• Login Password

    Please Login. You are NOT Logged in.

Login to Use StampAuctionNetwork.
New Member? Click "Register".

StampAuctionNetwork Channels

Help:



 

Record Holders for Stamps sold Live on the Internet.
These lots all Sold to StampAuctionNetwork Live Bidders

Firm Sale Lot Descrip Realized
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Steven C. Walske Collection of Hawaiian Postal History - Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. - June 25, 2013 11 HAWAII, 1851, 2c Blue (1) and 5c Blue (2). Both Type II--the righthand position in each setting of two--the Missionary stamps are free of any repairs and are essentially in Very Fine condition, the 2c has mostly ample to large margins with framelines complete all around except for a small nick in the upper left corner, where a tiny part of the line has been filled in on the lettersheet, the 5c has three mostly ample margins and is just barely in along frameline at left, there is a short closed tear at bottom and a small part of the frameline has been filled in at bottom right, each Missionary stamp is tied by the Honolulu 7-bar grid cancel on a bluish folded cover addressed in the hand of William C. Dawson to Miss Eliza A. Dawson, Care Jacob H. Dawson, 273 Cherry Street, New York” with notation on back Give my love to all”, to the left of the stamps is a clearly struck red Honolulu * U.S. Postage Paid * Oct. 4” (1852) circular datestamp, the Hawaiian Missionaries are used in combination with a horizontal pair of United States 1851 3c Brownish Carmine (11A), Positions 41-42L2L, 1852 printing from Plate 2 Late, ample margins to just slightly in at bottom left, tied by San Francisco Cal. 27 Oct.” circular datestamp with Cal.” in upper and lower case letters

THE ONLY KNOWN COVER BEARING THE HAWAIIAN 2-CENT MISSIONARY AND THE ONLY INTACT COVER WITH TWO DIFFERENT DENOMINATIONS OF HAWAIIAN MISSIONARY STAMPS. THE RAREST AND MOST FAMOUS OF ALL HAWAIIAN AND UNITED STATES COVERS, AND UNIVERSALLY RANKED AMONG THE WORLD’S MOST IMPORTANT PHILATELIC ITEMS.

Exhibited among The Aristocrats of Philately” at Anphilex 1971 (New York City), Interphil 1976 (Philadelphia) and Anphilex 1996 (New York City). Shown by invitation in the Courts of Honor of 15 international philatelic exhibitions (last displayed at Washington 2006) and illustrated in the exhibition catalogues for London 1980 and World Stamp Expo 1989. Displayed in the Gems of Hawaii: The Persis Collection” exhibit at the Smithsonian National Postal Museum in celebration of the museum’s first anniversary. Pictured on the United States Postal Service 2002 souvenir sheet designed by Richard Sheaff (Scott 3694).

Illustrated in Rare Stamps, L. N. and M. Williams, Encyclopedia of Rare and Famous Stamps, L. N. Williams, described and illustrated in Meyer-Harris Hawaii, Its Stamps and Postal History, and Gregory Hawaii Foreign Mails to 1870 (Figure 15-28 and pictured on the front cover of Volume I), featured in Life magazine’s The World's Greatest Stamps” (May 3, 1954) and on the cover of Esquire magazine (October 1956).

Ex George H. Worthington (pencil 3/11/05 New Eng. S. Co. ISSS SS”), Alfred F. Lichtenstein, Alfred H. Caspary, Benjamin D. Phillips, Alfred J. Ostheimer III, Honolulu Advertiser (Thurston Twigg-Smith/Persis Corporation) and Guido Craveri/Tito Giamporcaro.

Siegel Census No. 1-II-COV-15. Gregory Census No. 2c-1 and 5c-2. With 1995 Philatelic Foundation certificate stating it is genuine.”

For an introduction to the Hawaiian Missionaries: http://siegelauctions.com/2013/1045/Missionaries.pdf

For additional description and information about the correspondence and voyage: http://siegelauctions.com/2013/1045/Dawson.pdf

$1,950,000
Shreves Philatelic Galleries, Inc. The William H. Gross Collection of Great Britain Line Engraved Postage Stamps 1840-1841 - June 11, 2007 53 The extraordinary "Lady Louis" uprated Mulready envelope to Malta, envelope (A151) addressed to Lady Louis, Malta and inscribed via Falmouth, bearing 1p Black, DA, Plate V (state 2) single, a 1p Black, PA-PD horizontal strip $650,000
Shreves Philatelic Galleries, Inc. The William H. Gross Collection of Great Britain Line Engraved Postage Stamps 1840-1841 - June 11, 2007 45 AE-BE vertical pair and DC-DE horizontal strip of three, Plate 1, uprating a Mulready 2p envelope, a209, to India (slightly refolded at top to its original pre-use position), from Bristol (30 Sept. 1840) to Ajmeer redirected to Agra $450,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. 2014 Rarities of the World - June 26, 2014 1111 30c Ultramarine & Carmine, Flags Inverted (121b). Unused (no gum), deep rich colors and proof-like impressions, nearly perfect centering with well-balanced margins

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF SEVEN RECORDED UNUSED EXAMPLES OF THE 30-CENT 1869 PICTORIAL INVERT, AND ONE OF ONLY TWO OR THREE SOUND COPIES. ONE OF THE GREATEST RARITIES OF UNITED STATES PHILATELY.

Only seven unused examples of the 30c 1869 Pictorial Issue with inverted flags are known. Only one has original gum (recently sold in our auction of the Beverly Hills collection for $600,000 hammer). The other six have no gum. Of the seven unused copies, the original-gum example is sound, as is the example offered here. One other is potentially sound, but has not been seen since 1960. Therefore, it is possible that this and the original-gum example are the only two completely sound unused examples of the 30c 1869 Pictorial Invert.

Census No. 121b-UNC-02. Ex Colonel Stillwell (Siegel Sale 413, sold by order of U.S. Trust Co.). Acquired by the current owner in our 1975 Rarities sale. With 2014 P.F. certificate.

Click here for a census of the unused 30c 1869 Pictorial Issue Inverts: http://siegelauctions.com/2013/1052/30c_Unused.pdf

$290,000

***New to this List***

Matthew Bennett International Public Auction: U.S. and Canada - May 13-14, 2014 673 Airmail, 1918, 24¢ carmine rose & blue, center inverted (C3a), Position 89, bright fresh and well centered within large margins, gorgeous, fresh and rich colors; original gum just a bit disturbed, small thin spot and light crease, none of which affect the choice, Very Fine appearance.
Scott $450,000

ONE OF THE MOST HANDSOME EXAMPLES OF THIS RENOWNED U.S. ERROR EXTANT. THE PRESENT SINGLE IS ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER THAT IS BOTH FRESH AND WELL CENTERED. WITH SO MANY OF THESE STAMPS HAVING MAJOR DISTRACTIONS- 19 ARE STRAIGHT EDGED, MANY ARE OFF CENTERED, SOME HAVE LOST THE GUM ENTIRELY, SOME HAVE MORE SEVERE FAULTS AND SEVEN ARE APPARENTLY LOST- THE EXAMPLE OFFERED HERE IS CLEARLY AMONG THE MOST ATTRACTIVE AND DESIRABLE.

Expertization: 1991 & 2012 P.F. Certificates.

Provenance: Maffeo, Barden "Liberty".

The story behind the "Inverted Jenny" is certainly one of the most well-known and fascinating in all of stamp collecting. It began with the somewhat hurried decision, in early 1918 (with the First World War still in progress), to issue a set of three postage stamps for the first official U.S. airmail flight, then scheduled for May 1918. Production time was extremely limited. Moreover the high value of the set, the 24¢ value, was to be issued in two colors (red and blue), with one color to be printed first, and the printed sheets then reinserted in the printing presses for the second color. Despite all efforts to catch any printing errors, one sheet of 100 stamps, printed with the second color (the "Jenny" in the center of the stamp), upside down, managed to escape detection.

This error sheet was sold to Mr. William T. Robey, a stamp collector living in Washington, D.C. He normally bought a full sheet of each new postage stamp as it was issued, for his collection, and it was therefore natural for him to try to acquire a sheet of the new airmail stamps. Robey could barely contain his excitement when the postal clerk (not suspecting or noticing the error) brought out the sheet for him. Robey bought the sheet (this was during his lunch hour) and returned to his job as a stockbroker's clerk, where he told a few friends about his amazing find. They in turn tried to buy more of those stamps "with the upside down airplane". A few hours later postal inspectors were asking Robey to sell the sheet back to them. Robey naturally refused. The next day on May 15, 1918 Robey wrote to the famous dealer Elliot Perry saying "I have secured a sheet of 100 with inverted centers". (the letter was sold in our Sale 201, June 1997)

In the end, though he did not sell it to Perry, but to a well-known dealer Eugene Klein, who sold the sheet to Col. Edward Green. The sheet was then broken up into singles and blocks.
Scott $450,000
$230,000
Shreves Philatelic Galleries, Inc. The William H. Gross Collection of Great Britain Line Engraved Postage Stamps 1840-1841 - June 11, 2007 32 BG, Plate 7, select four margin example tied to very scarce 1841 registered folded letter to Antrim, Ireland, superbly cancelled by a central strike of a black Maltese Cross, red double boxed "PAID/AP27/1841" handstamp $200,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The MLG Collection of United States Plate Blocks - April 21-23, 2009 1167 $2.00 Dark Blue (277a). Top imprint and plate no. 84 block of six, original gum, bottom side stamps h.r., tiny hinge slivers are barely noticeable and placed as a preventive measure, rich color, unusually choice centering throughout

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. A BEAUTIFUL ORIGINAL-GUM TOP IMPRINT AND PLATE NUMBER BLOCK OF SIX OF THE $2.00 1895 WATERMARKED BUREAU ISSUE IN THE DARK BLUE SHADE.

This issue was printed from only one printing plate -- Plate 84. Lewis Kaufman's records contain only five plate blocks of this issue -- all are described as the Dark Blue shade: 1) top plate block of six, from our 1986 Rarities sale and offered here, 2) the plate block offered in the following lot, from our 1985 Rarities sale and ex Wampler, 3) top plate block of six, offered in our 1967 Rarities sale and illustrated in Durland book, 4) top plate block, regummed, ex Simon (1975 Siegel sale), and 5) top plate block, selvage partly separated and rejoined, offered in Oct. 1974 Siegel sale and more recently in the Newport collection.

With 1971 P.F. certificate

$160,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Gordon Eubanks Collection of the U.S. 1869 Pictorial Issue - March 1, 2011 182 90c Carmine & Black (122). Vertical block of six, original gum, clearly-defined grills, rich colors and detailed impressions, long and full perforations all around

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS IS BY FAR THE FINER OF THE TWO RECORDED ORIGINAL-GUM BLOCKS OF SIX OF THE 90-CENT 1869 PICTORIAL ISSUE, WHICH IS THE LARGEST RECORDED INTACT MULTIPLE. THIS BLOCK IS THE ONLY ONE WITH FULL ORIGINAL GUM. THE HIGHLIGHT OF THE CASPARY AND EUBANKS 1869 PICTORIAL ISSUE COLLECTIONS AND ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT CLASSIC UNITED STATES BLOCKS EXTANT.

The contract for the 1869 Pictorial Issue was awarded to National Bank Note Co. in February 1869 by the outgoing Johnson administration (Grant was inaugurated March 4, 1869). Three of the ten stamps had traditional portraits: the 1c Franklin, 6c Washington and 90c Lincoln. The other values represented a radical departure from the portraiture of all previous issues, depicting scenes of fast communication and historical events.

Contemporary critical review was unexpectedly negative. While preceding issues had been current for 7 to 10 years and the 1870 Bank Note issue lasted 18 years, not even a year was given to the 1869 Pictorial Issue. For the 90c, the portrait of Lincoln was admired, but the "prison bars" behind his head were criticized.

The 90c stamps were intended to be used on heavy domestic packages or on multiple-rate mail to foreign destinations. Given the high cost of the stamp (equivalent to $14.33 in today's money), the 90c 1869's were not bought in any quantity to be stored and used later, as was the case with lower-denomination stamps. With the reduction in many foreign treaty rates, the 90c could only be used on multiple-rate letters. The short lifespan of the 1869 Pictorial Issue closed the window of opportunity for the public to buy the 90c Lincoln stamps at the post office.

Only one 90c on cover is recorded: the famous "Ice House" cover, sold by the Siegel firm for $375,000 hammer. There are two recorded unused blocks of six, the largest recorded unused multiples: 1) full original gum, sound, the block offered here, ex Caspary, Kapiloff and Joseph, and 2) traces of original gum, slightly dry print at right, right center stamp small thin spot, perfs strengthened and rejoined, ex Hind, Bechtel, Zoellner and Ainsworth (now in the Gross collection). There is also a reconstructed unused block of eight (ex Lafayette).

Ex Caspary, Kapiloff and Joseph. With 2010 P.F. certificate. Unpriced in Scott Catalogue as a block of six

$150,000
Matthew Bennett International U.S. and British North America Stamps and Postal History - February 28-29, 2012 553 Airmail, 1918, 24¢ carmine rose & blue, center inverted (C3a), position 89, bright, fresh and well centered, disturbed original gum, small thin spot and light crease, Very Fine appearance.
Scott $450,000

ONE OF THE MOST HANDSOME EXAMPLES OF THIS RENOWNED U.S. ERROR EXTANT.

Expertization: 1991 PF Certificate.

Provenance: Maffeo. Scott $450,000
$150,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Wagshal Collection, Part 2: 1c 1851-56 Imperforate - September 30th - October 1st, 2010 638 The Matching Pair of 12c 1851 Bisects on Covers to Canada. Two grayish blue folded covers addressed in different hands to Thomas Casey in Quebec, Canada, both covers entered the mails in New York City on the same day -- Thursday, August 21, 1851 -- and were stamped by the same person, one franked with upper right diagonal half of 12c Black (17a) and horizontal strip of four 1c Blue, Ty. II-II-IIIa-IIIa (7-7-8A-8A), Positions 53-56R1E, ample margins to slightly in (small corner crease at top left), other with matching lower left diagonal half of the same 12c Black (17a) and horizontal strip of four 1c Blue, Ty. II (7), Positions 83-86R1E, ample margins to just touched, both 1c strips undoubtedly cut from the same sheet from Plate 1 Early, the 12c bisects have mostly full margins (upper right just clear at top and lower left with tiny crease at tip of point), stamps on both covers well-tied by multiple strikes of "New-York Aug. 21" (1851) circular datestamp, each cover with red "Montreal L.C. AU 21 1851" circular datestamp and "U.States" in scroll handstamp on front and "Quebec L.C. Aug. 24, 1851" receiving datestamp on back, receipt docketing notations in the same hand indicate the name and location of each sender: the former (with upper right bisect) docketed "Messr. Drake Bros & Co. Havana, 7 August 1851" and the latter (with lower left bisect) docketed "Hy. A. Coit Esq. N. York", light folds at bottom of each cover do not affect stamps or appearance

VERY FINE. A SPECTACULAR PAIR OF COVERS BEARING MATCHING HALVES OF THE SAME 12-CENT 1851 ISSUE STAMP, EACH USED WITH A STRIP OF FOUR ONE-CENT 1851 ISSUE STAMPS FROM PLATE ONE EARLY TO PAY THE 10-CENT TREATY RATE TO CANADA -- ONE ORIGINATING IN CUBA AND THE OTHER IN NEW YORK CITY. THESE EXTRAORDINARY COVERS ARE AMONG THE GREATEST ITEMS IN CLASSIC UNITED STATES PHILATELY AND POSTAL HISTORY.

The pair of covers offered here is remarkable in several respects. To begin, these covers were stamped in New York City on August 21, 1851, using the new 1851 Issue, which was released just seven weeks earlier on July 1 (the earliest documented date of use of the 12c 1851 is August 4, 1851). Further, the use of a 12c bisect to pay part of the 10c treaty rate to Canada is highly unusual. Although the 10c treaty rate took effect on April 6, 1851, the U.S. Post Office Department did not issue a 10c stamp until 1855, so the 10c rate was usually made up with 1c and 3c stamps. We are aware of three covers to the province of New Brunswick with 12c 1851 bisects used with 1c and 3c 1851 stamps, but no other covers are known with strips of the 1c used with a bisect or mailed at this early date. This is the earliest documented use of a 12c bisect, and the use of bisects was prohibited in late 1853. Finally, the unusual circumstance of mailing -- mailed on the same day by the same person to the same addressee, but originating from two different correspondents -- provides a fascinating explanation for the two identical frankings and use of matching halves of the same 12c stamp.

We have been unable to learn anything of substance about the addressee, Thomas Casey. The notation at the lower left of the cover from Havana either reads "v/ New York" (via New York) to describe the route or "of New York" to describe the addressee's residence. An internet search for Thomas Casey in New York City or in Quebec during the relevant time period failed to produce any information. We can surmise that the senders conducted business with Thomas Casey, and we know something about their businesses. Drake Brothers & Company was a large New York-based trading firm founded in the 1790's by British-born immigrant James Drake. The firm traded in sugar, coffee, jerked beef and precious metals, and it owned one of the largest plantations in Cuba, in collaboration with the United States Mail Steamship Company (Richard P. Tucker, Insatiable Appetite: The United States and the Ecological Degradation of the Tropical World). Henry A. Coit was also a New York-based merchant and served as a director on at least one insurance company's board (New York Times digital archives).

Drake Brothers & Company's connection to the United States Mail Steamship Company (USMSC) gives us a clue about how the cover travelled from Cuba to New York City. According to United States Incoming Steamship Mail 1847-1875 (page 342), the USMSC Cherokee arrived in New York on August 21, 1851, after departing Havana around August 17. The previous sailing from Havana left on August 2, before the Drake Brothers letter was written on August 7 (per receipt docketing). Although no forwarder marking appears on either cover, they were almost certainly handled by an agent in New York City, who would have had instructions to forward letters to Thomas Casey in Quebec. Beneath the stamps on each letter is a pencil "10", indicating the rate for a letter to Canada. This type of notation is typical of mail handled by forwarding agents.

The two covers were together when they first appeared in the January 1900 auction of the F. W. Hunter collection, held by Scott Stamp & Coin Co. They went separate ways after the 1900 Hunter sale, but the covers were illustrated and described in Ashbrook's Special Service in 1952 (pages 98, 106-107 and 163, photos 47 and 75), at which point they were still apart in different collections. In an article by Mortimer L. Neinken in the May 1970 Chronicle (No. 66, page 63-65), he recapped the history of the two covers (quoting Ashbrook) and coyly noted "this commentator has ascertained that the two covers are now reunited in one collection again." In fact, it was Mortimer Neinken who reunited the covers when he bought one in 1961 and the other in 1970.

The former cover with upper right bisect is known as the "Emerson" cover and its pedigree is as follows: ex F. W. Hunter (Scott Stamp & Coin Co. sale, Jan. 10-12, 16-18, 1900, lots 189-190), W. A. Smith, Spiegelberg (J. C. Morgenthau sale, Jan. 10, 1911, lot 15), Barry (Nassau Stamp Co. sale, Apr. 2-3, 1914, lot 84), Judge Robert S. Emerson (Daniel F. Kelleher Co. sale, Oct. 19, 1937, lot 78), Philip H. Ward private collection (per Ashbrook's Special Service, Feb. 1, 1953), H. R. Harmer sale (Feb. 17, 1970, lot 156) and Mortimer L. Neinken (acquired by Jerome S. Wagshal privately from the Neinken estate).

The latter cover with lower left bisect is known as the "Hind" cover and its pedigree is as follows: ex F. W. Hunter (Scott Stamp & Coin Co. sale, Jan. 10-12, 16-18, 1900, lots 189-190), Arthur Hind (Phillips-Kennett sale, Nov. 20, 1933, lot 145), Carl Brandenbury (Percy Doane sale, Dec. 6, 1943, lot 76), John A. Fox sale (Dec. 12, 1961, lot 582) and Mortimer L. Neinken (acquired by Jerome S. Wagshal privately from the Neinken estate).

$135,000
Shreves Philatelic Galleries, Inc. The William H. Gross Collection of Great Britain Line Engraved Postage Stamps 1840-1841 - June 11, 2007 28 DK-EL, Plate 7, a fabulously fresh and choice right sheet-margin block of four with partial "PRIC" imprint at bottom right, other margins quite large except EK just touched at bottom, in an incredible state of preservation $130,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. United States Stamps - December 13-15, 2011 59 10c Black (2). Original gum, lightly hinged at top, huge to large margins, detailed impression clearly showing every detail of the engraving, fresh deeply blued paper

EXTREMELY FINE GEM AND EASILY ONE OF THE FINEST ORIGINAL-GUM EXAMPLES OF THE 10-CENT 1847 ISSUE IN EXISTENCE. THIS IS ONE OF THE MOST DIFFICULT STAMPS TO OBTAIN IN COMPLETELY SOUND ORIGINAL-GUM CONDITION WITH FOUR LARGE MARGINS. THIS SUPERB STAMP IS A TRUE CONDITION RARITY AND A MARVELOUS EXAMPLE OF THE FIRST UNITED STATES GENERAL ISSUE.

The Act of March 3, 1847, signed by President Polk, specified that Postmaster General Cave Johnson "be authorized to prepare postage stamps, which when attached to any letter or packet, shall be evidence of the payment of the postage..." The law's effective date was July 1, and the Post Office acted immediately to secure a contract with Rawdon, Wright, Hatch and (the new partner) Edson, so that stamps could be distributed by that date. The Washington vignette is based on the iconic image painted by Gilbert Stuart.

With 2011 P.F. certificate

$120,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. United States and Foreign Stamps and Covers - December 10-14, 2012 1406 1c Blue, Ty. II-II/II-II/III-IIIA (7-7/7- 7/8-8A). Positions 79-80/89-90/99-100R2, block of six containing Position 99R2, original gum, h.r. at top, huge margins to just in at top, including bottom right corner sheet margins, Position 89R2 with pronounced double transfer, vertical crease affects right stamps, top left stamp sealed tear at top, the most important stamp (bottom left, Position 99R2) is completely sound

VERY FINE-EXTREMELY FINE. AN EXTREMELY RARE ORIGINAL-GUM BLOCK OF SIX FROM THE BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER OF THE RIGHT PANE OF PLATE 2. THIS PHENOMENAL MULTIPLE CONTAINS THE ONLY TWO STAMPS ON THE PLATE THAT ARE NOT TYPE II. IT ALSO CONTAINS TWO OF THE MOST PRONOUNCED DOUBLE TRANSFERS ON ANY CLASSIC UNITED STATES PRINTING PLATE, ONE OF WHICH IS THE FAMOUS POSITION 99R2. A MULTIPLE OF THE HIGHEST ORDER OF RARITY.

Plate 2 was made in late 1855, and consists of 198 stamps that are Type II, one position that is Type III (99R2) and one that is Type IIIA (100R2).

Guide dots were used to correctly lay out the spacing for the plate. According to the Neinken book, Positions 79 and 89 were transferred perfectly using their guide dots. However, the guide dot to the south-east of Position 88R2, which was used to align the single B Relief for Position 99R2, was placed far out of line. The misplaced dot was accidentally used and the bed of the press was moved too far, resulting in the bottom part of the A Relief being transferred into the bottom part of Position 89 (and in the margin below this position) by mistake. "The original entry of Position 99R was out of place and so it was erased or burnished out, but seemingly no attempt was made to erase the parts of the A Relief transferred into the bottom of Position 89R."

When the fresh entry was made in Position 99R a full transfer of the design was not possible without running into the error in Position 89R. The position was therefore short transferred at top, and apparently also at bottom, creating the finest example of Type III found on any plate (see pp. 183-184 of Neinken book).

With copy of 1981 P.F. certificate. From our 1981 Rarities sale and offered to the market for the first time in 31 years. Scott Retail as block of four of No. 7 and pair of these positions

$120,000
H.R. Harmer, Inc. - Collections Sale 197 1074 POWERFUL CANADA SELECTION Victorian well centered NH classics through sheets of more modern errors and varieties, back of the book, booklets, revenues, and a bit of Newfoundland and provinces, etc all on dealer pages with description and pricing, retail values range from around $30 or so to over a dozen in excess of $10,000, premium in abundance with some spectacular as what’s shown in the scan plus Classics well centered Jubilee issues, 1897-98 Leaf Issue blocks, useful Admirals and the popular commems of the 1920's-1940's incl Officials, Modern Errors and Varieties definitives EFO's incl imperfs, color missing and color shifts with multiples and full sheets, numerous coil and booklet errors and varieties, 1992 Hologram issue varieties, 1998 45c Flag over Building imperf pane of 120, 2000 47c QE II full imperf sheet, etc plus those shown in the scans, incl many issues present in largest known multiples or representing a significant portion of the known examples, select quality throughout with many accompanying certificates, some duplication in the modern material, mostly VF or better, across the board Canada material in select condition rarely offered in such profusion. $110,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Jay Hoffman Collection of United States Stamps - May 8-9, 2008 287 2c Pan-American, Center Inverted (295a). Lightly hinged, superbly centered with wide balanced margins, rich color and clear impressions of vignette and frame

EXTREMELY FINE. ONE OF THE FINEST ORIGINAL-GUM EXAMPLES OF THE 2-CENT PAN-AMERICAN INVERT.

The 2c is the rarest of the three Pan-American Inverts. It is surmised that approximately 200 were issued through the post office, with two distinct shades known. Estimates of surviving examples range from an early count (1945) of 55 unused and 2-3 used to the 1998 Datz estimate of 150 unused, 3-5 used and a block of four intact. Our Levi records contain the intact block (4), reconstructed block (4), 64 unused singles and 6 used singles, for a total of 72 unused and 6 used. Many of the unused singles have disturbed gum or no gum, and/or are off center to top or top left. This Extremely Fine sound stamp with original gum is among the finest known examples.

Ex Drucker. With 1988 and 2002 P.F. certificates. Scott footnote states "Almost all unused copies of No. 295a have partial or disturbed gum. Values are for examples with full original gum that is slightly disturbed." The stamp offered here has fresh lightly-hinged gum.

$100,000
Spink Shreves Galleries US The Robert H. Cunliffe Collection of Spectacular Inverted Stamps of the United States and the World - June, 2009 1301 #65a, 1902 35k Dark violet and green, vertically laid paper, Center Inverted, a most attractive used example of this incredibly rare stamp, deep luxuriant colors and strong impressions on fresh paper, neat portion of a town c.d.s. dated 1910, overall very fine.This important rarity has not been offered on the auction market in years. It is likely that only two are known - if that "many" - and it is quite possible that it is unique. One of the great philatelic rarities of Russia, in addition to being one of the most important inverted center stamps of the world.We are confident that the catalog value quoted in Scott will prove to be entirely irrelevant when the auction hammer finally falls on the sale of this magnificent stamp, and a new catalog value will be established that more accurately reflects its true rarity; ex-Goss where it was described in the February 1958 sale catalog by Robson Lowe as "believed to be unique" (Michel #53yK; unpriced). $100,000
Matthew Bennett International Public Auction: U.S. and Canada - May 13-14, 2014 727 Canada, 1851, Queen Victoria, 12d black, laid paper (Unitrade 3), horizontal pair, ample to large margins to barely touching at the upper right, deep color, fine impression and light concentric ring cancels, faint crease, visible only in fluid. Exceptionally fresh and choice, Very Fine appearance. Scott 3 $280,000 as singles.
Unitrade C$450,000 as VF singles ($432,000)

A STUNNING USED PAIR OF THE ICONIC TWELVE PENCE, WIDELY CONSIDERED TO BE THE FINEST OF THE THREE RECORDED USED PAIRS.

Expertization: 1961 and 1984 P.F. Certificates, both no longer present. The 1984 certificate can be found on the P.F. website-certificate #132337.

Provenance: Adler, Cantor.

The Twelve Pence Black had an interesting history. Like all other pence issues of Canada it was engraved and printed by Rawdon, Wright, Hatch & Edson of New York. A total of 51,000 stamps and a proof imprint sheet were shipped to Canadian postal authorities on May 14, 1851. However, the stamp proved to be unpopular with the public and only saw limited distribution, with a total of only 1,510 stamps being sent to just 18 Post Offices. Of those, 60 were returned by the Ingersoll Post Office, leaving a mere 1,450 stamps sold. The remaining 49,490 stamps were destroyed on 1 May 1857.

There is some speculation as to why this stamp was inscribed "Twelve Pence" rather than the customary "One Shilling", especially since the Colonies of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia both used one shilling stamps. A possible explanation is that at the time the Canadian pound was depreciated relative to its British equivalent and the other provinces also had their own exchange rates. The result was confusion among the public and postal officials as to exactly what a "shilling" was worth. Expressing the value as "Twelve Pence" may have been an effort to alleviate this confusion.

The limited distribution and lack of acceptance by the consumer, who seems to have preferred to use a pair of the 6d Consort, has resulted in the 12d black being the most sought-after rarity in Canadian philately as well as one of the most coveted of all classic stamps.
Unitrade C$450,000 as VF singles ($432,000)
$100,000
H.R. Harmer, Inc. - Collections Sale 197 1978 SPECTACULAR WORLDWIDE COLLECTION, 1840-1935 a very valuable collection which embraces Regular, Semi-Postal, Postage Dues and Offical issues, plus a strong section of Cut-Squares and is housed in two black with gold lettering Scott custom albums. Strength in Classic 19th Century with some rare and very scarce issues throughout as well as later 19th & early 20th Century sets. We guesstimate there are 15,000-20,000 stamps present with about 50-50 mint, unused and used. To give a brief overview the collection includes mint or unused unless specified otherwise, with exceptional US including 1847 5c & 10c both used, 1875 Reproduction 5c & 10c, 1851-56 1c, 5c, 10c used, 12c used, 1857-61 5c (2), 10c, 12c, 30c, 1861-62 10c-24c, Grilled issues to 90c used, 1869 12c & 15c, 24c-90c used, 1870-71 to 90c mostly unused, 1887-88 to 90c, 1890-93 2c-90c, 1893 Columbus set,1894 $5, 1898 Trans-Miss set, Special Delivery & Parcel Post complete, some Departments & Confederate States, Offices in China 1919 to $2. Other notable Countries include Antigua complete to 1921 mint or used, Austria, Lombardy-Venetia, Barbados Britannia issues used, Belgium 1875 5fr used, 1886 2fr, Brazil mint or used, British East Africa, Bulgaria, Canada 1851-52 6d used, 1859-64 1c & 5c, 1897 Jubilee set, Provinces, Cape Of Good Hope 1853-64 1d, 4d (Buhler cert), 6f, Ceylon Imperf Pence issues with values to 2sh mint or used, Colombia mostly used including 1935 Barranquila set, strong States mint or used, Cuba mainly mint, Denmark 1864 Emblems 16s unused (signed Bloch), Falkland Islands 1898 2sh6d & 5sh,1912-15 to £1, Finland Serpentine & Arms issues, France very strong Classics mint or used, Germany with impressive Shield issues unused, 1900 Reichpost set to 5m, Great Britain QV mostly used including 1882-84 to 10sh, 1885 £1, 1888 £1 and 1891 £1, also mint 1887 to 1sh, KEVII to 5sh and 1929 PUC £1, some Officials, Greece quality large Hermes Heads including Paris Prints, Classic Hawaii, Iceland 1873-1901 Arms issues mostly mint, Italy mainly mint or unused, powerful States mint or used, Luxembourg, Netherlands 1864 5c-15c unused, 1893 2g50c, New Zealand mint or used, Obock 1894 to 50fr, Philippines, Romania, Somali Coast 1894 1fr on 5fr, Spain mint or used 1872-73 to 10p, 1873 to 4p, 1875 to 10p, 1930 Railway Congress set, Sweden 1918 55ore Pale Blue, 80re Black (signed), Postage Dues and Officials mint, Switzerland Classics and Imperf Seated Helvetia issues mostly used, 1914-30 Mountain set, and much more including German States, French & Portuguese Colonies, etc. The condition is a little varied, some forgeries and reprints present, also some certs or signed, but plenty is very fresh F-VF, OG, unused and used. Check the scans to give some idea of the depth of the really amazing collection. From the "Doheny" estate. $95,000
Spink Shreves Galleries US Floyd E. Risvold Collection - American Expansion & Journey West - January 27-29, 2010 452 Serra plans missions and mail service in Alta California in 1776 Junipero Serra. Rare Autograph Letter Signed Fr. Junipero Serra, in Spanish, 2 pages, legal folio, on laid paper, Presidio de San Diego, July 27, 1776. He responds to Captain Don $95,000
Spink Shreves Galleries US The November 2011 Collector's Series Sale - November 18-19, 2011 616 Yvert #6e, 1849 1Fr Light carmine on yellowish, tete-beche, a showpiece unused horizontal "face to face" tete-beche pair, featuring strikingly intense color on fresh paper, ample to mostly large margins all around, very fine.

This spectacular pair is widely regarded as one of the greatest 1849-50 Ceres issue tete-beche rarities extant, with only four unused examples recorded. It has graced several of the finest collections of classic French stamps ever formed. The inverted cliche comes only from position 35 from the first plate used to print the 1Fr value.

Illustrated in the 2000 Yvert Specialized and 2003 Yvert catalogs. Signed Bernard and Pascal Behr, Aime and Jean-Francois Brun, Calves, Goebel and Roumet, as well as being accompanied by 2003 Behr, Brun and Goebel certificates; ex-Ferrary, Hind, "Lafayette" and Gross (Scott #9a; $235,000.00).

$95,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Alan Geisler Collection of U.S. and Possessions Stamps - February 26, 2007 406 2c Harding, Rotary, Perf 11 (613). Well-centered with unusually wide margins for this rotary waste issue, sharp impression, bold machine cancel. FRESH AND VERY FINE. A RARE SOUND EXAMPLE OF THE 2-CENT HARDING ROTARY PERF 11.

$92,500
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. Coulter 1869 Pictorial - May 12, 2006 51 30c Ultramarine & Carmine, Center Inverted (121b). Absolutely perfect centering with wide balanced margins all around, sharp and lightly inked strike of Leaf cancel of New York, bright colors on fresh paper, essentially sound, for the sake of $90,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Alan B. Whitman Collection, Part Two: 1870-1901 Issues - April 14-15, 2009 365 2c Pan-American, Center Inverted (295a). Original gum, h.r., superbly centered with wide balanced margins, bright colors and clear impressions of vignette and frame

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. ONE OF THE FINEST ORIGINAL-GUM EXAMPLES OF THE 2-CENT PAN-AMERICAN INVERT. THIS MARVELOUS STAMP HAS BEEN AWARDED THE GRADE OF XF 90 BY P.S.E.

The 2c is the rarest of the three Pan-American Inverts. It is surmised that approximately 200 were issued through the post office, with two distinct shades known. Estimates of surviving examples range from an early count (1945) of 55 unused and 2-3 used to the 1998 Datz estimate of 150 unused, 3-5 used and a block of four intact. Our Levi records contain the intact block offered in this sale (4), a reconstructed block offered in our Zoellner sale (4), 64 unused singles and 6 used singles, for a total of 72 unused and 6 used. Many of the unused singles have disturbed gum or no gum, and/or are off center to top or top left.

With 1976 and 1993 P.F. certificates and 2008 P.S.E. certificate (OGh, XF 90). The Scott Catalogue value is for a stamp with slightly disturbed gum.

$90,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals - March 28, 2012 1087 New Orleans La., 5c Brown on White (62X3). First Printing, Positions 39-40 from the bottom right corner of the sheet, full to large margins including huge part of right sheet margin, vertical crease between stamps and slight gum staining, tied by "New Orleans La. (15?) Jun." (1861) circular datestamp, used with United States 3c Dull Red, Ty. III (26), slightly rounded corner, tied by pencil lines on blue part-printed notice from Octave de Armas, a prominent notary public in New Orleans, dated June 14, 1861, and addressed to James Lester in Eddyville, Kentucky, received at Louisville between June 17 and 25, released on June 25 without Louisville datestamp, full clear strike of "SOUTHN. LETTER UNPAID" two-line handstamp in blue with matching "DUE 3" straightline tying 5c pair, tiny hole in address panel just above the last letter of "Eddyville"

VERY FINE. A MAGNIFICENT "SOUTHERN LETTER UNPAID" COVER FRANKED WITH A COMBINATION OF THE NEW ORLEANS POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL -- USED WITHIN THE FIRST WEEK OF ISSUE -- AND THE UNITED STATES 3-CENT 1857 ISSUE, WHICH WAS REJECTED BY THE LOUISVILLE POST OFFICE. ONLY ONE OTHER SUCH COMBINATION IS RECORDED, AND THIS IS THE FINER OF THE TWO. AN IMPORTANT POSTAL HISTORY ARTIFACT FROM SEVERAL PERSPECTIVES.

This folded notice of Protest was dated June 14, 1861, by the notary public in New Orleans, Octave de Armas, and mailed to James Lester in Eddyville, Kentucky. It was probably postmarked at the New Orleans post office on the following day (June 15), but this type of circular datestamp (with large serif letters) is often difficult to read, in this instance, the day of the month is illegible. By the time this letter reached Nashville on or about June 17, the U.S. mail agent had already been withdrawn from the route between Nashville and Louisville (the last regular mail run was on June 12). On June 15, the Nashville postmaster, W. D. McNish, started to forward mail to Louisville by using the American Letter Express Company, who brought the mails across the lines and deposited them in the Louisville post office. This letter was among the first group of mail forwarded by express under this unusual arrangement.

Starting June 13, the Louisville postmaster, Dr. John J. Speed, decided to hold the northbound mail received from Nashville, rather than divert it to the U.S. Dead Letter Office. Speed sent a request to Washington D.C. for instructions on how to handle the mail that was rapidly accumulating. When this letter arrived in Louisville on June 19, it was held until Postmaster Speed received instructions from the U.S. Post Office Department, which were wired on June 24, advising him to "forward letters from the South for the loyal states as unpaid after removing postage stamps..." Since it was impractical to remove stamps from all of the letters (although apparently that was attempted at first), Postmaster Speed created the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking to explain to the addressees that the U.S. stamps applied by the senders were invalid for postage. The first group of mail to be released with the "Southn. Letter Unpaid" marking was actually the mail received at Louisville by private express between June 17 and 25, which included the cover offered here. This group was released on June 25, but none of these letters was postmarked with the Louisville datestamp.

There are 29 "Southn. Letter Unpaid" covers recorded in the Special Routes book (No. 25 has been deleted as a fake since publication), only two of which have a Southern Postmaster's Provisional stamps (both New Orleans). There is one other New Orleans provisional cover known that was addressed to Louisville, carried by American Letter Express from Nashville, but it bears only the "Due 3" marking and was not marked "Southn. Letter Unpaid" because it was delivered locally in Louisville.

Special Routes Census No. SLU-14. Illustrated in National Philatelic Museum 1857 Perforation Centennial book and Special Routes (p. 17). Ex Worthington, Caspary, Lightner, Matz, Haas, Ishikawa and Walske. With 2010 P.F. certificate

$90,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Frelinghuysen Collection, Part One - March 28, 2012 85 New York N.Y., 5c Black, "AC M" Initials (9X1a). Positions 32-35, horizontal strip of four, margins completely clear all around, file fold thru right stamp, second stamp from left has small scrape touched up with pencil, tied by blue pen cancel with matching "20" for double 10c over-300 miles rate, red "New-York Jun. 2 (1846)" circular datestamp with matching "Paid" arc handstamp on blue folded cover to Marietta O., sender's manuscript "Paid" notation at top left, docketing on side flap

VERY FINE. ONE OF FOUR RECORDED COVERS BEARING A STRIP OF FOUR OF THE 5-CENT NEW YORK POSTMASTER'S PROVISIONAL. THIS OUTSTANDING COVER HAS NOT BEEN SEEN PUBLICLY SINCE 1936.

In his outstanding series of Chronicle articles on the New York Postmaster's Provisional, Philip T. Wall offered his opinion on the five most outstanding New York covers (Chronicle 107, pp. 153-155). In addition to the famous Hasbrouck cover with a block of nine and a strip of three, and the cover front with a pair of stamps initialed "MMJr", Wall selected the three covers with strips of four that were known to him to still exist. This cover, the fourth known with a strip of four, was pictured in another Wall article (Chronicle 111, p. 153), but its whereabouts was unknown at the time. It is one of three ex-Lapham rarities described by Wall as "phantoms," which, unbeknownst to him, were residing in the Frelinghuysen collection.

Henry G. Lapham displayed this cover in his exhibit of New York provisionals at the 1926 New York exhibition and at the Collectors Club of New York in April 1928. Henry's son Raymond included this cover in his Grand Award exhibit at the 1936 TIPEX exhibition. After Henry's death in 1939, Frelinghuysen acquired the cover, along with other rare provisionals, when Warren H. Colson sold portions of the Lapham collection privately.

There are four known New York Postmaster's Provisional covers with strips of four, as follows in order of use: 1) Positions 31-34, New York Oct. (1845) circular datestamp, used to Cincinnati O., double 10c rate, ex Hart, Klep, Chafee and Jaretzky, 2) Positions 6-9, New York March 17 (1846) circular datestamp, used to Geneva N.Y., double 10c rate, ex Grunin and Zoellner, 3) Positions 32-35, New York Jun. 2 (1846) circular datestamp, used to Marietta O., double 10c rate, ex Lapham, the cover offered here, and 4) Positions 37-40, New York Sep. 13 (1846) circular datestamp, used to Fort Wayne Ind., double 10c rate, ex Seybold, Hart and Gibson.

Ex Lapham.

$90,000
Shreves Philatelic Galleries, Inc. The William H. Gross Collection of Great Britain Line Engraved Postage Stamps 1840-1841 - June 11, 2007 18
LB-MJ, Plate 3, the incredible block of eighteen, intense color and sharp impressions on bright paper, mostly with margins but touched in places and some creasing, neat red Maltese Cross cancellations, overall in a very fine state
$85,000
Shreves Philatelic Galleries, Inc. The William H. Gross Collection of Great Britain Important Postage Stamps 1847-1929 - June 11, 2007 226 S.G. #5/512, D1-39, O3/103, The comprehensive and valuable balance of the William H. Gross Collection of Great Britain, approximately 550 different items, mostly singles and, with the exception of one stamp, all are mint, all neatly displayed $85,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Alan B. Whitman Collection, Part Two: 1870-1901 Issues - April 14-15, 2009 183 90c Carmine, Grill (144). H. Grill, original gum, clearly-defined grill points clearly visible on face of stamp, intense shade and impression

EXTREMELY FINE. AN EXCEEDINGLY RARE ORIGINAL-GUM EXAMPLE OF THE 1870 90-CENT GRILLED NATIONAL BANK NOTE ISSUE. THE 90-CENT IS THE THIRD MOST DIFFICULT OF THE NATIONAL BANK NOTE GRILLED ISSUES TO OBTAIN IN ORIGINAL-GUM CONDITION.

Considering original-gum examples only, after the extremely rare 12c and non-existent 24c, the 90c is the rarest of the 1870 National Grilled Issue. As a point of reference, the P.S.E. Population Report lists only two OG examples: one Mint N.H. stamp at VF 80 and one OGph stamp at 20(!).

Ex Argentum (where it realized $32,500 hammer in our 1999 auction). With 1984 and 1999 P.F. certificates

$85,000
Shreves Philatelic Galleries, Inc. The William H. Gross Collection of Great Britain Line Engraved Postage Stamps 1840-1841 - June 11, 2007 4 BF, Plate 1a, an exceptionally well margined single tied to 1840 (May 6) folded letter from London to Paisley by two strikes of red Maltese Cross cancels, dated in manuscript on reverse "London 6 May 1840" $80,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The New Helvetia Collection of Western Expresses - June 24, 2014 37 Pony Express, St. Joseph, Jun. 3 (1860). Full clear strike of Running Pony oval datestamp on cover with free frank "Milton S. Latham U.S.S." and addressed in his hand to General James W. Denver, care of Frank Denver in Sacramento, Latham's directive "Per Pony Express" along left edge, blue crayon "Free" above oval and pencil "Free I.A.M." at right, lightened stain and minor cosmetic improvements (no paper addition or repair)

VERY FINE. ONE OF FOUR RECORDED WESTBOUND PONY EXPRESS COVERS DELAYED DUE TO THE PAIUTE INDIAN WAR IN 1860, OF WHICH TWO HAVE FREE FRANKS.

As recently documented in The Impact of Indian Attacks on the Pony Express in 1860 (published by our firm and available on our website at LINK), even when service in California and Nevada was suspended from June 1 to July 6, 1860, the Pony Express continued to run horses in both directions on a shortened route between St. Joseph and Ruby Valley. The westbound mail addressed to California that left St. Joseph on May 20, May 27, June 3 and June 10 (all Sunday departures) was carried as far west as possible and held until a military escort could accompany the riders beyond the dangerous part of the route. Five covers are recorded with these departure dates, one of which also left on June 3, but was delivered to a military offer at Camp Floyd near Salt Lake City.

The westbound trip departing from St. Joseph on Sunday, June 10, was the last scheduled Sunday departure, and it made it through to California after catching up with the three earlier mails. The Mountaineer 6/16/1860 reports the arrival of an express from the East in Salt Lake City at 8 p.m. on June 15, which fits with the June 10 departure. The Daily Alta California 6/24/1860 contains a report from Carson City dated June 23, which states, "The long missing Pony Express arrived at Carson City last evening, bringing dates from St. Louis to June 10th." The San Francisco Bulletin 6/25/1860 reported The Pony Express will arrive here to-night about 10 o’clock, on board the Sacramento steamer. The Express will bring four several letter-bags -- the number now due -- and will have altogether 300 letters, at least" (boldface added for emphasis). This report confirms that the four delayed express mails -- May 20, May 27, June 3 and June 10 -- arrived in San Francisco on June 25.

How did the express with the four mails, including the cover offered here, travel to Carson City? The military escort of "20 picked men, well armed and mounted," which guarded the May 25 eastbound mail through hostile territory after they left Carson City on June 9, passed through Roberts' Creek on June 15, as reported by an army private named Charles A. Scott in his journal. The convoy moved at a rate of approximately 40 miles per day, obviously a much slower pace than an individual Pony rider could achieve. The timing strongly indicates that the westbound mail, which had accumulated in the safe zone for weeks, was carried to Carson City with the same military escort on its return trip. The westbound express reached Carson City during the evening of June 22 (Daily Alta California 6/24/1860). Six days of travel points to a June 16 or 17 departure from somewhere near Ruby Valley, where the 4th Artillery had set up their base of operations.

Senator Milton S. Latham went to California in 1850 and was elected to Congress on the 1852 Democratic ticket. After his term expired, he declined to run for re-election and served as collector for the port of San Francisco. In 1859 he was elected governor, but he resigned five days after taking office to fill the U.S. Senate seat left vacant when Senator David C. Broderick was killed in a duel. It was during his term as a U.S. senator that Latham franked this cover addressed to his friend and fellow Democrat, General James W. Denver, who was the former territorial governor of Kansas, state senator and U.S. congressman, and who would be commissioned as a general in the Union army at the start of the Civil War.

Senator Latham was a friend of William H. Russell, the Central Overland California & Pike’s Peak Express Co. president, and a strong supporter of COC&PP in their effort to secure the contract for the Central Route. He was among the few individuals later permitted to send Pony Express letters free of charge. In this case Senator Latham’s free frank applied to the $5.00 Pony Express rate and U.S. postage. There are 15 recorded Pony Express covers with any form of free frank for postage or express charges. Of these, six are signed by Latham (FKW E94, W3, W5, W7, W48 and W62). The eastbound cover (E94) has the San Francisco Running Pony oval. Three of the westbound Latham covers have the St. Joseph Running Pony oval (W3, W5 and W7), and two have the oval within circle datestamp (W48 and W62). The cover offered here is one of two recorded Latham free-franked covers delayed by the Paiute Indian War (the other is dated May 27, FKW W5).

FKW Census W6. Ex Salzer, Vogel, Walske and Stach

$80,000

***New to this List***

Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Alan Geisler Collection of U.S. and Possessions Stamps - February 26, 2007 120 90c Blue, F. Grill (101). Original gum, lightly hinged, intense shade and proof-like impression, well-defined grill, choice centering. VERY FINE AND CHOICE. EASILY ONE OF THE FINEST ORIGINAL-GUM EXAMPLES OF THE 1868 90-CENT F GRILL. $77,500
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals - March 28, 2012 1021 Charleston S.C., 10c Blue on Dark Orange entire (16XU6). Woodcut press-printed provisional at upper right corner of envelope, bold "Charleston S.C. Jul. 11, 186-" circular datestamp (1862 with blank fourth digit), addressed to Mr. A. O. Norris at Anderson C.H. S.C., receipt docketing "Written to & money sent the 14 July 1862" and "from J. H. Johnson", additional docketing in the same hand on back "Check 500/Cash 100/600 14 July 1862"

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS IS THE UNIQUE CHARLESTON 10-CENT PRESS-PRINTED PALMETTO TREE PROVISIONAL ENVELOPE, USED DURING A SHORTAGE OF CONFEDERATE GENERAL ISSUES.

After graduation from Princeton University, Alfred Huger returned to Charleston to run his plantation. Huger received his postmaster appointment from President Andrew Jackson on December 19, 1834, and he served until Federal occupation in February 1865. Huger was postmaster in July 1835 when sacks of mail containing abolitionist literature from the North were burned by a pro-slavery mob. After the war Huger declined President Andrew Johnson's offer of reappointment as a U.S. postmaster.

Huger issued press-printed typographic provisional envelopes in the summer of 1861, probably close to the earliest known date of August 16 (Calhoun census). The lithographed adhesive provisional stamp followed in early September 1861. Lithography was used by only three postmasters to print provisional stamps (Charleston, Livingston and Mobile). The first supply of Confederate General Issue stamps was placed on sale on December 7, 1861, and the provisionals were withdrawn from sale. However, provisionals purchased by the public prior to withdrawal continued to be used concurrently with the General Issues. In June and July 1862 the Charleston post office ran short of General Issue stamps, and provisionals were re-released. The latest recorded use of a Charleston provisional is dated August 5, 1862, with a mixed franking of the 5c De La Rue Print (Scott 6) and 5c adhesive (Richard L. Calhoun, "Inventory of Charleston, South Carolina, Postmaster Provisionals," Confederate Philatelist, Jan.-Feb. 1989).

It is reported that the stamps and envelopes were printed by the large Charleston-based printing firm of Evans and Cogswell. According to http://www.csa-scla.org : "...Evans & Cogswell Printing Company was retained as printers to the Secession Convention, and daily printed the minutes of the Convention in S.C., and printed the documents that communicated the secession to the other Southern States. The Ordinance of Secession, one of the most fateful and fatal documents in America's history, was lithographed by Evans & Cogswell. During the War Between the States, Evans and Cogswell printed small denomination currency, Government bonds, the Soldier's Prayer Book, books on war tactics, stamps, and medical books for the Confederacy."

This Palmetto Tree design is unique among Southern Postmasters' Provisionals. On this entire -- the sole surviving example -- the woodcut is printed in dark blue, identical in shade and impression to the 5c provisional envelope stamp issued in August 1861. The circular datestamp is struck at the center of the upper half of the entire. Charleston did not have a separate cancelling device and used the datestamp to cancel adhesive stamps, therefore, the position of the complete datestamp on this entire confirms the presence of the printed provisional at upper right and precludes the removal of an adhesive stamp from the envelope.

The first Charleston provisionals were the press-printed 5c envelopes issued in August 1861 and used consistently until the estimated 5,000 prepared were sold out in November 1861 (dates range from August 16 to November 12, 1861). Approximately 25,000 5c adhesive stamps were produced and placed on sale as early as September 1861 (earliest recorded date is September 4). Both provisionals were used concurrently with the handstamped "Paid" markings, but the surcharge on the price of provisionals made the stamps and envelopes less popular with the public. When the General Issues were finally received and put on sale on December 7, 1861, the large number of 5c provisionals still on hand was withdrawn, although they remained valid for prepayment.

In June 1862 the supply of 5c General Issues available at the Charleston post office was running low, and Postmaster Huger authorized the renewed sale of provisionals. More than a dozen examples of the 5c provisional stamp are known used in the months of June, July and August 1862. The handstamped "Paid" marking was also used again briefly in June 1862 after having been previously retired in December 1861. The rate increase from 5c to 10c for any distance became effective July 1, 1862, during this shortage of General Issues. Charleston covers are recorded in early July 1862 with the 5c Blue Lithograph and 10c Rose Lithograph stamps, but these are scarce, indicating that only a small supply of the newer General Issues was available. Further evidence of the shortage is an August 5, 1862, cover with a combination of the 5c De La Rue stamp and 5c provisional for the 10c rate. A supply of press-printed 10c envelopes from an earlier printing was probably released in anticipation of the July 1862 rate change and in response to the shortage of General Issues. The provisional envelope's great rarity is probably due to the arrival of 10c Rose stamps in July 1862, which are found on covers dated July 3, 4, 5 and continuing on with frequency until replaced by the De La Rue and Richmond 5c printings.

This unique example of the 10c Palmetto Tree entire was discovered by the late Dr. Don Preston Peters of Lynchburg, Virginia, in an original correspondence to A. O. Norris at Anderson Court House, South Carolina. Norris was a newspaper publisher and, after the war, a probate judge. The receipt docketing indicates that the sender was J. H. Johnson. There was an ordnance sergeant with the 10th South Carolina Infantry Regiment named J. H. Johnson, who might be the same person.

We regard this entire as one of the most important and distinctive of all Southern Postmasters' Provisionals, by virtue of its extreme rarity, the distinctive Palmetto Tree design, and as one of the few 10c provisionals issued east of the Mississippi.

Ex Dr. Peters, Heathcote, Dr. Graves and Birkinbine. With Ashbrook letter

$70,000
Spink Shreves Galleries US The Robert H. Cunliffe Collection of Spectacular Inverted Stamps of the United States and the World - June, 2009 41 #1610c, $1.00 Rush Lamp and Candle Holder, Intaglio Brown Inverted, the spectacular and unique top left corner sheet-margin "Use Correct Zip Code" block of four of the so-called "C.I.A." Invert, wonderfully fresh and bright, unblemished o.g., never hinged, very fine and choice.This is the sole surviving inscription multiple from the unique error sheet of 100. The plate block that once existed when the sheet was originally intact is where the five missing stamps were removed from the sheet, and whose whereabouts are unknown.A rare opportunity to acquire one of the most famous and important Invert multiples in United States philately. $67,500
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The D.K. Collection of Southern Postmasters' Provisionals - March 28, 2012 1072 Nashville Tenn., 10c Green (61X6). Two huge margins, framelines touched at top and right, deep shade, scissors-cut at top left, tied by blue "Adams Express Co. Nashville Aug. 1" oval datestamp on United States 3c Red on White Star Die entire (U26) to Rev. A. J. Leavenworth in Petersburg Va., "Adams Ex. Co. * Louisville, Ky. * Jul. 30, 1861" circular datestamp cancels 3c embossed stamp, small red manuscript "2" express charge (two bits, or 25c), blue "10" handstamp applied at Petersburg to indicate postage due (presumably the letter was over the half-ounce weight limit), receipt docketing "Prof. Agnew & Sundry others", small part of backflap removed, light soiling and edgewear (slight improvement at top right corner)

VERY FINE. ONE OF THREE RECORDED ADAMS EXPRESS COMPANY COVERS WITH THE NASHVILLE 10-CENT PROVISIONAL, OF WHICH ONLY TWO ARE MIXED FRANKINGS WITH UNITED STATES POSTAGE. AN OUTSTANDING COVER THAT COMBINES THE RAREST ELEMENTS OF PHILATELY AND POSTAL HISTORY.

Adams Express Company was required to ensure the prepayment of government postage (Federal and Confederate), although the letter was carried outside the regular mails. Very few covers are recorded with Confederate provisional stamps or markings used in conjunction with across-the-lines express service. This group includes the provisionals of Atlanta (handstamp), Houston (handstamp), Lynchburg (press-printed entire), Memphis (adhesive), Mobile (adhesive), Montgomery (handstamp), Nashville (adhesive and handstamp) and New Orleans (adhesive).

Only three across-the-lines express covers are recorded with the Nashville 10c adhesive provisional (Special Routes Census Nos. S-AD-44, 45 and 46), all dated at Nashville on August 1. Only two of the 10c covers are mixed frankings (the third is used alone). These two Nashville 10c mixed-franking covers carried by Adams, both North-to-South usages, are the only 10c adhesive Confederate provisionals known in combination with United States postage. As such, they are quite significant artifacts from this remarkable period of postal history.

Our records contain six genuine covers with the Nashville 10c Green provisional: 1) Tied by Aug. 1 (1861) Adams Express oval, to Hardy & Bros., Norfolk Va., 2) Tied by Sep. 15, 1861, Nashville datestamp, to Shelbyville Tenn., ex Caspary, 3) 5c & 10c used together, tied by Aug. 21, 1861, Nashville datestamp, to D. Cleage, Athens Tenn., ex Caspary, Lightner, Graves and Boshwit, 4) Tied by Aug. 1 (1861) Adams Express oval, used on 3c Star Die entire to Rev. Leavenworth, Petersburg Va., ex Kilbourne and Walske, the cover offered here, 5) Tied by Aug. 1 (1861) Adams Express oval, used on 3c Star Die with additional 3c 1857, to Albert F. Ryan, Norfolk Va., ex Gallagher, and 6) Tied by "10" rate handstamp, Sep. 18, 1861, Nashville datestamp, on building corner card cover to Thos. H. Caldwell, Shelbyville Tenn., ex Needham, Kimmel, Haas and Rudy.

The addressee, Reverend Abner Johnson Leavenworth, was at this time the principal and proprietor of the Leavenworth Academy and Collegiate Seminary for Young Ladies.

Special Routes Census No. S-AD-46 (illustrated on p. 55). Illustrated in Shenfield book (p. 23). Ex Antrim (acquired by the Kilbournes in 1958), Kilbourne, Kramer and Walske. With 1999 P.F. certificate

$67,500
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. 2012 Rarities of the World - June 26, 2012 182 $2.00 Columbian (242). Mint N.H., deep rich color and sharp proof-like impression, perfectly centered with wide and balanced margins for this difficult stamp, fully-formed perforations all around

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. A MAGNIFICENT MINT NEVER-HINGED EXAMPLE OF THE $2.00 COLUMBIAN ISSUE. THIS STUNNING STAMP HAS ACHIEVED THE GRADE OF XF-SUPERB 95 FROM P.S.E., WHICH IS THE HIGHEST GRADE AWARDED TO ANY $2.00 COLUMBIAN, AND ONLY THREE HAVE RECEIVED IT.

Typically, when a collector assembles an Extremely Fine, Mint Never-Hinged set of Columbians, the $2.00 space remains empty to the very end due to the low supply and high demand. It is simply one of the rarest stamps of the set in this condition.

Ex Scarsdale. 1975 and 1999 P.F. certificates no longer accompany. With 2012 P.S.E. certificate (XF-Superb 95, SMQ $50,000.00). This is the highest grade awarded to date and only two others share this grade.

$67,500
H.R. Harmer, Inc. - Single Stamps & Postal History Sale 2982 903 #482A, 2c Deep rose imperforate, Ty. 1a, Schermack Ty. III perforations, a wonderful used example of this most sought-after 20th century rarity, featuring Schermack perforations on both the left and the right, being one of the very few copies that can claim this important and desirable characteristic, plus, quite remarkably, these perforations are well clear of the design on both sides, a quality that further enhances its desirability, in addition, its bottom margin is close but clear of the design, rich distinctive color on clean fresh paper, small corner margin crease at top right, Fine appearance, a stamp that is missing from even the most advanced collections of United States stamps, 1982 P.F. certificate. Scott #482A was issued imperforate by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and sold to the Schermack Company for use in their patented stamp-affixing machines, these stamp dispensing and affixing machines applied the stamps one at a time, often slicing the stamps not on the hyphen-hole perforations as intended, but typically well into the design and most often cutting off the perforations on one side, to date a mere 32 single have been recorded, this being Siegel census #482A-CAN-24. $65,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. Siegel Sale 1000 - December 8, 2010 1144 $5.00 Columbian (245). Mint N.H., perfectly centered with massive margins evenly framing design, intense shade and proof-like impression on brilliant white paper, long full perforations

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. THIS IS ONE OF THE FINEST MINT NEVER-HINGED EXAMPLES OF THE $5.00 COLUMBIAN ISSUE IN EXISETNCE. THIS PHENOMENAL STAMP HAS BEEN AWARDED THE GRADE OF XF-SUPERB 95 BY P.S.E. -- THIS IS THE HIGHEST GRADE AWARDED TO DATE AND ONE OF ONLY THREE TO ACHIEVE THIS GRADE.

The $5.00 Columbian features a portrait of Columbus which was taken from the design of a contemporary medal cast in Madrid. A 50-cent coin was also minted for the Columbian Exposition based on the original medal, and the stamp's design was taken from this twice-removed design.

For many collectors, acquisition of the $5.00 Columbian represents the ultimate achievement in classic philately. When issued in 1893, this was the highest denomination and first $5.00 United States stamp. The high total face value of the dollar value Columbians represented a very significant expense to collectors and therefore sales were slow. A total of 21,844 were issued.

We could not begin to count the number of $5.00 Columbian stamps sold by the Siegel firm over 80 years. However, the number of Extremely Fine, Mint Never Hinged, examples is very limited. Due to the high face value multiples are very rare. For much of philatelic history stamps were hinged into albums. This fact, plus the lack of multiples, explains the scarcity of Mint N.H. copies. The stamp offered here is certainly a contender for the top position of any we have ever encountered.

With 2010 P.S.E. certificate (XF-Superb 95, SMQ $87,900.00). This is the highest grade awarded to date and only two others share this grade. The next-highest grade awarded to a Mint N.H. example is a 90 (one copy) and then an 80 (three copies).

$65,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. Siegel Sale 1000 - December 8, 2010 1065 The Incomparable "Quartet" of Lincoln Covers. Four of the most outstanding Lincoln-related illustrated covers extant, assembled for the first time. The four covers represent different aspects of the martyred president's role in American history.

First, there is the 1860 campaign, represented by a cover with the famous "split rail fence" design and portrait of a beardless Lincoln, used from Chicago and stamped with 3c postage and the extremely rare Floyd's Penny Post 1c Brown (68L2).

Second, there is the familiar portrait of a bearded Lincoln as president, represented by the only known engraved printing on an envelope, of which this one example is recorded.

Third, from the other side of the war we have the famous Confederate "Hanging Lincoln" cartoon, showing the president hanging upside down from a tree limb, with his symbolic axe and fence rail tied around his neck, of which twelve examples are recorded.

Fourth, there is the envelope distributed in the days immediately following Lincoln's assassination, which shows a portrait of John Wilkes Booth with a caption that begins "Hunt the villain down" -- the only envelope design depicting the assassin Booth, of which just two examples are recorded.

EXTREMELY FINE. THIS "QUARTET" OF LINCOLN COVERS STANDS ON ITS OWN AS THE MOST OUTSTANDING GROUP OF ITS KIND EVER ASSEMBLED, OR IT COULD PROVIDE THE KEYSTONE TO AN EXPANDED COLLECTION OF LINCOLN-RELATED COVERS, WHICH WILL UNDOUBTEDLY HAVE SPECIAL RELEVANCE AS THE NATION COMMEMORATES THE 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE CIVIL WAR IN 2011.

$65,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. Outstanding United States Stamps - October 12-14, 2011 1372 30c Black, I. Grill (143 var). Clear grill points at upper left, from the early state of the I Grill which shows the unmistakable characteristics of this grill type, original gum, bright color

FRESH AND FINE. THIS IS A NEWLY-DISCOVERED 1870 30-CENT NATIONAL BANK NOTE COMPANY ISSUE WITH THE I GRILL. AS SUCH, IT IS UNIQUE AND MAY ONE DAY BE A KEY TO A COMPLETE COLLECTION OF UNITED STATES STAMPS.

At least two sizes of grills were used by the National Bank Note Company for the 1870 Issue. They are identified by Scott Catalogue by a notation prior to Scott 134, which assigns them the letters H and I. However, to date they have not been separately catalogued, as have the different grills used in 1867 and 1868 (A, B, C, D, Z, E and F Grills). The G Grill was used on the 1869 Pictorial Issue.

The H Grill is larger than the I Grill, measuring approximately 11-13 points wide by 14-16 points tall when the full dimensions are visible. It is found on all values from the 1c thru the 90c. The I Grill measures from 9-11 points wide by 10-13 points tall. It is often a stronger grill impression (though many times incomplete). Students also distinguish between early and late states of the grilling device. The sizes of the grills remained the same in both states, but the characteristics of the grill points changed in different ways as the device wore away. The early state I Grill, as in the stamp offered here, has a very distinct shape to the grill points.

In 2004 we started to distinguish between the H and I Grills in our catalogue descriptions and research, in an effort to establish relative scarcity. The 1c thru 7c makes up the bulk of the population of the I Grill, but it is also known on the 10c (approximately a dozen used known), 12c (one confirmed unused copy offered here and another reported unused example), 15c (3 unused and 11 used known) and the 90c (3 used known). The recently-discovered 30c I Grill -- the listing copy offered here -- fills in a gap, leaving only the 24c value to be discovered with the I Grill.

If the Scott Catalogue editors were to be consistent in their listing policy of grills across all issues, then they would separate the H and I Grills into major catalogue numbers, as they do for the 1867-68 Grilled Issue. If this were to occur, then the rare Bank Note I Grills would take their place alongside other grilled-stamp rarities such as Nos. 80, 81, 82, 85A, 85D and 85F.

With 2011 P.F. certificate. Accompanied by photographs with notes from Ronald A. Burns, one of the foremost authorities on the Bank Note grills. Scott Retail as normal grill, with no premium for the I Grill.

$65,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. 2012 Rarities of the World - June 26, 2012 215 4c Orange Brown, Bluish (360). Block of four, lightly hinged, bright shade on nicely blued paper

FINE-VERY FINE. AN EXTREMELY RARE BLOCK OF FOUR -- THE LARGEST RECORDED MULTIPLE OF THE 4-CENT ON BLUISH PAPER. THIS IS THE FIRST BLOCK WE HAVE OFFERED IN DECADES. ONE OF THE RAREST OF ALL 20TH CENTURY MULTIPLES.

During the early stages of production of the 1908-09 Washington-Franklin stamps, the Bureau tried to solve the problem of paper shrinkage that caused off-center perforations and resulted in a large number of unusable sheets. Armstrong notes that up to twenty percent of sheets had to be discarded. The first such experiments resulted in the Bluish Paper stamps (Scott 357-366). Rag cloth was added to the wood pulp mixture, but this did not have the desired effect and the experiment was discontinued.

According to Johl (Vol. 1, page 175), the only source of the 4c and 8c Bluish stamps was the archives of the Post Office Department. Approximately 80 of each were traded for rare stamps missing from the archives. Given the failed experimental nature of the paper mixture, it is no surprise that virtually all copies are off-center to some extent.

Our Levi records contain a half-dozen blocks of four (none larger), but several of these may have been broken up -- the Levi records on three are from the 1950's and 1960's.

Ex "Country Gentleman" (Siegel Sale 422, November 29, 1972) and offered to the market for the first time since that sale. With unfolded 1973 P.F. certificate.

$65,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. United States Rarities - October 17, 2006 18 10c Black, Double Transfer Ty. A (2-A). Position 1R1, original gum, typically of Rawdon, Wright, Hatch and Edson the gum is thinly applied, but it covers the entire surface (described on accompanying certificate as "part original gum") $62,500
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Jay Hoffman Collection of United States Stamps - May 8-9, 2008 288 4c Pan-American, Center Inverted (296a). Beautiful colors, usual slightly disturbed original gum, unusually well-centered and fresh

VERY FINE AND CHOICE EXAMPLE OF THE 4-CENT PAN-AMERICAN INVERT. SCARCE IN SUCH PRISTINE CONDITION.

The 4c Pan-American Invert was a special printing and not regularly issued. Examples were distributed through two official channels, and the gum on the majority of stamps without "Specimen" overprint was disturbed. In fact, because the stamps were removed from mounting paper, they are generally thinned or have seriously disturbed gum.

With 2005 P.S.E. certificate

$62,500
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. Siegel Sale 1000 - December 8, 2010 1167 2c Pan-American, Center Inverted (295a). Full and absolutely pristine original gum which has just one hinge mark at top, radiant colors as fresh as the day they were printed, choice centering with wide and balanced margins

EXTREMELY FINE. A STUNNING STAMP AND ONE OF THE FINEST ORIGINAL-GUM EXAMPLES OF THE 2-CENT PAN-AMERICAN INVERT.

The 2c is the rarest of the three Pan-American Inverts. It is surmised that approximately 200 were issued through the post office, with two distinct shades known. Estimates of surviving examples range from an early count (1945) of 55 unused and 2-3 used to the 1998 Datz estimate of 150 unused, 3-5 used and a block of four intact. Our Levi records contain the intact block (4), reconstructed block (4), 64 unused singles and 6 used singles, for a total of 72 unused and 6 used. Many of the unused singles have disturbed gum or no gum, and/or are off center to top or top left. This Extremely Fine sound stamp with original gum is among the finest known examples.

Ex Newport. With 1973 and 2007 P.F. certificates

$62,500
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. 2012 Rarities of the World - June 26, 2012 188 $4.00 Columbian (244). Mint N.H., brilliant color as fresh as the day it was printed, bright paper, gorgeous centering with wide balanced margins, long and full perforations

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. AN ABSOLUTELY STUNNING MINT NEVER-HINGED EXAMPLE OF THE $4.00 COLUMBIAN, WHICH HAS BEEN GRADED XF-SUPERB 95 BY P.S.E. -- THIS IS THE HIGHEST GRADE AWARDED TO DATE.

With 2012 P.S.E. certificate (XF-Superb 95, SMQ $51,500.00). This is the highest grade awarded to date and only two others share this desirable grade. As another indication of rarity, this is the first time we have offered a Mint N.H. stamp in this grade.

$62,500
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Jay Hoffman Collection of United States Stamps - May 8-9, 2008 192 10c Deep Brown, Special Printing (197). Without gum as issued, deep rich color and sharp proof-like impression, beautiful centering with wide margins

VERY FINE AND CHOICE. A MAGNIFICENT EXAMPLE OF THE EXCEEDINGLY RARE 10-CENT 1880 AMERICAN BANK NOTE SPECIAL PRINTING.

Our recently updated census of Scott 197 contains only 30 examples certified as genuine by the Philatelic Foundation. Of these, seven have faults, leaving only 23 sound or potentially sound examples (some have not been examined in many years).

With 1954, 1992 and 2004 P.F. certificates

$57,500
Spink Shreves Galleries US The Robert H. Cunliffe Collection of Spectacular Inverted Stamps of the United States and the World - June, 2009 16 #63e, 1c Blue, printed on both sides, Inverted Impression on back, a stunning used example of this immensely rare variety which, according to Don L. Evans in his masterwork The United States 1c Franklin 1861-1867, is one of only two recorded examples, this one not having been on the auction market in over a decade, and the other has not been seen for an even greater length of time, the Cunliffe example displaying a strong second impression on reverse (inverted to the front) of parts of two stamps, circular cork cancel on front, some irregular perforations and several tiny pinholes which do not detract from its extraordinary appearance; woefully undercataloged when one considers both this stamp's enormous rarity, as well as the recent popularity of printed on both sides varieties, which have had stunning realizations of late, by comparison, the 1860 5c Brown, Ty. II, printed on both sides, of which two are recorded (just like the stamp offered here) catalogs currently in Scott at $40,000.00, why this 1c Blue stamp with the same variety only catalogs one tenth that amount can only be attributed to its lack of appearance on the auction market; a 1966 PF certificate was issued but no longer accompanies the item; ex-Isleham, Donaldson. (imagea) $57,500
Spink Shreves Galleries US The Robert H. Cunliffe Collection of Spectacular Inverted Stamps of the United States and the World - June, 2009 35 #296a, 4c Pan-American, Center Inverted, incredibly bright and fresh, sumptuously rich colors and deeply etched impressions, while centered just slightly to the bottom, this stamp possesses far superior centering to most existing examples, full o.g. which is in a much fresher state of preservation than typically found and with only the slightest trace of disturbance endemic to virtually all known copies, very fine and exceedingly choice.An exceptional and highly desirable example of this important 20th century rarity. In a quality which ranks it among the finest available, as it is one of a scant few that are not only attractively centered and sound, but it is also virtually without the heavily disturbed gum which is present on the vast majority of known copies. There were two sheets of 100 each of the Four Cent Pan-American with centers inverted intentionally made for Post Office records. An unknown number of these were overprinted "Specimen" and still others were destroyed. The non-"Specimen" examples were mounted in a Post Office Department book resulting in the vast majority of them having disturbed gum, and a number were also thinned in an effort to remove them from mounting paper. Very few exist today with completely undisturbed original gum and/or free of faults.This wonderful stamp is accompanied by a 1960 PF certificate which states the stamp has "disturbed gum". We happen to fully agree with the written notations on the certificate by the legendary dealer Jack Molesworth who states "Ridiculous comment, probably the most undisturbed gum of any copy known - most of which have gum missing, thinned, etc. from being stuck down." We are confident once this stamp is resubmitted to the Philatelic Foundation, they will state, at worst, the stamp has slightly disturbed gum as usually found. In fact, the value quoted in the Scott catalog is for examples that have "full original gum that is slightly disturbed." $55,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. United States Stamps - March 26-28, 2013 1502 $3.00 Columbian (243). Mint N.H., brilliant color on post-office fresh paper, gorgeous centering with wide and balanced margins, long and full perforations all around

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. AN ABSOLUTELY STUNNING MINT NEVER-HINGED EXAMPLE OF THE $3.00 COLUMBIAN ISSUE IN THE FINEST CONDITION ATTAINABLE. THIS FANTASTIC STAMP HAS BEEN GRADED XF-SUPERB 95 BY P.S.E. -- THIS IS THE HIGHEST GRADE AWARDED TO DATE AND ONE OF ONLY FOUR AMONG BOTH SHADES TO ACHIEVE THIS LOFTY GRADE.

The design for the $3.00 Columbian was taken from a painting by Spanish artist Francisco Jover Casanova (1836-1890) and depicts Columbus describing his third voyage. Another of his paintings was used as the theme for the 8c Columbian.

The $3.00 Columbian is one of the most difficult of the dollar values to obtain in such choice condition. Only 24,713 were issued, which is approximately half the number of the $1.00 and $2.00. The margins are generally narrow on this denomination. The stamp offered here is the exception to the rule. It is beautifully centered, the color and paper are bright and fresh, and the gum is pristine. It is truly one of the finest in existence.

With 2010 P.S.E. certificate (XF-Superb 95, SMQ $77,500.00). This is the highest grade awarded by P.S.E. Only one other Scott 243 and two Scott 243a (Olive Green) have equaled this grade.

$55,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Tahoe Collection of Superb Used U.S. Stamps - February 27, 2008 112 4c Yellow Brown, Perf 10 at Bottom (556b). "Johnstown Pa." two-line precancel applied inverted, rich color, wide margins

EXTREMELY FINE. THE 4-CENT MARTHA WASHINGTON IS ONE OF THE RAREST OF ALL PERF 10 AT ONE SIDE STAMPS. THE EXAMPLE OFFERED HERE IS PROBABLY THE BEST-CENTERED EXAMPLE IN EXISTENCE.

Our records of Scott 556b contain only four used examples. Of these, three have precancels, and one shows transitional perfs at top.

With 1993 P.S.E. and 2004 P.F. certificates

$52,500
Spink Shreves Galleries US Floyd E. Risvold Collection - American Expansion & Journey West - January 27-29, 2010 402 Oregon Missionary Mail via Hawaii folded letter from Sarah Smith datelined "Clear Water Nez Perces Mission Oregon Ter Sept 6 1839" to West Brookfield, Mass., carried via the Sandwich Islands and endorsed "Rec'd Honolulu, Sand. Islds. Decr 16 $52,500
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. 2012 Rarities of the World - June 26, 2012 216 8c Olive Green, Bluish (363). Block of four with wide top selvage, pretty shade on nicely blued paper, top stamps barest trace of hinging (if at all), centered to bottom as are almost all known blocks, perf separations between selvage and block, but the block is completely intact

FINE. AN EXTRAORDINARILY RARE BLOCK OF FOUR -- THE LARGEST RECORDED MULTIPLE OF THE 8-CENT ON BLUISH PAPER. ONE OF THE GREAT RARITIES OF 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES PHILATELY.

During the early stages of production of the 1908-09 Washington-Franklin stamps, the Bureau tried to solve the problem of paper shrinkage that caused off-center perforations and resulted in a large number of unusable sheets. Armstrong notes that up to twenty percent of sheets had to be discarded. The first such experiments resulted in the Bluish Paper stamps (Scott 357-366). Rag cloth was added to the wood pulp mixture, but this did not have the desired effect and the experiment was discontinued.

According to Johl (Vol. 1, page 175), the only source of the 4c and 8c Bluish stamps was the archives of the Post Office Department. Approximately 80 of each were traded for rare stamps missing from the archives. Given the failed experimental nature of the paper mixture, it is no surprise that virtually all copies are off-center to some extent.

Our Levi records contain five blocks of four, of which three have centering similar to the one offered here. We have no record of one after 1956 so we cannot confirm whether it is intact.

Ex "Country Gentleman" (Siegel Sale 422, November 29, 1972) and offered to the market for the first time since that sale. With unfolded 1973 P.F. certificate.

$52,500
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The World's Fair Collection - 1898 Trans-Mississippi Issue - November 6, 2013 363 1c-10c Trans-Mississippi (285-290). Bright colors, tied by "Washington D.C." registry ovals, purple "Registered, Jun. 17, 1898, Washington D.C. Sub-Station No. 29, No. 766" five-line datestamp (with registry number in manuscript) on First Day of Issue cover to Metz, Germany, typewriter address to Hermann Appel, New York registry label, New York (June 18) and Metz (June 26) backstamps, barely reduced at left

VERY FINE. A COLORFUL FIRST DAY COVER BEARING ALL SIX VALUES OF TRANS-MISSISSIPPI ISSUE THROUGH THE 10-CENT. THIS IS THE ONLY RECORDED FIRST DAY COVER WITH ALL OF THESE DENOMINATIONS. A PHENOMENAL RARITY AND ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT CLASSIC COMMEMORATIVE FIRST DAY COVERS EXTANT.

The Trans-Mississippi Exposition was open to the public from June 1 to November 1, 1898. The stamps were not ready in time for the opening, and the official First Day of Issue was June 17. The cover offered here was prepared by J. Murray Bartels.

First Day covers with the Trans-Mississippi Issue are rare. The following quantities are recorded or estimated by Henry Scheuer: 1c: 4-5 used alone (plus 4 in combination); 2c: 12+ used alone (plus 3 in combination); 4c: One used alone (plus 3 in combination); 5c: One used alone (plus 3 in combination); 8c: Two used alone (plus one in combination); 10c: One used alone (plus one in combination); 50c: One (used alone); $1.00: One (used alone); $2.00: None known; Combinations on First Day Covers (one known of each): a) 1c and 2c; b) 1c, 2c, 4c, 5c; c) 1c, 4c, 5c; and d) 1c, 2c, 4c, 5c, 8c, 10c.

Ex McCoy. With 1987 P.F. certificate. Scott Retail $100,000.00

$52,500
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Alan B. Whitman Collection of Outstanding U.S. Stamps - January 27-28, 2009 35 5c Red Brown (28). Original gum, intense reddish shade and remarkably detailed impression on crisp paper.

FINE. THE 1857 5-CENT RED BROWN IS AN EXTREMELY RARE STAMP WITH ORIGINAL GUM. THIS IS ONLY THE SECOND SINGLE WITH ORIGINAL GUM WE HAVE OFFERED IN OVER TEN YEARS OF AUCTIONS. ONE OF THE GREATEST UNHERALDED ORIGINAL-GUM RARITIES OF CLASSIC UNITED STATES PHILATELY. The perforated 5c 1856” Red Brown (Scott 28) stamps were made from the stock of imperforate stamps on hand in 1857 when perforations were introduced. Since these were the first 5c stamps to be put through the perforating machine, they were the first to be used, and very few unused examples survive, especially with original gum.

In the past ten years we have offered over 120,000 auction lots of primarily U.S. stamps. During that time, we have offered only one other single with original gum and the block in the following lot. In our opinion, the Scott Catalogue value for Scott 28 with original gum is far too low. The number of original-gum Scott 28 singles falls somewhere between the numbers for the Brick Red (Scott 27) and the Indian Red (Scott 28A), which catalogue $80,000.00 and $175,000.00, respectively. However, since so few have traded hands in the past ten years and since collectors are generally unaware of how rare this issue is with original gum, the catalogue value has remained largely unchanged. Ex Golin. With 1999 and 2008 P.F. certificate.

$50,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Alan B. Whitman Collection of Outstanding U.S. Stamps - January 27-28, 2009 152 1c Buff, Without Grill (112b). Large part original gum, deep rich color

VERY FINE AND EXTREMELY RARE. NO MORE THAN THREE EXAMPLES OF THE ONE-CENT 1869 PICTORIAL WITHOUT GRILL ARE KNOWN, ACCORDING TO THE ROSE BOOK. We have offered only two since our 1997 Rose sale -- one other and this copy, which appeared in our sale of the Coulter collection in 2006. Ex Coulter. With 2006 P.F. certificate

$50,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Frelinghuysen Collection, Part Two - March 29, 2012 164 5c Brick Red (27). Original gum, small h.r., brilliant color in the true Brick Red shade, choice centering for this difficult issue

VERY FINE AND CHOICE. AN EXTREMELY RARE SOUND ORIGINAL-GUM EXAMPLE OF THE 1857 5-CENT BRICK RED SHADE -- IN OUR OPINION, THE BRICK RED IS ONE OF THE RAREST STAMPS OF THE CLASSIC PERIOD IN SOUND CONDITION WITH ORIGINAL GUM.

Many collectors know this issue by type and shade, but fewer are aware of the order of production (or release). This state of confusion is partly due to the Scott Catalogue. The distinctive Brick Red shade of the 5c 1857 Issue comes first in the series of Scott-listed perforated 5c issues, but its true release date comes later in the sequence.

Based on dated covers, the 5c Type I shades were released in the following order: 1) Red Brown, Scott 28, EDU 8/23/1857, 2) Indian Red, Scott 28A, EDU 3/31/1858, 3) Brick Red, Scott 27, EDU 10/6/1858, 4) Brown, Scott 29, EDU 3/21/1859, almost certainly the last printing from the first 5c plate. The second 5c plate was made from a new six-relief transfer roll with the design projections cut away at top and bottom, to varying degrees. The Type II Brown was issued first (Scott 30A, EDU 5/4/1860), and the Orange Brown printing from the same plate followed about one year later (Scott 30, EDU 5/8/1861).

After surveying dozens of classic United States sale catalogues, we found approximately twenty stamps with original gum, allowing for duplicate offerings and excluding the one known original-gum block. Of the stamps we counted, about half had perfs touching two sides or were deeply cut into on one side. Almost two-thirds had stains or small faults.

With 2011 P.F. certificate.

$50,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. The Natalee Grace Collection of Used U.S. Stamps, Part One - June 7, 2012 36 3c Orange Brown, Printed on Both Sides (10Ab, formerly 10a). Printing on back with same orientation as the front, rich color, large margins to just in, bold small Boston "Paid" grid cancel, back of stamp with clear impression of Washington's head facing left as in printed stamp and also offset of lettering at bottom, tiny thin spot at top

VERY FINE APPEARANCE. THE ONLY RECORDED EXAMPLE OF THE 3-CENT 1851 ISSUE PRINTED ON BOTH SIDES. ONE OF THE RAREST OF ALL IMPERFORATE UNITED STATES STAMPS.

Engraved stamps printed on both sides usually have a poor impression on one side and a second, complete impression on the other. They probably occurred when a sheet was printed without proper moistening, which prevented the paper from picking up the ink in the recessed lines of the engraved plate.

Our list of printed-on-both-sides stamps is included as an appendix to this catalogue. The variety is known on the three denominations issued in 1851 -- 1c, 3c and 12c -- but not on the imperforate stamps issued in 1855 (10c) and 1856 (5c). This is the only recorded example of the 3c 1851 design printed on both sides.

Ex Alexander. Illustrated in Chronicle Vol. 123, p. 164. With 1975 and 2001 P.F. certificates

$50,000
Robert A. Siegel Auction Galleries, Inc. Siegel Sale 1000 - December 8, 2010 1142 $4.00 Rose Carmine, Columbian (244a). Mint N.H., absolutely gorgeous color which is unmistakably in the aniline-ink Rose Carmine shade, magnificent centering with wide and balanced margins, long and full perforations all around

EXTREMELY FINE GEM. THIS MINT NEVER-HINGED $4.00 COLUMBIAN IS WITHOUT QUESTION ONE OF THE FINEST IN EXISTENCE. A TRULY REMARKABLE STAMP IN EVERY RESPECT, THIS HAS BEEN AWARDED THE GRADE OF XF-SUPERB 95 BY P.S.E. -- THIS IS THE HIGHEST GRADE AWARDED TO DATE AND ONLY ONE OTHER SHARES THIS GRADE.

The $4.00 Columbian depicts the two central figures in the story of Columbus -- Queen Isabella and Columbus himself. The portrait of Isabella is said to be based on a painting in Madrid, but its origins have been lost to history. The portrait of Columbus is based on a painting by the artist Lorenzo Lotto (c. 1480-1556). A student of the great painter Raphael, his realistic and empathetic works, filled with distinctive sharp lines and vivid colors, were in sharp contrast to his contemporaries in Venice such as Titian and Tintoretto. He died penniless after joining a religious order. His works were unappreciated until the late 19th and early 20th Century, when he was identified as a forerunner of the Surrealists due to his inclusion of unusual symbolic references in his works. This portrait of Columbus was painted in 1512 as a commission from Domenico Malpiero, a Venetian senator and historian, and was executed shortly after the death of Columbus in 1504. It is one of the earliest portraits of Columbus (none is known to have been painted in his lifetime). This image was also used for several stamps of Chile.

With 2010 P.S.E. certificate (XF-Superb 95, SMQ $65,000.00). This is the highest grade awarded to date and only one other shares this grade. The next-highest grade for this shade in Mint N.H. condition is an 80. For the normal shade, 95 is also the highest grade awarded to date (three in P.S.E. Population Report), followed by 90 (five in P.S.E. Population Report)

$47,500


StampAuctionCentral and StampAuctionNetwork are
Copyright © 1994-2016 Droege Computing Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Back to Top of Page