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EXPLORATION AND WAR continued...

THE OREGON TRAIL continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
421   The Illustrated Hand-Book, a New Guide for Travelers Through the United States of America..., John Calvin Smith. NY, Sherman and Smith, 1847. 12mo, brown cloth with gilt title,
design, and spine. Owners 1847 pen identification on free frontThe Illustrated Hand-Book, a New Guide for Travelers Through the United States of America..., John Calvin Smith. NY, Sherman and Smith, 1847. 12mo, brown cloth with gilt title, design, and spine. Owner's 1847 pen identification on free front endpaper. Hand-colored map with inset of California, Oregon, and Santa Fe, folded into rear cover. Map with fold wear but no apparent separations. Cover rubbed and bumped, foxed extremities. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $1,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
422   Horns Overland Guide, from the U. S. Indian Sub-Agency...to...Sacramento. Hosea B. Horn. NY, 1852 - 1st Ed - early Mixed Issue - 16mo, - orig cloth with gilt title - With
folding map, with route outlined in red, folding into orig cover. DampHorn's Overland Guide, from the U. S. Indian Sub-Agency...to...Sacramento. Hosea B. Horn. NY, 1852 - 1st Ed - early Mixed Issue - 16mo, - orig cloth with gilt title - With folding map, with route outlined in red, folding into orig cover. Dampstain to wraps and first 30 pages or so. Owner's pen notes on blank endpapers, with juvenile pencil drawings on front endpapers. Later owner label on front pastedown. Some toning with two foxing spots on map, which is otherwise pristine, fine. (Image) Est. $3,000-4,000

SOLD for $4,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
423   [Western Trails] Books: The Western Tourist, and Emigrant's Guide, with a Compendious Gazeteer... JC Smith. NY: Colton, 1852 - 16mo, - orig green cloth with gilt title and designs - With folding colored map. Merchant's handstamp on map verso. Risvold owner label on front endpaper. Front endpaper affixed to pastedown, with earlier red ink identification bleeding through to title page. Small hole and dampstain on title page, soiling of wraps. Across the Plains in '64. JS Collins. Omaha, NE, National Printing Co., 1904. 12mo, illustrated green cloth with gilt title and spine. Rubbed, lightly shaken, with crack to front hinge, small loss to free front endpaper. Western Missions and Missionaries: A series of Letters. PJ DeSmet. Modern facsimile reprint (1973) of the original 1853 edition, with choice pressed and gilt cover illustrations. 8vo, red cloth. Beyond the Mississippi... AD Richardson. Hartford, American Publishing Co., (1867). 8vo, later full leather with gilt spine. Risvold label on front pastedown. The River of the West. FF Victor. Hartford, Columbian Book Co., 1871. 8vo, green cloth with gilt bear illustration, spine. Library label on spine. With library and Risvold labels on pastedown. Bumped corners, ink stain to last few leaves and back cover. Trails of Yesterday. J Bratt. Lincoln, Chicago, and Dallas, University Publishing, 1921. 8vo, blue cloth with gilt and orange design, gilt spine and tops. Onion skin dust jacket. Photographic frontis. Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage. CA Strahorn. New York, GP Putnam's Sons/Knickerbocker, 1911. 8vo, green cloth with gilt title, spine, and tops; printed illustration pasted to cover. Illustrated endpapers. Clipping laid in. Bookseller's cataloging tipped to free endpaper. Est. $500-750

SOLD for $550.00
Will close during Public Auction
424   [Oregon Trail] A trio of important Books: Message from the President In Answer to a Resolution of the Senate Relative to the British Establishments on the Columbia. Andrew Jackson. Washington, 1831. 8vo, modern green cloth with blank modern paper bound in for fullness, gilt spine. Interior lightly toned. Narrative of a Journey Across the Rocky Mountains to the Columbia River... JK Townsend. Philadelphia, Henry Perkins, 1839 First edition. 8vo, modern blue cloth with gilt spine. Old presentation inscription on original free endpaper. Risvold label on pastedown. The Diaries of Henry H. Spalding and Asa Bowen Smith relating to the Nez Perce Mission, 1838-1842. CM Drury, ed. Glendale, CA, Arthur H. Clark, 1958. 8vo, blue cloth with gilt spine. Some wear to wraps, interior pristine. Est. $500-750

SOLD for $375.00
Will close during Public Auction
425 c   [First mail of Astoria, Oregon] folded letter with integral address leaf addressed to Sonoma upper California, Mexico originating with manuscript Lawrence Ville, Pa. Aug 17
(1846) postmark and matching Paid 10, endorsed To the care of the[First mail of Astoria, Oregon] folded letter with integral address leaf addressed to "Sonoma upper California, Mexico" originating with manuscript "Lawrence Ville, Pa. Aug 17" (1846) postmark and matching "Paid 10", endorsed "To the care of the Post Master at Independence, Jackson County, Mo. to be forwarded the first opportunity", it then waited in Independence until the spring of 1847 to be carried up the Oregon Trail to Astoria, Oregon by John Shively, upon arrival in early September it received a manuscript "Astoria, Or" and matching "postage 50 cts" and was forwarded down to Sonoma, light soiling and minor reinforced internal splits, very fine for this; the only letter known from this trip, carried by John M. Shively with his post office appointment and the mails from the east.On March 9, 1847, John M. Shively was officially commissioned to carry the mails and government dispatches to Oregon, and to establish the first U.S. Post Office west of the Rocky Mountains at Astoria, Oregon.The Spectator of Oregon City, under date of Sept. 2, 1847, reported in its columns that an advance company of 16 wagons, under guidance of a Capt. Nat Bowman, was camped within twelve miles of the Dalles, and "we learned that Mr. Shively, who has been in Washington City, was in company with a large quantity of papers and letters for the settlers in Oregon." On Sept. 8th, the Spectator reported that "John M. Shively, Deputy Postmaster at Astoria, had arrived in that city the evening of Sept. 7th."When Shively finally arrived in Astoria, he postmarked the letter "Astoria On," rated it Postage 50 cts," and forwarded it to California. (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $11,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
426 c   [Heading for the Oregon Trail, 1848], folded letter with integral address leaf to Shelby, Ohio with St. Louis, Mo.Apr 18 datestamp and manuscript 20 rate, cover stained,
fine.Excellent long letter on the complex problems of moving a family a[Heading for the Oregon Trail, 1848], folded letter with integral address leaf to Shelby, Ohio with "St. Louis, Mo./Apr 18" datestamp and manuscript "20" rate, cover stained, fine.Excellent long letter on the complex problems of moving a family and property from Ohio to St. Joseph, via St. Louis, including a great account of their steamboat trip up river from St. Louis where the boat got snagged and they had to disembark and continue overland. Exerpt from the letter: "..the cheapest way for emigrants would be to start with nothing but their clothes...Oxen are verry dear now - the demand for the army & Santa fee Trade for the troops now on the Oregon trail and California and Oregon emigrants have taken all the best oxen out of the State..." Forty-one hundred persons travelled over the Oregon Trail in 1848, 1,300 to Oregon and only 400 to California, and 2,400 Mormons to Utah. At the time of this letter the discovery of gold in California had not been generally known. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $425.00
Will close during Public Auction
427 c   [The Emigrant Trail to the Golden West] folded letter with integral address leaf originating with red Granville, OAug 23 (1848) datestamp, addressed to Captain Joseph Tram,
Monterey, California with the directive It is politely requested that[The Emigrant Trail to the Golden West] folded letter with integral address leaf originating with red "Granville, O/Aug 23" (1848) datestamp, addressed to Captain Joseph Tram, Monterey, California with the directive "It is politely requested that the Post Master at Independence Missouri will forward this by the first oportunity / California", the letter apparently laid in the Independence Post Office for ten months until the opportunity to forward arrived on June 21, 1849 as per "Independence, Mo./Jun 21" departure postmark, the postmaster also endorsed it "ford" (forwarded) and rated it "10" from Granville, Ohio and "40" to California making a total rate of 50c collect, then carried overland, light overall soiling as is to be expected, very fine.Of historical note, the writer states: "I receved yours dated March 19, 1848 Monterey. Supose it came by Lieutenant Carson favour to St. Louis." The celebrated Kit Carson, fur trapper, guide and Army Scout, made three trips from California carrying despatches and mail to the east coast - 1846 - 1847 - 1848. Lt. Brewerton, who was with Carson on his last trip, states that the party left Los Angeles May 4th. The St. Louis Reveille gives the date as May 5th when reporting the arrival of Carson in St. Louis on July 31, 1848. (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
428 c   [On the Oregon Trail to the California Gold Fields], folded letter with integral address leaf datelined Nebraska Territory May 26th 1849 to Chillicothe, Illinois, entered the
mails with Fort Leavenworth, Mo.June 14 datestamp and matching X[On the Oregon Trail to the California Gold Fields], folded letter with integral address leaf datelined "Nebraska Territory May 26th 1849" to Chillicothe, Illinois, entered the mails with "Fort Leavenworth, Mo./June 14" datestamp and matching "X" rate handstamp, very fine.In the letter to his wife and children Hugh Moffett writes: "...wee are within Ten miles of fort Kerney formerly called fort Chiles Two hundred and fifty miles from the masourie River - wee have Traveled from fifteen to Twenty miles per day - our Teams is in good elite and wee have eased a grate many teams on the Road and are now Camped within sight of the St Joseph and Independent Road which is perfectly full of Teams - wee hearn yester Day that there was Twenty five Hundred Teams had paced the fort then and wee think there will be Thirty Hundred by the time wee get there tomorowe where wee Intend leaving our letters where they will be Sent to the States - you wil Hear How many Teams will pass this place this Spring for Every Company is Registered and How many men in Each Company and when the Emegrantes are all passed it will be Published … wee mett Some mormons and they Said that they had Some of them bin in the Gold Diggins and had dug one day for an Extry Days work $750 Dollars worth But if they Did not make 100 Dollars per Day they would leave and Hunt another place .. they Shoed us some which had the Gold appearance -I expect you will Here many frightful Storys conserning the Distressis of the calafornia Emagrants - But Believe them not for wee believe wee will get there without any trouble..." (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $900.00
Will close during Public Auction
429   [Maps, Old Fort Kearny] Wonderful pair of hand-drawn maps of the original Fort Kearny, built by Col. Stephen W. Kearny. The first map, about 10 x 8.5, is marked To accompany
Report of Colo: Kearny and Cap: (Nathan) Boone of 25th April 1838. a[Maps, Old Fort Kearny] Wonderful pair of hand-drawn maps of the original Fort Kearny, built by Col. Stephen W. Kearny. The first map, about 10" x 8.5", is marked "To accompany Report of Colo: Kearny and Cap: (Nathan) Boone of 25th April 1838." and shows the fort not far to the north of Table Creek, and some distance south of McPherson's Trading house on the Missouri River, just across from the State of Missouri, in Indian Territory (that would later become Nebraska). Most interestingly, it shows an old northern border of Missouri that would later be challenged successfully by Iowa. Thus, the site now lies across from Iowa, not Missouri. Captain Boone was the son of Daniel Boone. Backed with linen for preservation. The second map, 9.8" x 10.5", drawn in 1855, is in color and shows detail of the timber reserve across the river from the fort. The earlier map delineates this with a simple line, but the present map has the area divided into townships and ranges, now an important detail since the area has become a destination for emigrants. By this time, the fort was beginning to fall into disuse, and a new Fort Kearny would be built on the Platte River in the middle of Nebraska. The present city of Kearney has grown up near that site. Old Fort Kearny was near today's Nebraska City. Both maps are in outstanding condition. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $800.00
Will close during Public Auction
430 c   [Recommendation for naming Fort Kearney] May 1st, 1846 folded letter with integral address leaf datelined at Saint Joseph to Washington, D.C., entered the mails with Fort
Leavenworth Mo.May 19 datestamp and manuscript On public service endor[Recommendation for naming Fort Kearney] May 1st, 1846 folded letter with integral address leaf datelined at Saint Joseph to Washington, D.C., entered the mails with "Fort Leavenworth Mo./May 19" datestamp and manuscript "On public service" endorsement, fresh and very fine.Brigadier General George M Brooke writes Brigadier General Roger Jones: "...I respectfully suggest, that the new post, may be called, Fort Kearney in Honor of the gallant Colonel, who, has the construction of it. His name, among the Indians, on this Frontier, is a Honor in itself; and I know of no officer in the Army who Deserves, more justly, this small mark, of Honor and respect." (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $450.00
Will close during Public Auction
431 c   [Fort Leavenworth, Fort Kearney and Grand Island, Nebraska Territory], fascinating correspondence of William W. Ingraham to his brother Edward in Kicapoo, Illinois of eight
stampless folded letters with integral address leaves (transcibed) from F[Fort Leavenworth, Fort Kearney and Grand Island, Nebraska Territory], fascinating correspondence of William W. Ingraham to his brother Edward in Kicapoo, Illinois of eight stampless folded letters with integral address leaves (transcibed) from Fort Leavenworth 28 July, 1847, Fort Kearney between 13 November, 1847 and 14 April, 1848 (four letters, three with manuscript High Creek postmarks) and Grand Island from 5 June, 1848 to 12 July, 1848 (three letters with High Creek or Savannah manuscript postmarks), all with manuscript 10c rates, some soiling and staining, very fine correspondence.Ingraham joined a company called the Subblette Rangers and these eight very descriptive and often amusing letters give an insightful account of his experiences while stationed in Nebraska Territory during the Mexican War. Excerpts include: July 28th, 1847 "…Dear Brother This the first opportunity I have had since I left home of writing. I am now on my way to the rocky mountains to kill indians and hunt buffaloe. I took five dollars from the store when I started and took passage at Peoria for St. Louis - while going down the river I saw a steamboat burst and a woman & child fall over board. At St Louis I walked around a while with Howard a young man that came with me - the city was full of companies of horse and foot volunteeres (soldiers) either for Oregon, Mexico city, Santa Fe, California or Chihuahua (pronounced Cheewawa). Howard and I joined a company called the Subblette Rangers - we have twenty eight dollars a month and out of our first six months pay a hundred and twenty dollars are deducted to pay for our horse and their saddles and bridles and our clothing - we have been marching for eighteen days through dust so thick that you could not see the third man that rode a head of you. Sometimes we would have to ride thirty miles before we could find any water for our horses or ourselves, we will start in a few days from the Fort to occupy a station somewhere in the mountains…when the war with Mexico (is over) I am coming back again, when discharged at the end of the war I am entitled to a hundred and sixty acres of land - I think I will take it somewhere in Oregon. I shall not be able to write home more or rather send a letter home more than once a year but when ever I get a chance I will be sure and give you a description of the country. here at the Fort the indians come into camp every day with moccosins and ponies to sell - Some of the ponies are not more than three feet and a half high…William W. Ingraham Postmarked: FORT LEAVENWORTH July 29.Nov. 13th, 1847 "…Fort Kearney Nov. l3th 1847 I have another opportunity to write to you for the first time since I left Leavenworth. The next place that we stopped at after we left the Fort was Iowa Point we stayed there for a week and I went to the church at the missions and heard the missionary preach to the indians in their own language, and deliver an address to the volenteers. While we were there an old Indian died, and I went to the funeral. I never heard such a howling in all my life - they put him in his grave in a sitting position and put his bow and arrows and his spear in his hands, and those nearest the grave cut themselves with their knives and smeared the blood on a bunch of turkey feathers and tied it on a pole with a white rag. from there we marched to Fort Kearney, it was nothing but a solitary block house, but now we have built our winter quarters it has quite respectable appearance, our quarters are built of logs and covered with sod and dirt, with sod chimneys. About a week after we reached the fort thirty of our company were detailed to assist the quartermasters men in putting a bridge over the Nimahaw (river) for the purpose of bringing over the stores, while were gone about five or six hundred indians came down across the prarie much to the alarm of those remaining in the camp some of the bravest men saddled their horses end prepared for flight others more desperate loaded their rifles and got behind a pile of flour sacks and prepared to recieve them, but it happened to be a tribe of Otos driven down by the Sous coming to the fort for protection, they were attacked by the Sous while their warriors were on a hunt and there were but sixty effecient men in the village - some of their chiefs came up to our camp and had a long talk with the captain - they said that the Sous charged into their village on horseback and their warriors could scarcely keep them at bay while their women swam the Platte river with their children - many of the children were drownded in the river while they were tied to their mothers. they told of (a) young squaw that was surrounded in a wigwam - she killed several of the enemy before she was taken, which (was) done by setting fire to the house. The indians while they were at the fort raised such a yelling that we could hear them for five miles. Our company was ordered to go as a guard for the surveyor to Grand Island for the purpose of selecting a situation for another fort. our horses had to live on nothing but grass. the first day a horse gave out and he was just turned loose on the prarie until we came back, the second day we came to Salt creek and the next we came to a lake - at the head of it, the lake was dry and the bottom of it was covered with a crust of salt a quarter of an inch thick, the second day after that we were met by a small party of indians a going to Santa Fe to steal horses - each of them had a laraette rope hanging in his belt, that night some more of them came into our camp, the captain made them a present of some cartridges, but they refused them because it was not enough, they pretended to be very angry and threatened us to bring down their warriors. the captain acted very coolly and issued some more ammunition to his men. So the red rascals thought proper to cool down a little, the next night two or three came in the camp to steal horses and were fired upon by the guard. We had a grand time hunting buffaloe - I had the (luck) of killing several. I should have killed more but I did not wish to injure my horse, more than a hundred (were) shot and left untouched on the field. We came down through Pawnee village and there we saw from fifteen hundred to two thousand little young indians, each with his bow and arrows and laraette. I saw a little Indian not bigger than Dunk throw his laraette over the neck of a pony at full gallop. There is a rumour that we will be discharged in the spring, but I do not believe it is true…When you write direct your letters to "High Creek, Atchinson County, Missouri. Oregon Battalion. Company A. For the Army." I wish you would send me a piper now and then. I would like to know what is going on in the world. I feel the want of books very much. Tell Dunk the game is so thick at Grand Island that we were never out of sight of it, there were buffaloe, antilope, Elk, deer, wolves, hares, and whole acres of prarie dogs, the dogs live in the same holes with owls and rattlesnakes. We surrounded some deer one day and fore of them jumped over the mules in the wagon and nearly knocked the driver off....I must stop writing now for two reasons, one is that I cant think of anything or to say the other is another man wants the pen & ink.” Postmarked: FORT LEAVENWORTH MO Nov 23Jan 22nd 1848 Fort Kearney.”…I have recieved three papers and an almanac which were very acceptable to me as well as the whole company for I assure you they went the rounds....we are now very busy preparing another trip to the west, company A & C will be sent to fort Laramy (excuse me if I spell it wrong for I have no map) at the foot of the mountains, the others poor fellows will have to build another block house and winter quarters at Grand Island. You ask for a description of Fort Kearney. It lies two miles west of the western line of Iowa on the west side of Table Creek about sixty miles from the Little Nemahaw (Nemaha River). All the south and west side is one continued prarie twenty and somtimes thirty miles between the watering places, no timber except in the hollows where there is water, on the north side of the Fort is the Missouri river on each side of which and on an Island in the middle there is plenty of timber abounding in game of all kinds - I never go in the woods but lam nearly deafened with the screeching of paroquets and croaking of ravens. On the other side of the river are numerous shantees - grog shops an grocery stores on a small scale, got up since the battalion arrived, as you go down the river there is a vast bottom covered with grass tall enough to hide a man on horseback, extending six miles from the river, beyond which are emmense cliffs of sand that have the appearance as cliffs of rock (sandstone). they are two or three hundred feet high and make a very splended appearance, you must excuse me for making so many mistakes for there is two men practising on the fiddle in the house and make such a din that I can not hear myself speak. on the south side of the river towards the north the bluffs are nearer the river, the north side of river up.” Jan 22nd, 1848 "…Two or three Mexicans have been here to see us from California. They had on hats with crowns a foot high…" March 18th, 1848 "…the quarter master refused the troops lumber for their quarters and sold it to the Mormons that moved into camp…the adjutant announced to us the death of John Quincy Adams made a semipathetic speach, and the artillary fired twenty four guns. The orders from Washington were to haul the flag half was down the staff, but as we have not an American flag in the garrison that cerimony was omitted…" April 14th, 1848 "…there is news from Chihuahua that a Mexican general was marching to Santa Fee with 1500 men, and there was only two two companies of dragoons in the place to protect it…" There are also description of Sioux attacks on the Pawnee, hunting buffalo, getting lost or stranded on the Prairie and the antics of fellow soldiers on payday. (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $4,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
432 c   [Fort Kearney, Oregon Trail] folded letter with integral address leaf datelined Fort Kearney March 31st 48 and carried out of the mails to Senicaville, Ohio, very fine.James C.
Lourey writes his sister: …I am a volunteer in Capt Stuards (Stu[Fort Kearney, Oregon Trail] folded letter with integral address leaf datelined "Fort Kearney March 31st 48" and carried out of the mails to Senicaville, Ohio, very fine.James C. Lourey writes his sister: "…I am a volunteer in Capt Stuards (Stuarts) Co, in the Oregon Batalian. This Batalian was got up on purpose to Build Forts on the Oregon rout for the safety of the emagrants as the Pawnee Indians has for some years Been in the habit of robing the emagrants - But this Batallian Inlisted during the Mexican war And from the signs of the times at present it is thought that we will not leave this place until we are disbanded - our wages amounts to about twenty two or three dollar per month - we are allowed eight dollars our selves and we are allowed twelve for our horses and forage found and at sutch times as forage can not be had our horses draws sixteen per month - Besides we are allowed three dollars per month extra for clotheing - The pay Master was up about a couple of weeks ago and paid us up to the first of March…We reached this place about the middle of September and out of over six hundred men there has been only four deaths and one of them caused by accident. Now I will give you a brief account of a trip that we had up the river last fall some two hundred and fifty miles above here - There had been some three or four fir traders murdered and robed by some of the Scioux Indians - Colonel received an order to send three hundred men to the Scioux village and take those murderers and provided they would not give them up the order was to take the Chiefs them selves - So we left here about middle of October with two heavy pieces of artilery - we got along tolerably fair for some four or five days until we got above the great Morman Camp or the high Camp of Israel as they call it - above there the Prairie was principally all Burnt off so it was only occasiomally that we could find grass and as we was above the white settlment there was no corn or oats to be had - So the Artilery horses and the mewls whitch balled the provision wagons soon began to fail - So we had to travil slow and cut down Gotten wood trees for our horses to feed - But after we Crossed little Scioux river the way we had plenty of game was a sight - The averag nomber of deer killed and wounded from there to Fort Vermillion (fur trade post) was from twenty five to thirty per day besides a considerable nomber of Badgers wild Turkeys and some Elk and Antilope - And we saw four Buffalo at a distance - we was just comeing into the Buffalo range - Now I must leave of the game subject and proced to give you an account of the Scioux War. After fifteen days march we came in Sight of fort Vermillion So there was given for every man to have his Musket and Pistles well loaded - So we Marched in with as mutch Splendor as circumstances would admit of - And so when we got there, wat should we find but four or five old French men and three or four old lame Squaws. Thus ended the Scioux war or the Badger hunt as it is stiled. So we marched back and reached this place about the middle of Nov. We have the easyest kind of times. When you write direct your letter to Fort Kearney High Creek Atchison Co. Mo....James C. Lourey"Fort Vermillion was located near Vermillion, South Dakota just below the mouth of the Vermillion river on the Missouri. Old Fort Kearny did not have a post office. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $2,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
433 c   Fort Kearny, Oregon Route, manuscript military postmark, as unorganized Territory, on folded letter with integral address leaf datelined On the plains May 21st 1848 and carried
by military express to Fort Leavenworth where it entered the mailsFort Kearny, Oregon Route, manuscript military postmark, as unorganized Territory, on folded letter with integral address leaf datelined "On the plains May 21st 1848" and carried by military express to Fort Leavenworth where it entered the mails to Lewiston, Illinois with "Fort Leavenworth, Mo./June 14" datestamp struck over the military marking and matching "X" rate, extremely fine; the only reported example of this military marking. The Post Office Department did not establish a Post Office at the fort until 7 July, 1849.This letter was written by a California bound emigrant, J. Emery, who dated it "On the Plains May 21st 1848". He states that he is camped 20 miles from Fort Childs. The following is from the letter: "I have an opportunity to use the influence of our Captain (who was an officer at this post last year) to get a letter conveyed…there are so many persons wishing to send letters' that it would be impossible for the Quartermaster to get them all in the mail." His comments on the emigration are also worth noting: "There is a large number of persons going - all rushing ahead - some one way & some another - some of their teams & waggons already giving out & breaking down & the road is strewn with broken waggons - trunks - boxes - bacon - lead - powder - sugar - coffee & in fact everything which people in their mad zeal throw out…some are turning back…There is certain to be a great amount of suffering in the mountains…We have in our train thirty waggons & about ninety men."Fort Kearny, Missouri Country. There were two Fort Kearnys in what is now the State of Nebraska. The first was located a few miles, south of Nebraska City at the confluence of Table Creek and the Missouri River. It was abandoned in the spring of 1848, less than a year after it was founded, for a more favorable site at the head of Grand Island in the Platte River. Troops, under the command of Col. L.E. Powell, began the construction and named it Fort Childs. On Dec. 30, 1848 the name was officially changed to Fort Kearny. (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $6,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
434 c   [Fort Kearny tarder] folded letter with integral address leaf datelined at "Fort Kearny (Unorganized Nebraska Territory) June 22, 1849" that was carried east by a private party and placed in the mails with manuscript "High Creek, Mo./July 5" postmark and matching "5" rate for under 300 miles to Liberty, Missouri, fresh and very fine. Also includes 29 August, 1849 steamboat illustrated invoice for goods shipped by Major Dougherty from Fort Leavenworth to his son at Fort Kearny, presumably in response to this letter.L.B. Dougherty, the sutler at Fort Kearny, writes to his father, Major John Dougherty, about the trade and affairs at the fort on June 22, 1849: "I enclose you a list of articles needed in the store, now very much. Tinware princibly. We have sold all out…But I think all the Emigrants have passed. So I suppose we will have nothing to do now but to wait on the government trains, which will be passing through all summer and perhaps there will be a good many returning from California towards the later end of summer. If we could but know wether there would be as great an emigration next year as there has been this or not, we could make our cash sales 5 times as great, by having the goods out here in time for them, but this is a considerable risk to run…Bennet got in yestarday and told me of your arrival, and also of the robbery of the Hughes party, surely from his account a very green affair from his story they were carelled and able to keep the Indians off. We have been visited since you left by a party of Shiens (Cheyenne Indians) about 150 - I bought one of their horses for $12 and sold it for $25 in two days after I bought…" Est. $500-750

SOLD for $625.00
Will close during Public Auction
435 c   [Oregon Trail en route to the California gold fields] good letter datelined Camp No. 43 - 135 miles above Fort Kearny on the South Fork of the Platte, May 22nd 1850 in which
the writer describes the overland route from Independence, following a[Oregon Trail en route to the California gold fields] good letter datelined "Camp No. 43 - 135 miles above Fort Kearny on the South Fork of the Platte, May 22nd 1850" in which the writer describes the overland route from Independence, following along the Kansas River to the mouth of the Big Blue River, thence northwest to the junction with the Little Blue River, then northwest to Grand Island and Fort Kearny on the Platte River, and then due west along the Platte to a point 125 miles from Fort Kearny on the fork of the South Platte near its for with the North Platte. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $550.00
Will close during Public Auction
436 c   [Fort Kearny Oregon Route] light but readable ornate Ft Kearny O.R. handstamp with spread eagle, stars and leaves in blue with matching Paid and 5 rate and manuscript June 552
added to the postmark on folded letter with integral address[Fort Kearny Oregon Route] light but readable ornate "Ft Kearny O.R." handstamp with spread eagle, stars and leaves in blue with matching "Paid" and "5" rate and manuscript "June 5/52" added to the postmark on folded letter with integral address leaf to Woodbridge, Iowa datelined "Fort Carny indian territory June the 4 1852", cover stained and edges silked, good; one of only four reported examples of this postmark.Letter written by John Johnston to his wife while on his way to California reads in part: "…we are 250 miles from the Bloofs - our cattle are better now than when we started - we had no troble withe the indians yet. Peter Dilts has had very bad luck on the 23 night of May he had 3 head of his best oxon stolin by the indians the indians had 8 or 10 miles the start - 8 of the men folowed until 2 oclock and found the Catle Dead and skined...we have just came to the St Jo rode - the rode is just lined with teams - there has been a few cases of colerea…there is not one man in this company if he had not started he would not…" (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $450.00
Will close during Public Auction
437 c   [Fort Kearny Oregon Route] ornate Ft Kearny O.R. handstamp with spread eagle, stars and leaves tying 3c Dull red (11, faults) to buff cover to Parsippany, N.J., with second
stronger strike repeated at lower left, original letter enclosure, cov[Fort Kearny Oregon Route] ornate "Ft Kearny O.R." handstamp with spread eagle, stars and leaves tying 3c Dull red (#11, faults) to buff cover to Parsippany, N.J., with second stronger strike repeated at lower left, original letter enclosure, cover with light horizontal creasing at top, fine; one of only four reported examples of the Fort Kearny Oregon Route postmark, this being the only example in black.Cover contains a letter datelined "Fort Kearney June 15th/52" in which Edgar G. Smith writes to his parents: "...We see some Indians, plenty of adventure and a good deal to amusement - We have joined a party of two waggons from New York state, six men and two ladies, they have cows...I will write you at length from Fort Laramie about the fourth of July..."The Fort Kearny, O.R. (Oregon Route) Post Office was established July 7, 1849 in what the Post Office Department called for county location "Indian Country". This was the second Fort Kearny built in unorganized territory. It was first named Fort Childs but on December 30, 1848 it was changed to Fort Kearny after Brig. Genl. Stephen Watts Kearny. It was located near the head of Grand Island, on the south side of the Platte River about eight miles S.E. of Kearney, Neb. Like forts Laramie and Bridger it was a way station on the Oregon & California roads in the westward tide of empire. On May 17, 1871 it was abandoned by the military and on April 14, 1873 the post office, which was located in the fort was discontinued. The Type I postmark shown above was spelled correctly but Types II, III and IV were changed to "Kearney" to conform with the present city of Kearney. The first postmaster was Lewis B. Dougherty, the sutler at the fort, and in one of his letters he datelined it "Fort Kearny O.R./Clackemas Co." and in another letter "Fort Kearny O.R.N.T. In the 1851 “Table of Post Offices”, it is listed as "Indian Country, Nebraska". From this and other evidence it has been determined that "O.R." stands for Oregon Route. (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $11,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
438 c   [On the Oregon Trail] folded letter with integral address leaf datelined Platte River, near Fort Kearny, May 9th, 1849 carried out of the mails to Kanesville, Iowa, where it
entered the mails with manuscript Kanesville IoaJune 13, 1849 postm[On the Oregon Trail] folded letter with integral address leaf datelined "Platte River, near Fort Kearny, May 9th, 1849" carried out of the mails to Kanesville, Iowa, where it entered the mails with manuscript "Kanesville Ioa/June 13, 1849" postmark and matching "10" rate, cover soiled and stained.Fred Snyder writes to his brother: "I have just time to inform you that we have travelled about 310 miles from St. Joseph and 800 from St. Louis and are now encamped upon the Platte River between Fort Kearney and Fort Laramie - We are now within 16 days travel from the latter fort - Game is abundant but the grass is poor - I shall take every oppertunity to write to you but I have not heard a word from home since I left nor do I expect to until my arrival in California - Do not forget to direct letters for me to San Francisco by the way of Chagres, Panama. We meet Indians every day and are now in the Paunee country, - by tomorrow we shall be among the Sioux - Nicholas Boismenue of Cahokia accidently shot himself a few days ago and died immediately - He was buried on the Big Blue River…" (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $550.00
Will close during Public Auction
439   [Fort Laramie] Very early autograph letter from a member of the Delaware Company, signed by A.C. Moses from Ft. Laramie, May 28, 1849. He writes to his brother Marsh: At the
Missouri river we had rigged up a set of harness for each waggon and[Fort Laramie] Very early autograph letter from a member of the Delaware Company, signed by A.C. Moses from Ft. Laramie, May 28, 1849. He writes to his brother Marsh: "At the Missouri river we had rigged up a set of harness for each waggon and had driven six horses untill the day we reached the Platte…About a mile the other side of the ford we met the first Sioux...We were surrounded by them. They are fine set of men most of them six feet in highth. They are friendly enough…By thunder I thought they would hug me to death…We made the chief a present of about a bushel of corn. They are the greatest lot of beggars ever I went any where. My red Coat took I had more than a hundred offers for it…I was after a pony but could not wring in for want of time…Several of the boys traded worne out coats for (buffalo) robes…There was about fifty Squaws come up. Among them I noticed about a dozen very good looking ones and a couple of positively handsome ones."The Delaware Company was among the first wave of emigration in 1849, and had started for California on April 2. We have not seen any letters written earlier in the season this far west. Typically letters stopped arriving not long after this point, for emigrants were too busy rushing to get over the Rockies and Sierra Nevada before the snows came. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
440 c   [Fort Laramie, Oregon Route] folded letter with integral address leaf with light strike of Ft. Laramie, O.R. (Oregon Route) Ty. I handstamp with manuscript Nov 15 date struck
over manuscript Ft LaramieNov 1551 manuscript postmark, with mat[Fort Laramie, Oregon Route] folded letter with integral address leaf with light strike of "Ft. Laramie, O.R." (Oregon Route) Ty. I handstamp with manuscript "Nov 15" date struck over manuscript "Ft Laramie/Nov 15/51 manuscript postmark, with matching "J.S. Tutt P.M./Free" to Major Dougherty at Liberty, Missouri, very fine.In the letter Tutt writes to his partner about the business affairs at the post: "I have sold to the traders $6000.00 of goods at 25% on cost & 10 cents per pound on freight ... I think we may have some military in Mormon line next year - If so and you are willing (if we see no hopes for this post) we will sell and quit...The officers, Parson & men are well...The winter, with its windy and driving wet snows has just set in...Johnson is going down [to Saint Louis] on the 15th with the Salt Lake mail...There are plenty of Indians in 2 days; but they will not make many robes. Lots of traders this year - our robes brought 2.85 & beaver 2.50..." Kit Carson and William Bent from Bent's Fort on the Arkansas had been there and traded with Tutt the year before.The Fort Laramie Post Office was established on March 14, 1850 in what was then unorganized territory. The Post Office Department had attached it to Clackamas County, Oregon, apparently, for administrative reasons. Its first postmaster was John S. Tutt the sutler at the fort and a partner of John Dougherty the sutler and Indian agent at Fort Leavenworth. On May 30, 1854 Fort Laramie became part of the newly formed territory of Nebraska. Thence was successively in Idaho Territory from March 3, 1863 to May 26, 1864; Dakota Territory from May 27, 1864 to July 29, 1868; Wyoming Territory from July 30, 1868 to July 10, 1890 and finally in the State of Wyoming to the present day. It is Wyoming's first post office located in Goshen County. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $850.00
Will close during Public Auction

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