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Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. Sale: 1211

United States
1847 Issue to and from British North America

Sale No: 1211
Lot No: 145
Symbol: C
Cat No: 2

image The earliest post-demonetization use of the 1847 Issue from Canada

10¢ Black (2), three large margins, ample to just in at upper right, crisp impression, small scuff at top left, tied by red "Montreal L.C. JY 28, 1851" circular datestamp on blue folded cover from Montreal, Canada to New York City, from the D. S. Kennedy correspondence, demonetized use accepted as fully paid in Canada and New York, originally treated as unpaid with "6d" in circle handstamp applied in Montreal, this was struck out by a Canadian 7-ring target cancel, red "CANADA" in arc handstamp applied as required by postal agreement, red "PAID" arc handstamp applied in New York indicates this was considered fully prepaid

Very Fine cover; one vertical file fold passes through 10¢ stamp, but is not disfiguring. An extremely rare demonetized use of the 1847 Issue on a cover to New York City, originating in Montreal, Canada, on July 28, 1851. Only six or seven demonetized covers with the 1847 Issue are known from Canada, and of these only four are from Montreal. The USPCS census no. 282 is a cover dated 7/29/1851, but without a photo or corroboration it seems very likely the entry is based on this cover, listed as no. 281.

The 1847 Issue was demonetized on July 1, 1851. Supplies of the 1847 Issue sent to Canada could be redeemed through September 30, 1851; however, not all stamps were redeemed, and some were used after demonetization. Although no longer valid on mail posted within the United States, the stamps on mail from Canada to the U.S. were accepted--the latest use is on April 6, 1853. According to Creighton C. Hart, the demonetization order was "not binding on residents of Canada," which appears to be empirically true (Chronicle 80, where this cover is photographed). The addressee, D. S. Kennedy, was the Canadian government's fiscal agent in the United States, another reason to accept the stamp, even though it would have deprived Canada of revenue since the payment in U.S. stamps meant the U.S. kept all postage.

Ex John D. Pope III, Dr. John L. Robertson and Joseph Hackmey. Described in Stanley B. Ashbrook, Special Service, #68, p. 551, photo 272. Illustrated in Bakers' U.S. Classics (p. 181). (Image)

E. $ 7,500-10,000

Openings not Provided
Sold...US$ 8,500.00


Closed..Oct-29-2019, 14:40:08 EST
Sold For 8500

Sale No: 1211
Lot No: 146
Symbol: C
Cat No: 1

image The famous Canada and United States First Issues mixed-franking cover with a 1851 3p "Beaver" and single 5¢ 1847 Issue, both cancelled in Montreal, Canada-- one of the most desirable covers in all of classic worldwide philately

DESCRIPTION

5¢ Red Brown (1), three ample margins, clear to just slightly in at left, late impression, used with Canada, 1851, 3p Red on Laid (1), large even margins, bright color, both stamps tied by bold strikes of Canadian 7-ring target cancel, red "Montreal L.C. JU 8, 1851" circular datestamp, red "CANADA" in framed arc cross-border handstamp on blue folded letter from Montreal, Canada, to New York City, from the D. S. Kennedy correspondence, datelined "Montreal, June 7th 1851", sender's notation "p. paid" at top right, red "PAID" arc handstamp applied in New York ties both stamps and confirms that the 5¢ stamp affixed in Canada was accepted as full prepayment

PROVENANCE

Alfred F. Lichtenstein and Louise Boyd Dale, H. R. Harmer, Sale 10, 12/7-8/1970, lot 16, to Hillmer

Duane Hillmer (sold privately to Grunin)

Louis Grunin (sold privately to Garrett)

Duane B. Garrett (collection sold privately to Dr. Kapiloff)

Dr. Leonard Kapiloff, Siegel Auction Galleries, 6/9/1992, Sale 743, lot 121, to Craveri

Guido Craveri, Bennett sale, 3/23/2002, lot 47

Acquired by William H. Gross in a private transaction

CENSUS, LITERATURE AND EXHIBITION REFERENCES

USPCS census no. 261 https://www.uspcs.org/resource-center/censuses/1847-cover-census/

Winthrop S. Boggs, The Postage Stamps and Postal History of Canada, p. 79, fig. 36

Creighton C. Hart, "1847 Cross-Border Covers," Chronicle 98, p. 96, fig. 3

INTERPHIL 1976 (Hillmer)

Special Exhibition of Greatest Covers from the Collections of Alfred F. Lichtenstein and Louise Boyd Dale, published by The Philatelic Foundation, 1995

CERTIFICATION

The Philatelic Foundation (1992)

CONDITION NOTES

Extremely Fine; faint vertical file fold affects 3p stamp

HISTORY AND COMMENTARY

One Beaver, One Benjamin--Both Cancelled in Canada

The events that created the Beaver cover start on April 6, 1851, when a new postal treaty between Canada and the United States went into effect. For decades there had been no easy way to pay postage on letters between the two adjoining North American nations. Postage on each side was calculated based on distance to the border, and letters would be delivered marked postage due for the receiving country's share. The 1851 postal treaty created a reciprocal postage rate--6 pence in Canada and 10 cents in the U.S.--without any need for cumbersome postage collection. The new agreement went into effect on April 6, 1851.

On April 23, 1851, Canada's first issue of postage stamps became available. The 3-pence stamp was an orange-red, rectangular design depicting a semi-aquatic rodent, whose lustrous fur, when removed and turned into hats, had made it a vital part of Canada's economic history and a symbol of the British North American colony--the beaver. The Beaver stamp paid the 3p domestic rate in Canada.

At the same time in the United States, Congress had established lower postage rates and authorized new stamps to pay them, set for release on July 1, 1851. On that day the old 1847 Issue would no longer be valid for postage, and a three-month redemption period would commence. For years before, the 1847 stamps had been supplied to Canadian post offices and used there to prepay the U.S. postage on letters addressed to the states. After the 1851 U.S.-Canada postal treaty took effect, Canadian postmasters accepted the U.S. stamps in payment of the Canada 6-pence rate (roughly equivalent to 10¢ U.S.), even after the 1847s were demonetized in the their own country of origin.

The time between the release date of Canada's first issue and the last day the 1847 Issue was valid for postage in the U.S. is 69 days. During this brief period, the first issues of both countries, printed by the same firm--Rawdon, Wright, Hatch & Edson--could be used on the same letter, but only under very unusual circumstances, which technically skirted the rules of the new treaty, but were nonetheless practiced and accepted by post offices on both sides.

This cover with a single Canada 3p Beaver and 5¢ 1847 was highlighted in Sale 10 of the Dale-Lichtenstein collection (H. R. Harmer, 12/7-8/1970) and realized $9,000, the second highest price of the auction, exceeded only by the mint corner pair of the Canada 1851 12p Black. It became part of the Duane Hillmer collection of Canada and then passed to Louis Grunin when the Hillmer collection was sold privately. Grunin's 1847s were acquired by Duane Garrett, and then the entire Garrett collection was bought by Dr. Leonard Kapiloff. At the Kapiloff sale in 1992, Guido Craveri bought the Beaver cover, and it was later sold to Mr. Gross. (Image)

E. $ 300,000-400,000

Openings not Provided
Sold...US$ 300,000.00


Closed..Oct-29-2019, 14:41:52 EST
Sold For 300000
Sale No: 1211
Lot No: 147
Symbol: C
Cat No: 1

image One of the three recorded Canada and United States First Issues mixed-franking covers--this is the only cover sent from the United States to Canada

DESCRIPTION

5¢ Red Brown (1), large margins to clear, bright shade, used with Canada, 1851, 3p Red on Laid (1), large margins to just clear where bottom right corner clipped, used on folded letter from the United States to Canada, datelined "Scottsville May 3 1851" and addressed to Thomas R. Merritt at St. Catharines, red grid cancel struck twice--one tying 5¢ and other cancelling 3p at origin--matching red "Rochester N.Y. May 4" (1851) circular datestamp, red "U. STATES" in arc handstamp (Type A-2, probably applied at Lewiston, New York), black "Queenston U.C. May 6, 1851" circular datestamp also ties 5¢ stamp, no due markings which indicates the 3p Beaver stamp was accepted at the U.S. origin and Canadian receiving post offices, receipt docketing "Scofield & Co., May 3d 1851"

PROVENANCE

Hermann Wollenberger (given to grandson, Robert Friend), Ashbrook index card files

J. M. Bartels "Rarity" sale, 4/27/1940, lot 7

Barrett G. Hindes, H. R. Harmer sale, 1/23/1968, lot 22

Dr. John L. Robertson, Bennett sale, 9/23/2004, lot 138, to Hackmey

Joseph Hackmey (collection sold privately to William H. Gross, 2010)

CENSUS, LITERATURE AND EXHIBITION REFERENCES

USPCS census no. 9024 https://www.uspcs.org/resource-center/censuses/1847-cover-census/

Winthrop S. Boggs, The Postage Stamps and Postal History of Canada, p. 77, fig. 34

Lester G. Brookman, United States Postage Stamps of the 19th Century, Vol. I, p. 24, fig. 21

Ed Richardson, "Philatelic Byways Thru 19th Century B.N.A. Victorian Canada," The Stamp Specialist, 1944 Maroon Book, p. 78

CERTIFICATION

The Philatelic Foundation (1959 and 2004)

CONDITION NOTES

Very Fine; 3p light soiling and small crease, cover with faint waterstains (the latter not noted on certificate)

Signed by Stanley B. Ashbrook with note "after a very careful examination it is my opinion that this rare cover is absolutely genuine" (September 15, 1944)

HISTORY AND COMMENTARY

The Unique Beaver Cover to Canada

As explained in the History and Commentary section of the previous lot description, the 1851 postal treaty created a reciprocal postage rate--6 pence in Canada and 10 cents in the U.S.--without any need for cumbersome postage collection. The new agreement went into effect on April 6, 1851. On April 23, 1851, Canada's first issue of postage stamps became available. The 3-pence stamp was an orange-red, rectangular design depicting a beaver--it is familiarly known to stamp collectors as the Beaver.

The time between the release date of Canada's first issue and the last day the 1847 Issue was valid for postage in the U.S. is 69 days. During this brief period, the first issues of both countries, printed by the same firm--Rawdon, Wright, Hatch & Edson--could be used on the same letter, but only under very unusual circumstances, which technically skirted the rules of the new treaty, but were nonetheless practiced and accepted by post offices on both sides.

Three covers and two pieces are recorded with mixed frankings of Canada 3p Beaver and 1847 Issue stamps (all 5¢). Two of the covers and both pieces originated in Canada. The Beaver and single 5¢ cover is addressed to New York City (offered in lot 146), and both stamps were cancelled in Canada. The other cover from Canada is addressed to England and has a strip of 5¢ stamps, which was not cancelled until the cover reached New York City. The cover offered here was mailed in the opposite direction, from Scottsville, New York, to Canada. Scottsville is located near Rochester, where it was postmarked. It traveled about 90 miles west to Lewiston, New York, an exchange office for cross-border mail, and was carried another 10 miles to St. Catharines, Canada.

Stanley B. Ashbrook made note of this cover after it first appeared in one of the J. M. Bartels "Rarity" sales, held on April 27, 1940. Ashbrook's index card notes state that the original owner was Hermann Wollenberger, a Chicago resident, who informed Ashbrook on December 12, 1942, that he had given the cover to his grandson, Robert Friend. The cover later appeared in the 1968 Barrett G. Hindes sale held by H. R. Harmer. It may have been acquired in that sale by Dr. John L. Robertson. When the Robertson collection was sold by Bennett in 2004, it was bought by Joseph Hackmey. The entire Hackmey collection was acquired by William H. Gross in 2010. With the acquisition of the Hackmey collection, Mr. Gross became the first collector to own all three 1847/Beaver mixed-franking covers. (Image)

E. $ 75,000-100,000

Openings not Provided
Sold...US$ 67,500.00


Closed..Oct-29-2019, 14:43:09 EST
Sold For 67500

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