survey. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $475.00
Will close during Public Auction
1127 c   [The Battle of Seattle, Washington Territory 1856], cover to Auburn, California with great historical letter describing the battle with the Indians for the village of Seattle
written by William Heebner from Port Madison March 29, 1856 and franked[The Battle of Seattle, Washington Territory 1856], cover to Auburn, California with great historical letter describing the battle with the Indians for the village of Seattle written by William Heebner from Port Madison March 29, 1856 and franked by 3c Dull red (#11) with manuscript cancel and matching "Seattle W.T./April 1" postmark, cover edge wear and soiling, fine." ... I have been somewhat tardy in answering on account of these exciting times of war. Govn. Stevens (lsaac) has returned safe, though there is no prospects of an early peace. It seams you heard of the death of Lieutenant Slaughter (W.A.) which occurred at Brannan's place - there was two others killed and two mortally wounded. On the 26th of Jan the Indians attacked Seattle with the suppose number of 700 they fired all day on the town from the edge of the woods - the sloop of war' (USS Decatur) fired bombs all day until 11 oclock at night when the Indians retired - the Indians killed two whites the little Holgate boy and Bob Wilson - the boy was standing in the fort door - the other was in the act of going to Simon's house - the Indians shot well - it is not know(n) how many Indians were killed as the whites fired from behind the stumps &c - in town neither party advance or retired. Hewitt's (Captain Christopher) Co had disbanded 3 days before the attack therefore there was no commander of the land forces - ever one fought or fired in the woods on his own hook - the Indians had complete possession of the whole country with the exception of Seattle, the stock and all which they have driven off and killed - more than half in this county they have burned all the buildings on the Deuwanish rivers excepting Stewards house & Tim Groves, and perhaps Eli Maples - all the stock that has been saved the Indians has brought in town at various times since the attack - there has been another company organized for six months under Cpt Lander (Judge Edward M., chief justice) though they have not been in the field as yet though there has been a number of regulars soldiers arrived who has taken the field - they are posted on White & Green river(s) building forts. Whe have had some engagements with the enemy of the particulars I have not heard - only the soldiers routed the Indians in every case -.... Gen Wool (John E.) has been here and has gone to Calia. for more troops as he has saw they are needed on this side of the Cascades mountains...Governor Stevens has given Pat Canana a commission to take his tribe in the field - he has brought 4 heads - 2 from Snquolomie (Snoqualmie Falls)- 2 from White river where he engaged Lshi (Chief Leschi)...Col Casy has command of the regular forces on this side of mountains. The S(t)eamer Massachusetts is .. at Seattle ..We are assuming quite a war like attitude. I think we shall soon be able to take charge of the country an maintain our position - the Indians has their way quite long enough and rather too long as there has been considerable number of good inhabitance driven out the Territory from pure necessity who will not be apt to return..."The western "Horse" tribes of Indians waged a bloody war against the whites which began with the Battle of Seattle 26 January, 1856. The battle lasted all day and into the night. If it had not been for the assistance of the sloop of war Decatur, lying in the sound, Seattle might have been wiped off the map. This is one of the few instances in which the navy has been of assistance to the army in the Indian wars. (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
WISCONSIN
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
1128   [Wisconsin, Ferry Across the Wisconsin River] Interesting pair of autograph letters signed, 1840, between Oliver Phelps of Canandaiga, NY, and Henry Abel of Galena, IL, on the
same four-page sheet (including address panel) regarding a ferry acros[Wisconsin, Ferry Across the Wisconsin River] Interesting pair of autograph letters signed, 1840, between Oliver Phelps of Canandaiga, NY, and Henry Abel of Galena, IL, on the same four-page sheet (including address panel) regarding a ferry across the Wisconsin River near Prairie du Chien. With a wonderful hand-drawn Map of the immediate area, with townships, roads, rivers, ferries, villages, and swamps all clearly represented. With an 1838 letter from Niles, with "Niles / MIC.T." postmark and free rate (as it is to GW Jones, Wisconsin's delegate to Congress) asking about the Chippewa Treaty; and a postmaster's bill from Grand Cakalin, 1837, signed by A. Grignon. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $550.00
Will close during Public Auction
1129   [Racine, Wisconsin, Bonham Murder], four important legal history items concerning the murder of Henry Keene, the first in the newly formed Waukesha County, Wisconsin, by David
Bonham in May 1846. Bonham was convicted and sentenced to be executed[Racine, Wisconsin, Bonham Murder], four important legal history items concerning the murder of Henry Keene, the first in the newly formed Waukesha County, Wisconsin, by David Bonham in May 1846. Bonham was convicted and sentenced to be executed; the present material concerns appeals for a remittance of his sentence. Includes a printed Petition to Wisconsin Governor Henry Dodge, signed by F.W. Horn, a local justice of the peace. He represents to the governor that Bonham should not be hanged,"Because the evidence...left it very doubtful whether Mr. Bonham did not kill Mr. Keene in self-defense, as it was proved...that at the instant the mortal wound was inflicted...Mr. Kenne was aiming a deadly blow at the head of Mr. Bonham, with a heavy iron mill-dog (an iron bar used in lumber milling; Bonham and Keene disputed ownership of a sawmill) ...Mr. Bonham was proved...to have been .. otherwise fine the best character for humanity.. to have been an active and useful member of society - a strong advocate of its peace and good order." He is also a family man, and Horn does not believe the crime was premeditated. He adds his own note at the close suggesting that Bonham should be pardoned entirely.With an autograph postscript by David Bonham (rest of letter not present) on the verso of the address panel of a letter to Byron Kilbourn of Milwaukee, January 14, 1847. He pleads, "Could I but get a pardon I would leave the territory forthwith Should the governor request it...I think my friends would bail me, for my God knows that could I once get out of this, they never would Catch Dave Bonham in another Scrape...God knows that the thought of fireing the gun never entered my head nor heart, more than 1/4 of a minute before it was done and not till he was within a 2d...of strikeing me with that deadly weapon." With his letter of January 27, to John J. Haight, probably a state legislator, in Madison, lamenting, "I learn that His Excellency has rejected my application for a commutation of my Sentence. This of course seals my fate...Altho I know I must meet my God next Wednesday (February 3) ...O dear friend I beg and pray of you to aid if possible in amending the act relative to Capital punishment, so as to Save me from death," adding in a postscript, "In the name of humanity pass an act haveing in its object the 1st 2d and 3d degree of murder and define the first degree, so that no man Shall die for Such an act done in an offway...innocent of an intent to Kill...even if it cant help me any."With a choice letter by a woman named Harriet of Racine, February 28, 1847, to her nephew in Moravia, NY. She explains that Bonham has already received two reprieves of his execution, but "is to be hung on wednesday of this week" (March 3). He was to be hanged on February 3, and "every necessary preparation was made for his execution and burial, even to the coffin, and grave clothes. Many people came in from the country...A company of soldiers ..Soon after a man came...with another respit of thirty days...Five hundred had come to town...some of them were so mad...that they threatened to burn the court house and jail, if Bonham was not brought out and hung...So they stuffed old clothes, with straw...swung it on a pole, and then set fire to it. Another respit will not be granted"The day after this letter, Governor Dodge commuted Bonham's sentence. He was eventually released from prison, moved to Missouri, and lived another 23 years. It is still unclear whether he acted in self-defense or killed Keene deliberately because he had begun to dismantle the mill whose ownership was in question. Wisconsin now distinguishes clearly between homicide in self-defense, a privileged act that might not warrant prosecution, and first or second degree intentional homicide. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $400.00
Will close during Public Auction
1130   Chapmans Sectional Map of Wisconsin, W Silas Chapman. Milwaukee, L. Lipman, 1869. 32.5 by 24.5 folded to 16mo in green cloth. Hand tinted, light foxing and toning, usual minor
fold wear.Chapman's Sectional Map of Wisconsin, W Silas Chapman. Milwaukee, L. Lipman, 1869. 32.5" by 24.5" folded to 16mo in green cloth. Hand tinted, light foxing and toning, usual minor fold wear. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $190.00
Will close during Public Auction
1131 c   Cassville, Michigan Territory, clear July 17th manuscript Michigan territorial period postmark, present day Wisconsin, and matching FreeJ.P. Hawley PM on 1829 folded cover
with integral address leaf to his brother the postmaster at FrelighsburCassville, Michigan Territory, clear July 17th manuscript Michigan territorial period postmark, present day Wisconsin, and matching "Free/J.P. Hawley PM" on 1829 folded cover with integral address leaf to his brother the postmaster at Frelighsburg, Lower Canada, endorsed "Via Franklin Vt." at lower left, red "American Postage/Ferriage/Forwarded" stamp and "FREE" handstamp applied at the Canadian frontier, "Niagara, U.C./1829" and "Montreal/Aug 31" transit postmarks, fine; the earliest reported Cassville postmark. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $900.00
Will close during Public Auction
1132   [Lapointe, Wisconsin, frontier physician] A fine autograph letter signed by Dr. Charles W. Borup, from Lapointe, Wisconsin Territory, September 16, 1840. He writes David Oakes
in Grandville, Michigan, with some family news and to request that he[Lapointe, Wisconsin, frontier physician] A fine autograph letter signed by Dr. Charles W. Borup, from Lapointe, Wisconsin Territory, September 16, 1840. He writes David Oakes in Grandville, Michigan, with some family news and to request that he make sure his fire insurance is paid up. Manuscript postmark "Falls St. Croix / W. Ter Dec. 14," 25 rate being the earliest reported postmark. With an 1850 letter from Oakes at Lapointe, to his son John in St. Clair, MI. Dr. Borup, a native of Denmark, had been in Wisconsin since the 1830s, assisting both Native Americans and white settlers with his impressive medical knowledge. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $425.00
Will close during Public Auction
1133 c   Fort Winnebago - M.T., bold straightline postmark as Michigan Territory, present day Wisconsin, and manuscript 20 July and 25 rate on 1831 folded letter with integral address
leaf to Brigadier General Brady at Detroit, fresh and extremely finFort Winnebago - M.T., bold straightline postmark as Michigan Territory, present day Wisconsin, and manuscript "20 July" and "25" rate on 1831 folded letter with integral address leaf to Brigadier General Brady at Detroit, fresh and extremely fine; the earliest recorded postmark in addition to being the only known example of this straightline handstamp; ex-Jarrett.The letter is written by Captain Joseph C. Plymouth, 5th Infantry, commanding. It is a "Detailed report of the encroachment of the wites upon Indian lands in the vicinity of the Fort." Most of the "whites" were contractors, trappers and traders.Fort Winnebago was constructed by troops under the command of Major David E. Twiggs during the years 1828-31. It was located in the Winnebago country, at the portage between the Wisconsin and Fox rivers, about half way between Fort Howard on Green Bay and Fort Crawford at the confluence of the Wisconsin and Mississippi rivers, in what was then the Michigan Territory. As a military post it played an important part in the Black Hawk War. In 1845 the post was closed and the troops were withdrawn for service in the Mexican War. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,900.00
Will close during Public Auction
1134 c   Fort Winnebago, two folded letters with integral address leaves, first with the earliest reported strike of the Ty. II postmark Fort Winnebago, M.T. with manuscript Mar 16
date on 1832 folded letter with 25 rate to Pittsburgh, the seconFort Winnebago, two folded letters with integral address leaves, first with the earliest reported strike of the Ty. II postmark "Fort Winnebago, M.T." with manuscript "Mar 16" date on 1832 folded letter with "25" rate to Pittsburgh, the second an 1837 folded letter with "Fort Winnebago" handstamp with the "M" of the postmark cut out and manuscript "W" inserted, since it was now in Wisconsin Territory, manuscript "Mar 4" date and the free frank of postmaster H. Merrill, this being the only recorded example, as well as the earliest use of a handstamp from this office under the Wisconsin Territory; former restored by silking, latter extremely fine.In the first letter James Gardner, a soldier stationed at the fort, writes to his Aunt on March 4,1832: "I have had to mount another guard since I commenced this letter. For my own part I feel estranged from all the world destined to spend my best days in the wilderness surrounded by Savages - who would not hesitate On the least Provocation to bury their tomahawks in us - but they are rather afraid of the long knives as we are termed. We have not been disturbed by them yet at this Post - but at Rock Island and Praierie du Chien they have committed depredations on Indians that were under the protection of the American Flag and likewise on several famelies who were residing on the Frontiers - Several Chiefs have been taken and are about to atone with their lives for their barbarities." He then tells about the murder of an officer, by a private who had been put under restraint, at Green Bay. Also about the extreme cold weather - 32 below zero. It would be only two and a half months after this letter was written, that the Black Hawk War began - May 13,1832.On the night of July 31,1831 a large party of Sauk & Foxes attacked a sleeping village of Menominee Indians and massacred 25 who were sleeping off a drunken debauch. This was only one of many incidents that led to the Black Hawk War. (imagea) (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,150.00
Will close during Public Auction
1135 c   Fort Winnebago, Ouisconsin Territory, manuscript Ft Winnebago O. T.March 31 postmark on folded letter with integral address leaf with manuscript 25 rate crossed out and
replaced by On public service, addressed to general Nathan Towson at WFort Winnebago, Ouisconsin Territory, manuscript "Ft Winnebago O. T./March 31" postmark on folded letter with integral address leaf with manuscript "25" rate crossed out and replaced by "On public service," addressed to general Nathan Towson at Washington, D.C., very fine.The use of the "O" in the territorial designation has never been determined, only that it is inexplicable. The following historical explanation might serve until an more definitive one comes along. The early French spelling was "Ouisconsin," which probably was derived from the Algonquin name for the river that bears the name today - Wisconsin. Father Louis Hennepin was the first to use Ouisconsin when he ascended the river in 1680. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $375.00
Will close during Public Auction
1136 c   Green Bay, Michigan Territory, bold June 13 manuscript postmark and matching 25 rate while Michigan Territory on fresh 1832 folded letter with integral address leaf to
Detroit, usual file fold through postmark, very fine.Green Bay, Michigan Territory, bold June 13 manuscript postmark and matching "25" rate while Michigan Territory on fresh 1832 folded letter with integral address leaf to Detroit, usual file fold through postmark, very fine. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $300.00
Will close during Public Auction
1137 c   Green Bay, Wisconsin three territorial period postmarks, first a rare straightline Green Bay - M.T. handstamp and manuscript Dec 12th 1833 and 25 rate while Michigan Territory
on folded letter with integral address leaf to Detroit, secoGreen Bay, Wisconsin three territorial period postmarks, first a rare straightline "Green Bay - M.T." handstamp and manuscript "Dec 12th 1833" and "25" rate while Michigan Territory on folded letter with integral address leaf to Detroit, second manuscript "Green Bay W T/Aug 9" Wisconsin Territorial period postmark with "50" rate on 1836 folded letter with integral address leaf to Cincinnati, the last a clear red straightline "Green Bay, W.T./Sept 19" Wisconsin Territorial period postmark with "25" rate on 1836 folded letter with integral address leaf to Sconondoa, N.Y., first slightly affected by file fold, still a fresh and very fine group. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $1,700.00
Will close during Public Auction
1138   [Green Bay Missionary] Interesting content autograph letter signed by missionary Jerimiah Porter to his father William in Hadley, MA, Green Bay, February 16, 1853. With
February 23 Green Bay  Wis.T. postmark. Porter writes in part about the fi[Green Bay Missionary] Interesting content autograph letter signed by missionary Jerimiah Porter to his father William in Hadley, MA, Green Bay, February 16, 1853. With February 23 "Green Bay / Wis.T." postmark. Porter writes in part about the final days of Judge John Lawe, late of the American Fur Company and an Indian trader. "He has left a large family of children by an Indian wife, she died some years since...Her children are papists. He...has uterly neglected religion himself...His firends now look upon him as having died a good Catholic. The amount of his religion consisted in this: He expressed a wish to be buried beside his wife. This he could not be unles he was baptised." With a lively account of the funeral sermon. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $400.00
Will close during Public Auction
1139 c   Milwakee, Michigan Territory, manuscript November 17 Michigan territorial period postmark and matching 18 3(4) rate on 1835 folded letter with integral address leaf to
Marshall, Michigan Territory, fresh and very fine.Milwakee, Michigan Territory, manuscript November 17 Michigan territorial period postmark and matching "18 3/(4)" rate on 1835 folded letter with integral address leaf to Marshall, Michigan Territory, fresh and very fine. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $260.00
Will close during Public Auction
1140 c   New Diggings, Wisconsin Territory three territorial period postmarks, first a bold straightline NEW DIGGINGS DEC with manuscript W.T. and 8 day and 10 rate added on 1845
folded letter with integral address leaf to Cumberland, Maine, seconNew Diggings, Wisconsin Territory three territorial period postmarks, first a bold straightline "NEW DIGGINGS DEC" with manuscript "W.T." and "8" day and "10" rate added on 1845 folded letter with integral address leaf to Cumberland, Maine, second another straightline "NEW DIGGINGS WT" with matching "10" in circle rate and "Mar 9th" manuscript date on 1846 folded letter with integral address leaf to New York, last an arc "New Diggings. W.T." postmark with matching "10" in circle rate and "July 10" date on 1847 folded letter with integral address leaf to New York, last two with file fold slightly affecting postmark, still very fine and scarce group. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,350.00
Will close during Public Auction

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