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2020 Rarities of the World continued...

Hawaii
Lot Sym. Lot Description  
281 c ImageFORWARDED VIA PANAMA,/BY BUSH & CO.,/ LAHAINA. Beautifully clear strike of truncated box handstamp in red on March 10, 1850 datelined folded letter from Frederick A. Weld, captain of the whaling ship Italy of Greenport Long Island, written during a stop at Maui and addressed to his brother in Guilford Conn., includes a discussion of collecting 60 barrels of sperm whale oil and time in the Marquesas Islands, "San Francisco 40 15 May" 40c transcontinental rate circular datestamp in red, also clear strike of red "PER STR. ISTHMUS" straightline, absolutely fresh and choice condition

EXTREMELY FINE. FROM A NEW FIND, THIS IS THE FINEST CONDITION COVER OF ONLY THREE BEARING THE RARE BUSH & COMPANY, LAHAINA, "FORWARDED BY PANAMA" HANDSTAMP. AN EXCEPTIONAL HAWAII FORWARDER COVER FROM A WHALING SHIP CAPTAIN SOJOURNING AT MAUI.

All of the Hawaii forwarder markings from this period are scarce to rare. The Gregory census in Hawaii Foreign Mail to 1870 (Appendix III-C, No. 7) records only two examples of this Bush & Co. marking (there are also two others of a different and less desirable style, lacking the word "Panama"). This example becomes the third. They are as follows, listed chronologically:

1) Struck on front of March 10, 1850 folded letter to Guilford Conn., San Francisco May 15 and "PER STR. ISTHMUS" straightline, Extremely Fine condition, the cover offered here

2) Struck on front of March 27, 1850 folded letter to Lewiston Falls Maine, with the same markings and carried on same ships as the example offered here, some internal erosion and edge toning and wear, ex Ostheimer, Honolulu Advertiser (Siegel Sale 769, lot 2094, realized $9,500) and Peters

3) Struck on flap of July 1851 envelope addressed to Harrisburg Pa., forwarded to New Haven Conn, some erosion and age toning, ex Ishikawa (Sotheby Parke Bernet, 11/18/1980, lot 47)

Bush & Co. was formed in 1850 and dissolved in 1851 after Alfred Bush passed away. This Bush forwarder cover, along with the #2 cover listed above was picked up at Lahaina by the American bark Russell, which departed Honolulu on March 29. The letters from the Russell were transferred to either the Elizabeth or the Mariposa and arrived at San Francisco between May 10-12, with letters datestamped May 15 (Gregory pp. III-190). From San Francisco the covers were directed by the straightline handstamp to the Law's Pacific Line Isthmus, departing May 15 and arriving Panama June 16. After transiting to the Atlantic side they were carried by the USMSC Georgia, departing Chagres June 2 and arriving New York July 18. Although the Pacific Mail Steamship Company had an exclusive government contract to carry the mails, Law offered the San Francisco postmaster the use of his ships to convey mail. The postmaster agreed on condition that the senders had to indicate carriage by Law's steamers, thus the rare straightline seen on this cover and the #2 cover. This agreement was a breach of the government contract and was terminated after a few months. Only five Law's Line steamers carried mail to or from Panama during this brief period (Wierenga p. 328). In 1851 the Isthmus was sold to the Pacific Mail Steamship Company and continued to ply the San Francisco-Panama route. (Image)

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Get Market Data for [United States Possessions (Hawaii) Bush & Co., Lahaina ]

E. $ 7,500-10,000

SOLD for $7,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
282 c ImageHonolulu, Hawaiian Is./Jan. 29, 1851. Clear strike of italic-style two-line handstamp in black on cover to Dr. Noah A. Chapin in Newport N.H. and forwarded to Winchester N.H., orange-red San Francisco Cal. 1 Mar.” circular datestamp and red crayon 42" rate (40c transcontinental rate plus 2c ship captain’s fee), manuscript Ford” and 5”, totaled in manuscript to 47”, red Newport N.H. Apr. 10” circular datestamp, manuscript Overland" at lower left suggests the sender intended this to go via Mexico

VERY FINE STRIKE OF THE HONOLULU STRAIGHTLINE, THE FIRST HANDSTAMPED POSTMARK OF HAWAII, USED BY HAWAII’S FIRST POSTMASTER, HENRY M. WHITNEY.

Fred Gregory records a total of 35 examples of this straightline marking. This letter was carried on the Corsair, which departed Honolulu January 31, 1851, and arrived in San Francisco on February 19. It was then carried on the PMSS California from San Francisco to Panama on March 5, 1851. After crossing the isthmus, it was carried on the USMSS Georgia, which departed Chagres around March 27, stopped at Havana on April 3, and arrived in New York on April 7.

Gregory census no. 14. Illustrated in Ashbrook, Vol. II, page 242. Ex Honolulu Advertiser and Goldberg. (Image)

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Get Market Data for [United States Possessions (Hawaii) Honolulu ]

E. $ 7,500-10,000

SOLD for $7,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
283 c ImageHonolulu * U.S. Postage Paid * May 21 (1853). Bold strike of red circular datestamp on cover to Addafer, Russia (now Adavere, Estonia), addressed to Madame C. de Ditmar, par St. Petersbourg, Dorpat et Oberpahlen a Addafer" with notation at top Russie, Gouvernement Livonie”, C.D.” seal on flap, manuscript forwarded by H. Hackfeld Honolulu 21 May” on back, San Francisco Cal. Jul. 5” circular datestamp and PAID” handstamp, red crayon 28” rate (26c postage plus 2c ship fee), red New York Aug. 10” transit datestamp on back and PAID PART” straightline handstamp on front, red AMERICA/UBER BREMEN” two-line handstamp, manuscript German transit fee in blue ink and pencil, Berlin transit (Aug. 30) and Russian receiving backstamps, receipt docketing on back 23 Marz 1853 P. P. Hafen”, light horizontal fold

VERY FINE. A BEAUTIFUL AND RARE COVER FROM THE EXPLORER CARL VON DITMAR ON HIS EXPEDITION TO THE REMOTE KAMCHATKA PENINSULA IN THE EASTERN SIBERIAN MARITIME PROVINCE. MAILED FROM HAWAII TO RUSSIA VIA SAN FRANCISCO, PANAMA, NEW YORK AND BY AMERICAN PACKET TO BREMEN.

We are aware of three covers from Hawaii to Russia. This cover and another (ex Honolulu Advertiser and William H. Gross) are addressed to Madame C(onde) von Ditmar in Addafer. The third cover is addressed to Y. L. Lortsch in Libau. The manuscript notation P.P. Hafen” on the back of this cover and the other to Madame von Ditmar identify their origin. P.P. Hafen” is an abbreviation for Petropavlovsk Hafen (Harbor), located in the Eastern Siberian peninsula of Kamchatka between the Sea of Okhotsk and the Bering Sea. From 1851 to 1855 this remote volcanic region was explored and mapped by Carl von Ditmar (the subject of his book, Reisen and Aufenthalt in Kamchatka in den Jahren 1851-1855). Von Ditmar wrote the letter once contained in this cover on March 23, 1853 (as per receipt docketing) and sent it to Honolulu, probably on a passing whaling vessel. At Honolulu the forwarders, Hackfeld & Co., placed it in the Hawaii-U.S. mail for Russia.

Once it entered the mail at Honolulu, the cover was carried by the British brig Gazelle, which departed Lahaina on June 4, 1853, and arrived in San Francisco on July 5. From there it was carried to Panama on the PMSS Brother Jonathan, which departed on July 15 and arrived around July 28. It crossed the isthmus and was carried from Aspinwall to New York by the USMSS Illinois, which departed on August 1 and arrived on August 10. At New York it was put on the Ocean Line’s Washington, which departed on August 13 and arrived at Bremen on August 29. The address lists St. Petersbourg, Dorpat et Oberpahlen a Addafer” as transit points, which are today in Russia and Estonia. After a journey of more than five months, it reached Madame von Ditmar in early September.

From July 1, 1851, to August 15, 1853, the Bremen Convention rate to Russia was 20c (retained by the U.S.), regardless of the distance to New York. The 28c rate indicated on this cover apparently includes 6c for transcontinental postage (an error) and the 2c ship fee. Postage due to the German postal system was collected from the addressee.

In 1854, the French and British, who were battling Russian forces on the Crimean Peninsula, attacked Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. During the Siege of Petropavlovsk, 988 men with a mere 68 guns managed to defend the outpost against 6 ships with 206 guns and 2,540 French and British soldiers. Despite the heroic defense, Petropavlovsk was abandoned as a strategic liability after the Anglo-French forces withdrew. The next year when a second enemy force came to attack the port, they found it deserted. Frustrated, the ships bombarded the city and withdrew.

Illustrated in Richard F. Winter’s article, United States-Russia Mail: 1840-1875, Part 1: Bremen Mail, British Mail, Prussian Closed Mail” (Chronicle 241), and Gregory’s Hawaii Foreign Mail to 1870 (Vol. I, p. 314). Ex Golden. (Image)

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Get Market Data for [United States Possessions (Hawaii) Honolulu ]

E. $ 15,000-20,000

SOLD for $15,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
284 c ImageHAWAII, 1851, 5c Blue (2). Crocker Type I -- the lefthand position in the setting of two -- a sound example of this rarity, huge top sheet margin, large margins at right and bottom, slightly in at left showing about half of frameline, blue printing ink on back shows through at upper left, free of any faults or repairs, slight wrinkling typical of pelure paper and mentioned only to emphasize the extraordinarily choice condition of this stamp, tied by perfect strike of large segmented grid cancel, bold red Honolulu * Hawaiian-Islands * Oct. 20” (1853) circular datestamp on buff cover from Admiral William Reynolds, U.S. Navy, to his brother, James L. Reynolds, at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, clear strikes of San Francisco Cal. 10 Nov.” circular datestamp with SHIP” and 12” handstamps (10c U.S. collect rate plus 2c ship captain’s fee), parts of two backflaps missing, minor edgewear

VERY FINE. THIS IS THE ONLY SOUND 5-CENT HAWAIIAN MISSIONARY STAMP ON COVER. TRULY ONE OF THE OUTSTANDING COVERS OF WORLDWIDE CLASSIC PHILATELY.

Ten 5c Missionary covers are recorded in our census and the Gregory census. Included in this total are the Dawson 2c/5c cover and the 5c cover acquired by the Smithsonian National Postal Museum in the Honolulu Advertiser sale, leaving eight 5c covers for collectors. Upon further analysis, however, only five of those have a 5c Missionary used without any other stamps, and of those five, one is a front and all but this cover have stamps with minor faults. For the collector who wishes to have a sound 5c Missionary stamp tied on cover, this is the sole cover meeting that criteria.

This cover was carried on the American brig Zoe, which cleared Honolulu on October 22, 1853, and arrived in San Francisco on November 9 (the datestamp was applied the next day). From San Francisco it was carried by the Pacific Mail Steamship Company’s John L. Stephens, departing on November 16 and arriving at Panama City on November 28. The mail was carried across the isthmus to Aspinwall, and from there it left on the U.S. Mail Steamship Company’s Empire City, departing December 1 and arriving in New York on December 12. The recipient, James L. Reynolds of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, paid the 12c United States postage, which included 10c for the unpaid transcontinental rate and 2c for the ship captain’s fee.

This envelope was addressed and mailed by Admiral William Reynolds (1815-1879), the older brother of James L. and John F. Reynolds, all of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. As a midshipman, Admiral Reynolds participated in the Wilkes’ Exploring Expedition of 1838 to 1842. The journal he kept during the expedition was published in book form (The Private Journal of William Reynolds: United States Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842). As a captain, Reynolds served in the Pacific Squadron and was stationed for a time in Hawaii. With the outbreak of the Civil War, he returned to the mainland in 1861 and commanded the forces at Port Royal.

The Reynolds correspondence was first described in Mekeel’s August 19, 1923 issue. The Economist Stamp Company was noted as the buyer, and an unnamed individual identified his great uncle, a naval officer, as the source (Admiral Reynolds). Two recorded Missionary covers come from the Reynolds correspondence: this cover and a 13c cover.

Ex Gibson, Admiral Harris, Golden and Gross. Siegel census no. 2-I-COV-74. Illustrated in Gregory book (page 300). With 1994 and 2016 P.F. certificates. Scott value $90,000.00 on cover (Image)

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E. $ 75,000-100,000

SOLD for $80,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
285 c ImageHAWAII, 1851, 13c Blue, Hawaiian Postage” (3). Crocker Type I -- the lefthand position in the setting of two -- huge margins at top and bottom, touching at sides but framelines intact, small skillful repair at bottom right corner with minor paper addition and small bit of frameline touched up, beautiful deep shade and impression on fresh paper, cancelled by blue PAID” in italicized caps, impression of letters ties stamp to the envelope, addressed to Miss Gertrude Van Ingen, in care of Mrs. D. Crosby, East Hartford, Connecticut, sender’s notation Paid through”, no Honolulu circular datestamp (the devices ordered by Postmaster Whitney did not arrive until early 1852), faint red San Francisco datestamp and matching 6” rate handstamp with bluish-black PAID” handstamp, prepaid 8c U.S. but the ship fee is not reflected in the rate marking (consistent with San Francisco’s practice from July 1, 1851, to May 1, 1852), cover creased but not affecting stamp, faint waterstain at top right just touches corner of stamp

VERY FINE. ONE OF NINE RECORDED 13-CENT HAWAIIAN POSTAGE” MISSIONARY COVERS, SEVEN OF WHICH ARE AVAILABLE TO COLLECTORS. THIS IS THE EARLIEST RECORDED HAWAIIAN MISSIONARY COVER WITH AN INTACT STAMP OF ANY DENOMINATION OR TYPE. IT IS ALSO THE ONLY COVER WITH THE BLUE ITALIC PAID” HANDSTAMP -- ONE OTHER EXAMPLE IS RECORDED ON AN OFF-COVER 13-CENT HAWAIIAN POSTAGE” MISSIONARY.

There are nine recorded genuine covers with full 13c Hawaiian Postage” Missionary stamps, of which this is the earliest. Not counted in the total of nine is a January 3, 1852, folded letter with a fragment of a 13c Hawaiian Postage” Missionary. It is illustrated in the Gregory book (page 274) and described as the first recorded cover franked with a Missionary stamp,” but despite its significance as a dated item, the missing three-quarters of the Missionary stamp limits its collector value. The strip of three on cover acquired by the Smithsonian National Postal Museum in our 1995 Honolulu Advertiser sale is also a very early use (February 20, 1852), but the cover offered here predates it, as we shall explain.

This cover is addressed to Miss Gertrude Van Ingen. There is no content or docketing to indicate the sender’s name, location or mailing date, but it is very likely that it was addressed by J. S. Van Ingen, a well-known merchant on the islands. His name is listed in advertisements for C. F. Hussey & Company, located at Kahului.

The dark brown paper makes it difficult to see the markings on this cover, but with simple digital enhancement, the red San Francisco circular datestamp and red 6” rate handstamp (to the right of the Paid”) are visible. San Francisco marked prepaid covers from Hawaii with the 6” cent rate marking from July 1, 1851, to May 1, 1852. Starting then, the 8” cent marking, which reflected the 2c ship captain’s fee, was used on prepaid letters from Hawaii. Unfortunately, the date of the San Francisco marking is not readable on this cover. However, the digital enhancement shows that there are no other markings on the cover, a significant fact that allows us to date its origin to sometime prior to February 10, 1852. Postmaster Whitney ordered datestamps from the mainland in May 1851, but the devices were not received in Honolulu until several months later. The first recorded example is dated February 10, 1852. Whitney might have started using them even earlier.

The letter with the fragment might help narrow the date range. That letter was mailed at Kahului and carried overland to Lahaina, where the Lahaina postmaster, George Gower (Collector of Customs and the postmaster 1851-54) affixed the stamp to show that postage was fully prepaid (it is cancelled with pen marks). The Lahaina post office probably applied the distinctive Paid” cancel in bold italicized capital letters. Lahaina had a tradition of using blue ink for postal markings, and loose type was readily available to create a temporary Paid” handstamp. One other example of this cancellation is recorded, also struck on a 13c Hawaiian Postage” Missionary (3-I-CAN-99).

The January 3, 1852, letter with the fragment has the same San Francisco markings -- red datestamp and 6” and bluish-black Paid” -- and the San Francisco date is February 18 (1852). The Gregory book (page 274) provides sailing vessels and dates for the mail containing the January 3 letter. The combination of red and black ink for the markings applied at San Francisco is very unusual. It is possible that the cover offered here, with the same red and black combination, was in the Hawaiian mail that was postmarked at San Francisco on February 18. Based on the Van Ingen connection, there is also a strong possibility that this cover, like the other, originated in Kahului.

Ex Admiral Harris, Ishikawa, Golden and Gross. Siegel census no. 3-I-COV-136. Illustrated in Gregory book (page 397). With 1994 and 2016 P.F. certificates. Scott value $75,000.00 on cover (Image)

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Get Market Data for [United States Possessions (Hawaii) 3 ]

E. $ 40,000-50,000

SOLD for $45,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
286 c Image12c Black (17). Large margins to barely touched, tied by "San Francisco Cal. 20 May" (1856) circular datestamp on cover to Miss Abby Marshall in Charlestown Mass., bold strike of red "Honolulu * U.S. Postage Paid * Apr. 14" circular datestamp, few cosmetic improvements around edges, stamp slightly affected from placement at edge of cover

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. A CHOICE EXAMPLE OF THE 12-CENT 1851 USED FROM HAWAII, PAYING THE 10-CENT TRANSCONTINENTAL POSTAGE AND 2-CENT SHIP CAPTAIN'S FEE.

Carried on the American schooner Julius Pringle, which departed Honolulu April 14, 1856, and arrived in San Francisco on May 6 (the mail was not stamped until May 20 or 21). With 1988 P.F. certificate (Image)

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Get Market Data for [United States Possessions (Hawaii) 17 ]

E. $ 2,000-3,000

SOLD for $1,900.00
Will close during Public Auction
287 ng ImageHAWAII, 1859, 1c Light Blue, Bluish White (12). Plate 2-A, Type VI (Westerberg Position 6), unused (no gum), ample even margins

VERY FINE. A BEAUTIFUL AND RARE SOUND UNUSED EXAMPLE OF THE 1859 ONE-CENT BLUE HAWAIIAN NUMERAL ISSUE.

With 2003 P.F. certificate (Image)

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Get Market Data for [United States Possessions (Hawaii) 12 ]

$ 15,000.00

SOLD for $9,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
288 c ImageHAWAII, 1859, 2c Dark Blue, Comma after Cents” (13b). Plate 1-A, Type X (Westerberg Position 2), top sheet margin, other sides large to huge except where a bit irregular at left, dark shade and strong impression typical of First Printing, tied by manuscript Kau” cancellation and brownish-black Collector’s Office/Hilo. Hawaii” in oval handstamp on folded cover addressed with blue ink in Hawaiian to Levi Haalelea at Honolulu, pencil note inside indicates that the letter originated at Ninoles, slight toning

VERY FINE. ONE OF TWO RECORDED FULL COVERS BEARING A NUMERAL ISSUE FROM PLATE 1-A, AS WELL AS THE UNIQUE EXAMPLE OF THE COMMA AFTER CENTS” VARIETY ON COVER.

Before August 1859, Hawaiian inter-island mail was carried free of charge by schooners, and there was no charge for letters delivered locally. With the rise in inter-island correspondence came a greater need for collecting postage. In 1859 the postal laws were amended to include a 2c per half-ounce postage rate for inter-island letters (and 1c for printed matter), effective August 1. Drop letters left at and picked up at the same post office were not subject to postage, nor were consignee letters handled by ship captains, as long as they did not go through the post office.

The stamps available in 1859 were 5c and 13c denominations that were unsuitable for inter-island mail. In July 1859 the 1c and 2c Numeral stamps were put on sale through post offices. The stamps were printed from newspaper type on a small hand-operated Ruggles card press. The early printings were made at the offices of Henry M. Whitney’s newspaper, the Pacific Commercial Advertiser. Later printings were made by another private printer and at the Government Printing Office. The different settings of type are called Plates” by collectors, but the correct printer’s terminology would be typeset forms.”

The 1859 Numerals were printed in blue ink on bluish white paper. The 2c Blue was printed from Plate 1-A (and possibly two variations, 1-B and 1-C), Plate 3-A and 3-B. Each plate (or setting) comprised ten subjects, forming a complete pane. It is known that some, and possibly all, of the different Numeral stamps were issued in sheets of 50 (five impressions of the setting of ten).

The 1859 Blue Numeral Issue is quite rare on cover. No example of the 1c Blue has been found on cover, and it has been reported that approximately 15 covers exist with the 2c Blue (excluding fronts from the Catholic Mission correspondence).

This remarkable cover is an extremely early use of the Numeral issue. It is one of two complete covers known to us with a stamp from Plate 1-A and the only recorded example of the Comma after Cents” variety on cover. The other full cover and a front with 2c stamps from Plate 1-A were in the Pietsch collection (Shreves Philatelic Galleries, September 27-28, 1996, lots 1066 and 1069). This stamp and the one on the front show the characteristics we attribute to the First Printing: the Dark Blue shade and strong impression, and, in this Type X position, the Comma after Cents” variety. The other full cover is offered in this sale as lot 43, and the stamp on that cover shows a distinctly different shade and impression.

The five 2c Blue Numeral stamps with the Comma after Cents” variety known to us are: 1) Plate 1-A, Ty. X (Pos. 2), tear at right, two holes repaired, ex Honolulu Advertiser; 2) Plate 1-A, Type X (Pos. 2), on cover from Hilo to Honolulu, ex Honolulu Advertiser and Gross, the cover offered here; 3) Plate 1-A, Type X (Pos. 2), off cover, pen cancel, ex Crocker, Pietsch and Steiner; 4) Plate 3-A, Type I (Pos. 3), ex Ishikawa and Golden; and 5) Plate 1-A, Type X (Pos. 2), 2017 Rarities sale.

The cover is also interesting from a postal history perspective. With the introduction of inter-island postage rates and adhesive stamps, postmasters were instructed to cross the Hawaiian stamps...in ink” pending the distribution of cancelling devices. This is one of the few Kau” post office markings and the only one on cover. The Kau postmaster, Rev. W. C. Shipman, routed his mail through Hilo from January 1856 to September 1860, after which time the post office sent mails directly between Honolulu and Kau. On this cover, the Hilo office cancelled the stamp a second time with its oval Collector’s Office” handstamp.

The addressee, Liwai (Levi) Haalelea, was an important figure in Hawaiian history. His wife was Princess Kekauonohi, the granddaughter of Kamehameha I. She was one of the five wives of Kamehameha II and was present on the occasion of the famous meal at which the eating kapu was overturned and with it the entire kapu system in 1819. In 1828 she married Aaron Keliiahonui, son of Kaumualii, the last King of Kauai. One year after his death in 1849, she married Levi Haalelea. She died in Honolulu in June 1851.

Ex Honolulu Advertiser and Gross. With 1976 P.F. certificate. Scott value $12,500.00 on cover is the same as Scott 13, which is more common. (Image)

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Get Market Data for [United States Possessions (Hawaii) 13b ]

E. $ 10,000-15,000

SOLD for $11,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
289 c ImageHAWAII, 1859, 2c Blue, Bluish White (13). Plate 1-A, Type IV (Westerberg Position 8), ample margins all around, crisp shade, tied by red Postage Paid” oval handstamp on brown cover to J. C. McLean at street address in Honolulu, probably carried on an inter-island schooner and cancelled on arrival at Honolulu, professionally restored with edges resealed and small edge faults mended, pressed creases, but none of this cosmetic work affects the stamp, the overall appearance is beautiful

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. ONE OF TWO RECORDED FULL COVERS BEARING A NUMERAL ISSUE FROM PLATE 1-A, AND ONE OF THE FEW 1859 2-CENT BLUE NUMERAL COVERS EXTANT WITH THE RED HONOLULU POSTAGE PAID” OVAL TYING THE STAMP.

It has been reported that approximately 15 covers are known with the 2c Blue Numeral Issue (the 1c Blue is not recorded on cover). This beautiful cover is one of two complete covers known to us with a 2c Numeral from Plate 1-A. The other full cover is offered in lot 288. The third use of a 2c stamp from Plate 1-A is a front that was in the Pietsch collection (Shreves Philatelic Galleries, September 27-28, 1996, lot 1066). This stamp differs from the others in shade and impression.

Ex Seybold (backstamps), Admiral Harris, Pietsch and Gross. Scott value $12,500.00 on cover. (Image)

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Get Market Data for [United States Possessions (Hawaii) 13 ]

E. $ 5,000-7,500

SOLD for $6,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
290 c ImageHAWAII, 1859, 2c Blue, Bluish White (13). Plate 3-A, Type I (Westerberg Position 3), ample margins to just touching frameline, deep shade, pen cancel with vertical line and two squiggles at sides, not tied but properly used on cover addressed in the hand of Lucy Goodale Thurston to Ellen R. Goodale, probably mailed from Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, faint waterstaining

VERY FINE. ONE OF AN ESTIMATED FIFTEEN COVERS EXTANT WITH THE 1859 2-CENT BLUE NUMERAL.

The addressee, Ellen Rebecca (Whitmore) Goodale, was married to Warren Goodale. She was a teacher at a Cherokee school in Oklahoma when she married. She died at age 33 on February 22, 1861, about one year after receiving this letter. The writing on this cover is in the hand of Lucy Goodale Thurston.

Ex Honolulu Advertiser and Gross. With 1967 and 1995 P.F. certificates. Scott value $12,500.00 on cover. (Image)

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E. $ 2,000-3,000

SOLD for $2,600.00
Will close during Public Auction
291 c ImageHAWAII, 1859-63, 2c Black, Grayish (16). Plate 3-D, Type III (Westerberg Position 1) with raised "I" of "INTER", large margins, tied by red "Postage Paid" oval (applied on arrival) on cover to Bishop Maigret at the Catholic Mission in Honolulu, unusual lengthy address and European size envelope, cover tear at top and some edgewear

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. A BEAUTIFUL EXAMPLE OF THE 1859-63 2-CENT HAWAIIAN NUMERAL TIED BY THE HONOLULU RED "POSTAGE PAID" OVAL ON COVER TO THE CATHOLIC BISHOP.

Louis Maigret (1804-82) served as the first vicar apostolic of the Vicariate Apostolic of the Hawaiian Islands, now the Roman Catholic Diocese of Honolulu. Born in France, Maigret was ordained to the priesthood as a member of the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary in September 1828 at the age of 24. As part of his missionary work, Father Maigret sailed to the Kingdom of Hawaii to help build its Catholic community of native Hawaiians. When the Vicar Apostolic of Oriental Oceania, Etienne Jerome Rouchouze, was lost at sea on board the ill-fated Marie Joseph, the Holy See appointed Father Maigret as the first vicar apostolic of the Sandwich Islands in September 1846 at the age of 42. He was officially ordained as a bishop in November 1847. As bishop, Maigret oversaw the construction of what would become his most lasting legacy, the Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace. After his death, Bishop Maigret was entombed in the crypt below the sanctuary (source: Wikipedia).

Ex Caspary, Burrus, Golden and Frajola. With 2011 P.F. certificate. Scott value $5,000.00 on cover. (Image)

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Get Market Data for [United States Possessions (Hawaii) 16 ]

E. $ 2,000-3,000

SOLD for $2,500.00
Will close during Public Auction

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