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SPECIAL COLLECTIONS continued...

AFRICA AND SLAVERY continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
901   [Slavery, New York, 1775] Two early slave documents from New York, the first an August 1775 sale by Henry Williams Esqr. of Brookland in the Province of New York For and in
Consideration of the Sum of Fifty Six pounds twelve shills. Current Mo[Slavery, New York, 1775] Two early slave documents from New York, the first an August 1775 sale by "Henry Williams Esqr. of Brookland in the Province of New York For and in Consideration of the Sum of Fifty Six pounds twelve shills. Current Money...by Thomas Wm. Moore...do fully, clearly...sell and release...a mulatto wench named Dinah aged about eighteen years - a Slave." The second, April 27, 1803, sees "John Youle, of the City of New York Iron Founder...in Consideration of the Sum of two hundred Dollars...sell and release unto Dan Tooker a Nrgro Wench Named Thankfull aget about twenty three Years." Second document with some paste stains at top and a nearly detached fold near the bottom. New York banned slavery in 1799, but all persons who were then slaves would remain so. Any children born after that date would be freed - but not until well into adulthood. If poor Thankfull lived to age 44, she would have been freed by a law passed in 1817 emancipating all slaves by 1827. That, however, was very unlikely, for New York slaveholders realized they would not long have their human property, and most slaves, instead of being freed, were sold South before the laws would affect them. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $625.00
Will close during Public Auction
902   [Slavery, 1777] Early manuscript document signed by executors of the Dreadzil Pace Estate, Late of this Province Deceasd, Taken this 29th day of Sept 1777....One ould Saddle
... (etc.) ...Rose a Negro Wench & her Two Children, Ouldest Daughte[Slavery, 1777] Early manuscript document signed by executors of the Dreadzil Pace Estate, "Late of this Province Deceas'd, Taken this 29th day of Sept 1777....One ould Saddle ... (etc.) ...Rose a Negro Wench & her Two Children, Ouldest Daughter Jenny & youngest Named Betty." The women are by far the most value part of Pace's property, amounting to more than twice as much (220 pounds) as the 80 head of cattle mentioned (104 pounds). Tape remnant at center right. The province in question is not identified. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $150.00
Will close during Public Auction
903   [Slave Trade, 1778] Brief but interesting autograph letter by Eyo Nsa, aka Willy Honesty, a native African slave trader, who writes to Capt. Brighouse in 1778 from Old Calabar:
I recd that letter you send. I been send to show King. I will sen[Slave Trade, 1778] Brief but interesting autograph letter by Eyo Nsa, aka Willy Honesty, a native African slave trader, who writes to Capt. Brighouse in 1778 from Old Calabar: "I rec'd that letter you send. I been send to show King. I will send again to show Duk [Ephraim]. What the matter you no send account for every men owe you Copper. What make I no come because no slaves come yet. I send you slaves. If you love for Break, Book Break, and if you love for paid Copper you paid."Willy Honesty was the man who, on the behalf of Duke Ephraim, had beheaded one of the Robin John brothers (see other lots above) who ruled Old Town, hastening the end of that port's importance in the slave trade. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,050.00
Will close during Public Auction
904   [Slave Trade, 1792] Autograph letter signed by W. Roscoe to Capt. William Lace of the ship Angola, Liverpool, July 12, 1792. He asks the slave trader to bring him plants and
seeds and continues: The Employment you are now interested with i[Slave Trade, 1792] Autograph letter signed by W. Roscoe to Capt. William Lace of the ship Angola, Liverpool, July 12, 1792. He asks the slave trader to bring him plants and seeds and continues: "The Employment you are now interested with is very weighty & important - To have the unlimited direction & controul of several hundreds of people...places you in a situation of great responsibility...to the poor creatures committed to your charge & to your own conscience. That you will discharge this serious duty with fidelity & with as much humanity as is with consistent with the nature of the business I make no doubt...Let the poor imprisoned African fnd that in all his distresses he is not without a friend. May god bless you & all under your care whatever may be their complexion." some splitting at folds. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $4,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
905   [Slave Trade Agreement, 1806] Choice manuscript agreement between merchant Christopher Dey, owners John Spooner and Benning Pickering, and master Joseph Stevens of the schooner
Commerce of Newport, February 20, 1806, in which the ship is to t[Slave Trade Agreement, 1806] Choice manuscript agreement between merchant Christopher Dey, owners John Spooner and Benning Pickering, and master Joseph Stevens of the schooner Commerce of Newport, February 20, 1806, in which the ship is to travel from Newport, RI, "to the Coast of Africa and will probably in the course of said voiyage touch at Cape Coast Castle...She shall there receive on board twenty one prime slaves and carry the same to the Havanna...If the vessel shall not be permitted by the Spanish Government to enter the Havanna then the said slaves shall be carried to Charleston, South Carolina." In exceptional condition. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $3,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
906   [Slavery] Group of four interesting items: An autograph letter signed by James Morrison in Lexington, Ky, to Col. John C. Sullivan in St. Louis, about collecting a debt and
managing Morrisons property. He admonishes, I pray you to be careful[Slavery] Group of four interesting items: An autograph letter signed by James Morrison in Lexington, Ky, to Col. John C. Sullivan in St. Louis, about collecting a debt and managing Morrison's property. He admonishes, "I pray you to be careful in hiring the negroes to those only who will be attentive to their wants, should the hire be even less than if hired to those who would be cruel and treat them as some do, worse than beasts." But Morrison is also practical: "If you can sell the negroes at the prices named by Mr. Scott, or for more, do so, viz. for Polly & her son...1100$ but let it be in specie and US Notes...Ralph is said to be young and likely, and the Girl at Hempsteads retain, as he expresses a wish that she should be suffered to remain."With a manuscript document, December 10, 1822, by which John L. Sutton of St. Louis sells "a certain mulatto girl called Julia, aged about one year, the daughter of Susan slave of said Sutton" to Robert Duncan. Also with a partly printed document, in French in which the treasurer of New Orleans pays Mr. J. Longue $6.75 for 27 days of work by "his negro Malbrough, employed on public works." At left it is explained that the pay is "de Negres a la chaine." Finally, with a manuscript receipt, bearing the seal of the Parish of Terre Bonne, for $450 received from William Woods, March 18, 1829, "for a Negro Girl named Betsy aged about seventeen years." (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
907   [Slave Documents] Twelve documents and one broadside concerning the sale of slaves in the 1830s and 40s, mostly in Louisiana. Great detail on the sale of human beings from age
9 months to age 45. The broadside is for the sale by St. Louis County[Slave Documents] Twelve documents and one broadside concerning the sale of slaves in the 1830s and '40s, mostly in Louisiana. Great detail on the sale of human beings from age 9 months to age 45. The broadside is for the sale by St. Louis County court commissioners Edward Tracy and John O'Fallon for the sale of nine slaves from the estate of James Lakenan on January 9, 1832, to wit: Edie, Melvin, Henry, Mary, Betsey, Jane, Lucy, Silas, and Melvin, a boy." Someone has added their ages in pen at the bottom of the announcement, showing that Silas is but 3 years old and Melvin 9 months. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $3,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
908 c   [The case of the slave Dred Scott], 1839 folded letter with integral address leaf from Joseph Rolette to Major J. F. Smith at St. Louis with manuscript Prairie du Chien W.T.May
25 postmark and matching Paid 25, stain at bottom center, very f[The case of the slave Dred Scott], 1839 folded letter with integral address leaf from Joseph Rolette to Major J. F. Smith at St. Louis with manuscript "Prairie du Chien W.T./May 25" postmark and matching "Paid 25," stain at bottom center, very fine.Joseph Rolette's letter is probably was in response to an inquiry by Major Thomas Floyd Smith, on behalf of Mrs. Emerson and/or Dred Scott, as to the possibility of Dred being hired out or even sold, so that he could come back to a free territory. There can be little doubt that the boy is a slave and wants his freedom. The time frame fits the case of Dred Scott.In the letter Rolette writes: "...The Boy they do not want back - as they have written for another one what Capt. Alex. promised him, they are ignorant, but as to his claiming his freedom from having lived in a free country would not be sustained, it has been decided in Philadelphia and in this Territory, that an officer was ordered to such as post, and that he has a right to take his Servants with him as well as his Baggage - that he has no right and this not acquire by his staying the right of a Citizen of the State or Territory where he was stationed."Dred Scott was an American negro born into slavery about 1800. He was owned by Dr. John Emerson, a U.S. Army surgeon and traveled with Emerson to various army posts, on the Mississippi River, between 1833 and 1838. In 1838, or before, he sued for his freedom, on the contention, that a slave living at Fort Snelling, in a free territory, was free on his return to Missouri, a slave state. The Missouri courts decided that Scott was "not free", that he was still a slave and Emerson had as much right to take him as well as he did to take along his baggage to a free territory. Finally, in 1857, in one of the most far-reaching slave cases to reach the Supreme Court, he was again denied his freedom. Dred Scott died September 17,1858.In 1836-37-38 Dr. Emerson took Dred Scott with him to Forts Armstrong and Snelling and on his return to St. Louis, in 1838, he left Dred with Mrs. Emerson. Emerson was given an honorable discharge from the army in 1842 and died in 1843. The ownership of Dred Scott then passed to his widow who had been hiring him out to various persons, including army officers. Dr. Emerson had been at Fort Snelling in 1839 and the fore part of 1840, but it is highly unlikely that he would have taken Dred with him after being sued by Dred. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $7,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
909   [Anti-Slavery Society] Printed circular letter for the American Anti-Slavery Society, soliciting for the Societys Almanac for 1840. Signed by the Societys book agent, R.G.
Williams. Cover of letter features seven woodcuts to appear in the book.[Anti-Slavery Society] Printed circular letter for the American Anti-Slavery Society, soliciting for the Society's Almanac for 1840. Signed by the Society's book agent, R.G. Williams. Cover of letter features seven woodcuts to appear in the book. Some partial fold splits, but otherwise excellent. Also with the Book: The African Captives: Trial of the Prisoners of the Amistad on the Writ of Habeas Corpus, Before the Circuit Court of the United States, for the District of Connecticut, at Hartford; Judges Thompson and Judson, September Term, 1839. New York, 1839. 8vo, no wraps, sewn. Some foxing. With an ALS by James G. Birney on an anti-slavery letter sheet, Cincinnati, October 9, 1839, to Joseph Sullivant of Columbus, on attending an Anti-Slavery Society meeting. The sheet depicts a slave in chains, on one knee, praying. With a printed membership certificate for George Bruce in the Colonization Society of the State of New York. With the Pamphlet: Great Auction Sale of Slaves at Savannah. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
910   [Fur Trader McKenzie Buys Slaves] Choice manuscript document signed by Samuel Russell and Thomas Russell, St. Louis, September 5, 1843. For...the sum of Three Hundred & fifty
dollars to me in hand paid...have granted bargained sold & transferr[Fur Trader McKenzie Buys Slaves] Choice manuscript document signed by Samuel Russell and Thomas Russell, St. Louis, September 5, 1843. "For...the sum of Three Hundred & fifty dollars to me in hand paid...have granted bargained sold & transferred...unto Kenneth Mackenzie...a certain negro Girl named Louisa a slave for life of yellow complection about seventeen years of age, and her child a Boy about four months old, to have and to hold...forever." In exceptionally good condition. McKenzie had lost his position as a fur trader in 1834 when Nathaniel Wyeth and M.S. Cerre, angry with his trading practices, turned him in for operating a still with which he distilled liquor that he sold to Native Americans. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $1,050.00
Will close during Public Auction
911 c   [Livingston describes his discovery of the Great Cataract of the Zambezi River known as Victoria Falls in November of 1855], four page folded letter with integral address leaf
signed David Livingston and datelined Tete or Nyungue, March 15, 18[Livingston describes his discovery of the Great Cataract of the Zambezi River known as Victoria Falls in November of 1855], four page folded letter with integral address leaf signed "David Livingston" and datelined "Tete or Nyungue, March 15, 1856", carried privately to Mission House, London, England, where it was forwarded to Northwich, Cheshire with 1d Red (damaged), London and blue "Northwich/Ja 25, 1857" backstamp, arriving over ten months after the letter was written, fine.Livingston writes to his classmate and fellow missionary, Reverend David C. Watt: " … I shall only say that to write while in Angola half dead with dysentery was an impossibility ….Then at Sekeletu's I could not for want of time ere my postman of Arabian extraction started …But more personico, let us proceed as follows.This is the farthest inland station now in possession of the Portuguese in Eastern Africa and I reached by God's mercy on the 2nd current pretty well knocked up I can assure you and as thin as a lath …The river thus far down is healthy and I am resting a short time here in order that I may have no delay in Senna and Quilimane which are both deadly enough.You will be pleased to hear of the success which it has pleased our Heavenly guide to award me. ….The middle of the continent is a hollow in reference to two ridges on its Eastern and Western sides. All the feeders of the great drams (?) of the country flow towards the middle and the North or South according as they belong to the Western or Eastern outlets viz. the Zaire and Zambesi. Indeed one river actually flows both ways, dividing its waters between the Atlantic and Indian oceans….. In going up towards Angola in this basin, I had fever in pretty severe forms no fewer than twenty seven times … Well the Zambesi once formed an immense lake in exactly the same way and the shallow Ngami is only the residuum left because a like fissure does not extend far enough to drain its bottom-The fissure is Monoatunya (Mosioatunya - or "The smoke that thunders" - one of the natural wonders of the world now known forever as Victoria Falls) - A rent made in the hard basalitic bed from bank to bank and in tumbles the river of a thousand yards and is compressed at the bottom into 15 or 20. The rent is prolonged through the hills for 30 miles and the river emerges broad and placid again to flow away through fertile vales to the N. E. It reaches 15 37' south lat. though the rent is in 17 57' S. … we were a company of sturdy beggars 113 in number fed us kindly till we came near to this. I intend coming to England to bring my wife - May God grant you his blessing - Ever affectionately & Truly your friend David LivingstonI have not forgot my debt but will pay as soon as I am within the sphere of the money order department, Please don't arrest me as soon as I land."With the Book: Narrative of an Expedition to the Zambesi and Its Tributaries.... D Livingstone. NY, Harper & Bros., 1866 8vo, original cloth with gilt spine. With frontis, 12 plates & folding map with hand-colored route. Library label on spine. Light foxing, Livingston left Cape Town, South Africa, on June 8, 1852, beginning a four-year, coast-to-coast exploration of Africa. Sekeletu, the new chief of the Makololo and son of his friend Sebitoane, accompanied him. Livingston traveled through present-day Angola, Rhodesia, and Zambia, arriving at Quilimane in Mozambique in May, 1856, a journey of almost six thousand miles. The expedition was sponsored by the London Missionary Society to search for a malaria free mission and trading center on the upper Zambia, and to this end he explored the Barotse valley 300 miles northwest up the Zambezi. He then attempted to find a viable path for traders from the interior to the West African coast, traveling to the Atlantic port of Loanda in Portuguese Angola. He left Loanda in September 1854, heading downstream on, the Zambezi for the east African coast and Quilimane. In November of 1855, sailing down stream on the Zambesi, Livingston discovered the Victoria Falls, where a mile-wide water channel suddenly contracts to 30 yards, with a drop of 320 feet, and which continues as a roaring torrent for 30 miles. Livingston left the region of the Victoria Falls and crossed the Batoka Plateau, still searching for a healthy, well-irrigated and temperate location for a European settlement. Although the Batoka Plateau had all these qualities, it was 800 miles from the mouth of the Zambezi and thus the river would have to be navigable for almost a thousand miles. Livingston turned his attention once again to the Zambezi. Livingston reached Tete, a Portuguese settlement in Mozambique on March 3, 1856, 12 days before this letter was written. (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $32,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
912 c   [Slave Auction Illustrated Cover] Dealer in Negroes, Will L. Boyd, Jr., General Agent, Nashville, Tenn., striking illustrated advertising cover with Cash Advances Made on
Negroes Consigned, addressed to Athens, Tennessee with 3c Dull red (26)[Slave Auction Illustrated Cover] Dealer in Negroes, Will L. Boyd, Jr., General Agent, Nashville, Tenn., striking illustrated advertising cover with "Cash Advances Made on Negroes Consigned," addressed to Athens, Tennessee with 3c Dull red (#26) tied by blue "Nashville, Ten./Jun 25, 1858" datestamp, cover with small repair at top just affecting the design with a tiny portion of design drawn in, otherwise extremely fine; the only known illustrated slave auction advertising cover; illustrated in Alexander; ex-Antrim, Hart. (Image) Est. $7,500-10,000

SOLD for $28,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
913   [Slavery, 18501860s] Choice group of five items: three are Louisiana bills of sale for slaves, two of them on partly printed forms, with a Civil War-date manuscript
announcement by George Smith, reading: Negroes fo [sic] Sale  I will sel[Slavery, 1850/1860s] Choice group of five items: three are Louisiana bills of sale for slaves, two of them on partly printed forms, with a Civil War-date manuscript announcement by George Smith, reading: "Negroes fo [sic] Sale / I will sell two likely negroes girls age 12 & 14 years old belonging to the estate of Wm. W. Smith dec'd privately for cash in hand and if not sold...by the first Monday in February 1864 i will sell them publickly to the hiest bidder at the court house door in liberty. Jan. 4th 1864." With a partly printed estimate for "Slaves, furnished to the Confederate States for service on the Coast," four men whose combined value is $14,700. (imagea) (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
914 c   Dealer in Slaves, J.W. Boazman, New Orleans oval printed corner card on cover to Mobile, Alabama with 3c Dull red (26, corner crease) tied by New Orleans datestamp, very fine a
rare slave dealer advertising cover.Dealer in Slaves, J.W. Boazman, New Orleans oval printed corner card on cover to Mobile, Alabama with 3c Dull red (#26, corner crease) tied by New Orleans datestamp, very fine; a rare slave dealer advertising cover. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $2,900.00
Will close during Public Auction
915   [Slavery, Emancipation] Three unusual items concerning the end of slavery and its aftermath. Includes a moving content autograph letter signed by Maria Banks, Norfolk, VA,
September 6, 1875. She writes dry goods merchant AJ Stewart, a New York ma[Slavery, Emancipation] Three unusual items concerning the end of slavery and its aftermath. Includes a moving content autograph letter signed by Maria Banks, Norfolk, VA, September 6, 1875. She writes dry goods merchant AJ Stewart, a New York man of wealth, looking for money or employment: "I am a colored girl was formerly a slave. My master was my father and is yet living in North Carrolina, he is a rich man but refuse to help me because I am an illigitimate child that is my misfortune not my fault for that is the curse of American Slavery and the everlasting stigma is on me. Though my complexion is fair and my hair just as strate as any white person yet I feel the curse of my caste... What little leraning I have, I picked it up since the close of the war. For the last five years I taught a school of contraband children...Recently the times got so hard and the chidrens parents began to pay so slow, that I had to give the school up, and the children now attend the Public Free school...I am 36 years old a single woman with an old mother to support...Her late Master (my father) has worked the very life out of her...Ten years ago I commenc'd to save a little money put it in the Freedmens Bank and lost every cent."With a tinted carte-de-visite photograph by JP Soule of GG fish's work, "Emancipation," published by Soule in Boston, 1863, showing Columbia with a scroll, standing upon broken chains, with a black man at her left holding the US flag and a light-skinned black woman clothed by its stripes at right. Some foxing. Also with a modern cover of the Emancipation. (imagea) (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $4,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
916   [Henry M. Stanley - Slavery and cannablism on expedition] The Jameson Affair, incredible, and important, content Manuscript Signed by Assad E. Farran, 3 pages, legal folio,
July 14, 1888, an interpreter in the 1886 expedition led by Henry M. Stan[Henry M. Stanley - Slavery and cannablism on expedition] The Jameson Affair, incredible, and important, content Manuscript Signed by Assad E. Farran, 3 pages, legal folio, July 14, 1888, an interpreter in the 1886 expedition led by Henry M. Stanley to "rescue" Emin Pasha, a German-born official on the Upper Nile. He gives his testimony in the horrifying incident involving James Jameson, scion of the Irish whiskey distiller. Before leaving the port of Zanzibar, Stanley agreed with "Tipoo Tip that Tipoo Tip should give him 600 men when they arrive at Stanley falls. This Expedition went as far as the Yarowimi river, there they made a strong camp and Mr. Stanley...took 400 of the men...and left the rest in that camp...Mr. Stanley left...on the 27th of June 1887 promising to be back about the beginning of Novembe … The major who was in command had many means of preserving the men … but he was cruely treating the men .. and shooting them even. Tippoo Tip's men has heard about all this & therefore would not engage this expedition. (plus a substantial portion not quoted here)"Mr. Jameson being anxious to see how the natives eat each other, bought a girl at a village called riba riba about 10 years old & gave her to the natives to eat her that he might see the act. The natives were very glad & having tied her hand to a tree, steeped her twice with a knife in the belly. She at once fell doen dead & the blood gushed out, about 8 men of the natives ran with their knives & began cuting their victim which they took to their huts & put the meat in the cooking pots. Mr. Jameson being very much pleased with this sight was making pictures of every act they were doing. As soon as Tippoo-Tip's men arrived at Yambouya camp with Mr. J.S. Jameson the major intended to leave the camp...to look for Mr. Stanley."In fuller accounts of the incident, it is told that Jameson purchased the girl for the steep price of 6 white handkerchiefs. With bound commemorative Menu for an 1890 dinner given for Stanley in London. Affidavit with uneven top edge.The present statement is surely the one given to Belgian officials in Africa. Jameson was already ill with a jungle disease and would soon die in the depths of the Congo. Two years later, a version agreeing in all particulars was published by the New York Times (after the London papers). Jameson's wife released a letter about it from her husband that essentially agreed with Farran's version, but made someone else the impetus of the sale and killing, with Jameson as a kind of dupe who provided the handkerchiefs after expressing skepticism about Tipu Tip's men being cannibals. The Jameson incident, and the general disaster that the expedition had become, ensured that it would be Stanley's last. (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $10,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
917 c   [Ku Klux Klan], cover with allover back illustration of Stone Mountain and two robed Clansmen with flaming tourches on horseback, front with Imperial Office, Invisible Empire,
Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, Atlanta, Ga imprint and 3c Violet (50[Ku Klux Klan], cover with allover back illustration of Stone Mountain and two robed Clansmen with flaming tourches on horseback, front with "Imperial Office, Invisible Empire, Knight's of the Ku Klux Klan, Atlanta, Ga" imprint and 3c Violet (#501) tied by "Columbia, S.C./June 20, 1918" machine postmark to Richwood, West Virginia, very fine. (Image) Est. $200-300

SOLD for $400.00
Will close during Public Auction
CIRCUS
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
918   P. T. Barnum Book: Struggles and Triumphs, or Sixty Years of Recollections... P.T. Barnum. Buffalo, Courier Co., 1889. 8vo, in his gift binding (black morocco with marbled
boards). Signed and inscribed To my dear Friend, Alex R. Thompson,P. T. Barnum Book: Struggles and Triumphs, or Sixty Years of Recollections... P.T. Barnum. Buffalo, Courier Co., 1889. 8vo, in his gift binding (black morocco with marbled boards). Signed and inscribed "To my dear Friend, Alex R. Thompson, DD, with kind regards, PT Barnum...May 30 1890." on free front endpaper. With Risvold label and old cataloguing on facing page. Some cracking at hinges, exterior wear. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $700.00
Will close during Public Auction
919   [Barnums Museum] Delightful broadside Barnums Museum  1776 - 1861...Second Week of that Wonderful Living HIPPOPOTAMUS With Barnums bill on the opposite side for MIBEAR SAMSON,
The largest BEAR ever captured alive...THE GREAT SEA LION..[Barnum's Museum] Delightful broadside "Barnum's Museum / 1776 - 1861...Second Week of that Wonderful Living HIPPOPOTAMUS" With Barnum's bill on the opposite side for MI"BEAR SAMSON, The largest BEAR ever captured alive...THE GREAT SEA LION...What is it? or Man Monkey." (Image) Est. $200-300

SOLD for $800.00
Will close during Public Auction
920   Circus Illustrated Broadside 15.5 x 21.25 printed by Day & Follett of Buffalo, announcing the appearance of A Lama, From Peru along with entertainment by monkeys and apes, and
boasting of its headliner that This is the most curious andCircus Illustrated Broadside 15.5" x 21.25" printed by Day & Follett of Buffalo, announcing the appearance of "A Lama, From Peru" along with entertainment by monkeys and apes, and boasting of its headliner that "This is the most curious and singular animal ever exhibited in America. ...Also appearing are "The African Ape, The Long Tail'd Marmozete, Brown Sajoe, from Barbary, &c. The collection will appear at E & J Carpenters on Monday, October 2, (which has been added by hand at bottom) for the price of 25 cents." Condition problems but a wonderful and evocative, illustrated item. Probably dates ca. 1850. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction

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