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WESTERN EXPANSION continued...

CONFEDERATE STATES continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
881 c   Confederate Mixed Issue Franking, Marion C.H., S.C.Ap 24 well struck datestamp tying 5c Olive green, Stone A (1c) first color, in combination with 5c Blue, Stone 2 (4), both
with large even margins all around, to brown homemade cover used to GConfederate Mixed Issue Franking, Marion C.H., S.C./Ap 24 well struck datestamp tying 5c Olive green, Stone A (#1c) first color, in combination with 5c Blue, Stone 2 (#4), both with large even margins all around, to brown homemade cover used to Gish's Mill, Va., extremely fine; an especially handsome and choice mixed issue franking. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,450.00
Will close during Public Auction
882 c   Confederate Mixed Issue Franking, Bishopville, S.C.Jul 17 datestamp struck three times tying 5c Green, Stone 1 (1) together with 5c Blue, Stone 2 (4), both stamp with ample
margins to just touching, to buff cover addressed to a doctor of the PConfederate Mixed Issue Franking, Bishopville, S.C./Jul 17 datestamp struck three times tying 5c Green, Stone 1 (#1) together with 5c Blue, Stone 2 (#4), both stamp with ample margins to just touching, to buff cover addressed to a doctor of the Palmetto Battalion Light Artillery at Charleston, S.C., clear strike of postmark repeated at left, very fine; ex-Schenk. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $675.00
Will close during Public Auction
883 c   Confederate States balance, six covers comprised of pair of 5c Blue (7) tied to captured Union patriotic cover, patriotic cover with illustrated song sheet enclosure from New
Orleans with two different strikes of Due 5, 5c Green (1) tiedConfederate States balance, six covers comprised of pair of 5c Blue (#7) tied to captured Union patriotic cover, patriotic cover with illustrated song sheet enclosure from New Orleans with two different strikes of "Due 5", 5c Green (#1) tied to mourning cover and three 10c Blue (#11) covers, with Staunton, Va., blue Courtland, Ala. and red Crawfordville, Miss. datestamps, Confederate patriotic with edge wear and some toning, otherwise very fine. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
884 c   Confederate Wallpaper Cover, green, rose, gray and tan floral design cover used to Peterersburg, Va. with 10c Blue, Die A (11, light stain), large to enormous margins all
around, tied by Hillsboro, N.C.Aug 13 blue double circle datestamp, extreConfederate Wallpaper Cover, green, rose, gray and tan floral design cover used to Peterersburg, Va. with 10c Blue, Die A (#11, light stain), large to enormous margins all around, tied by Hillsboro, N.C./Aug 13 blue double circle datestamp, extremely fine and handsome. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,400.00
Will close during Public Auction
885 c   Confederate Adversity Cover, Richmond, Va.Dec 12 datestamp ties 10c Blue, Die B (12), ample to large margins, to adversity cover made from sailing ship illustrated insurance
company policy addressed to Tolersville, Va., cover with colorlessConfederate Adversity Cover, Richmond, Va./Dec 12 datestamp ties 10c Blue, Die B (#12), ample to large margins, to adversity cover made from sailing ship illustrated insurance company policy addressed to Tolersville, Va., cover with colorless embossed insurance company corner card, extremely fine. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,700.00
Will close during Public Auction
886 c   Confederate Trans-Mississippi, Express Mail-via Shreveport manuscript directive on wallpaper adversity cover franked by two copies of 20c Green (13), one with clear to huge
margins including a sheet margin at base, the other with margins toConfederate Trans-Mississippi, Express Mail-/via Shreveport manuscript directive on wallpaper adversity cover franked by two copies of 20c Green (#13), one with clear to huge margins including a sheet margin at base, the other with margins to cutting, both tied by blue "Sherman, Tex/Jan 18" datestamp which is repeated at lower left, addressed to Demopolis, Alabama and redirected to Jefferson, with manuscript "Ford due 10", left side flap missing, still very fine for this.A rare and stunning Trans-Mississippi usage of two 20c Washington stamps on a wallpaper cover.With the fall of New Orleans and Vicksburg, the control of the Mississippi River passed into the hands of the Union forces and split the Confederacy in two. In order the maintain the mail service between the east and west a special express mail route was established to run the Union blockade of the river. The rate for this special service was 40c per half ounce. Covers can be identified by this rate and the fact that they are either westbound or eastbound across the Mississippi River. Eastbound covers are endorsed "via Shreveport" or "via Alexandria" and the westbound covers "via Brandon" or "via Meridian". Some, such as the example offered here, also include the directive "via Express". (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $13,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
887 c   Adams Private Express Through-The-Lines, *Adams Ex. Co.*Louisville, Ky.Jul 31, 1861 perfectly struck bold handstamp on South to North thru-the-lines cover to Chester,
Connecticut originating in the Confederacy, entered the Union mails withAdams Private Express Through-The-Lines, *Adams Ex. Co.*/Louisville, Ky./Jul 31, 1861 perfectly struck bold handstamp on South to North thru-the-lines cover to Chester, Connecticut originating in the Confederacy, entered the Union mails with vertical pair 3c Dull red (#26, bottom stamp damaged) tied by blue grids and matching double circle "Louisville, Ky./Aug 1, 1861" datestamps, cover with large Adams Express, S.A. Jones, Agent label affixed to reverse giving instructions and rates for mail to the Confederate States, opened out for exhibition and reinforced along the fold, very fine and rare; illustrated in "The 3c Stamp of the United States 1851-1857 Issue" by Carroll Chase on page 323; Four reported examples of this label on cover;ex-Knapp, Emerson and Chase.The Federal government had suspended all mail communication with the south by June 7, 1861. Private express companies provided mail service between the Tennessee and Kentucky until August 26, 1861, when all service was banned. (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $8,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
888 c   Flag of Truce, manuscript directive on small mourning cover to New York City with 3c Rose (65) tied by segmented cork cancel, entered the Union mails with double circle Old
Point Comfort, VaSep 3 datestamp, with original letter with three ConFlag of Truce, manuscript directive on small mourning cover to New York City with 3c Rose (#65) tied by segmented cork cancel, entered the Union mails with double circle "Old Point Comfort, Va/Sep 3" datestamp, with original letter with three Confederate 10c Blue, Die A (#11) stamps lightly affixed at the edge, very fine. Under the dateline "Spotswood Hotel, Richmond, Va. Aug 30, 1864" the writer explains how to send a letter via Flag of Truce and enclosed a newspaper clipping of instructions along with three 10c Confederate stamps. The cover was sent pre-paid with the U.S. 3c stamp and the 10c Confederate postage paid in cash. It made no difference to the U.S. regarding the Confederate share as long and the U.S. postage was paid. The enclosed letter is indicative of the means most Confederate stamps found used on southbound Flag of Truce covers found their way to the senders. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $3,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
889 c   Per Flag of Truce, manuscript directive on two matching green, rose, and white on tan, floral design wallpaper covers from same correspondence used to Jackson, Missouri, the
first franked with 3c Dull red (26, damaged) which was not cancellePer Flag of Truce, manuscript directive on two matching green, rose, and white on tan, floral design wallpaper covers from same correspondence used to Jackson, Missouri, the first franked with 3c Dull red (#26, damaged) which was not cancelled, the 1857 issue stamp having been demonetized, manuscript "Due 6" applied, entered the Union mails with bold double circle "Old Point Comfort, Va/Feb 1" datestamp and light "Due/6" in circle, the second cover, with original letter, is validly franked with 1861 issue 3c Rose (#65) and is tied by waffle grid and with double circle "Old Point Comfort, Va/Feb 8" datestamp, the second cover is accompanied by the original letter datelined "Mobile, Ala. Jan 26, 1864", and exceptional duo.In the letter a Confederate soldier writes home to his sister in Jackson, Missouri in reply to a previous letter: "...I answered it by flag of truce, but am afraid you will not get it, as the stamp I used was worthless one as I have since learned, one of the old issue..." The letter referenced is probably the first of the two covers offered here. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $5,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
890 c   Federal Prison at Fort Delaware, Prisoners LetterExaminedFort Delaware, Del. clear oval censors handstamp on orange cover to Haynesville, Alabama, with 3c Rose (65) cancelled
by grid and matching Delaware CityDelAug 29 postmark, endorsedFederal Prison at Fort Delaware, Prisoner's Letter/Examined/Fort Delaware, Del. clear oval censor's handstamp on orange cover to Haynesville, Alabama, with 3c Rose (#65) cancelled by grid and matching "Delaware City/Del/Aug 29" postmark, endorsed "Per "Flag of truce"/Via Fortress Monroe/Care of Maj Gen Butler" and entered the Confederate mails with 10c Blue, Die A (#11), four large to huge margins but affixed slightly over cover edge, tied by clear "Richmond, Va./Sep 13" datestamp, very fine conjunctive use. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $2,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
891 c   Federal Prison at Point Lookout, ApprovedJ.A. PattersonCapt. & Provost Marshal,Point Lookout, Md. beautifully struck large oval handstamp on cover to Shady Grove, Virginia,
with 3c Rose (65) tied by target cancel, matching Point Look Out, MdFederal Prison at Point Lookout, Approved/J.A. Patterson/Capt. & Provost Marshal,/Point Lookout, Md. beautifully struck large oval handstamp on cover to Shady Grove, Virginia, with 3c Rose (#65) tied by target cancel, matching "Point Look Out, Md/Mar 8" datestamp, endorsed "by flag of truce", additionally franked with Confederate States 10c Blue, Die B (#12) probably applied by the sender and tied by indistinct Confederate datestamp, very fine conjunctive use. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
892 c   Confederate Prison in Madison, Georgia, manuscript Soldiers Letter JA Campbell AAG endorsement and From Capt W W WarnerPrisoner of War Madison, Ga Federal soldiers senders
notation on July 1, 1862 folded letter with integral address leafConfederate Prison in Madison, Georgia, manuscript "Soldier's Letter/ JA Campbell AAG" endorsement and "From Capt W W Warner/Prisoner of War Madison, Ga" Federal soldier's sender's notation on July 1, 1862 folded letter with integral address leaf used to Clermont, Iowa, manuscript "Examined" censor's marking, entered the mails with double circle "Nashville, Ten/Jul 25, 1862" datestamp and matching "Due 3" handstamp, 3c Rose (#65) pen cancelled by pen strokes on reverse, very fine and rare. Two recorded prisoner of war covers from the Madison, Georgia prison.The letter, written by Captain W.W. Warner while a prisoner of war, describes the prison: "I send this by Lieut. McCullock one of our officers parolled to go to our lines...we had been quartered at Atlanta one week & here nearly two weeks - our present prison is the third story of a factory which has been arranged as a military prison - it is surrounded by a close fence some twelve feet high - a very secure place closely guarded. We have the range of the yard but are not permitted to go out..."Captain William W. Warner was interned in "God's Acre" cemetery at Clermont, Iowa. His headstone reads: "Died at Memphis, Tennessee, Dec. 13, 1863." (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $4,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
893 c   Prisoner of War balance, six covers with 3c Rose (#65), three from Federal prisons with censor handstamps including Elmira and Old Capitol Prison, also one from a Morgan Raider at Camp Chase and one from the Confederate prison at Selma, Alabama to the North, finally a cover via "Flag of truce" to a prisoner at Camp Point Lookout, Md., one with stamp damaged from cover reduction, otherwise generally fine-very fine. Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $3,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
894   Prisoners of War balance of letters, a rare gathering of letters from and about prisoners of war on both the Union and Confederate sides. Includes an ALS by General in Chief
Henry W. Halleck, Nov 17, 1862, to Governor Samuel J. Kirkwood of Iowa,Prisoners of War balance of letters, a rare gathering of letters from and about prisoners of war on both the Union and Confederate sides. Includes an ALS by General in Chief Henry W. Halleck, Nov 17, 1862, to Governor Samuel J. Kirkwood of Iowa, in which he writes "Lt. Col Ludlow reports to day that all Iowa troops captured at Shiloh have been exchanged; that Confederate authorities have never reported any prisoners in their hands taken at Belmont. It was supposed that Genl. Grant had effected their exchange many months ago. This matter will be further inquired into." With a letter from Capt. J.G. Fowler to Iowa Adjutant General N.B. Baker, telling him that the 12th Iowa was almost entirely killed, injured, or captured in the Battle of Shiloh, and asking for his help. With a letter by Confederate soldier A.J. Lovett, writing from the military prison at Rock Island, IL, September 1864, to Mrs. Lucy Hughes, who has been sending blankets and clothing to the prison. He asks for "pants...2 pair of drawers, 1 shirt, 2 pair of socks 2 cotton Hankerchiefs, 1 comb...1 pair of pants 32 by 33, also some Tobacco & some writing paper & Envelopes." With two letters from A.W. Tiffany, a Union soldier imprisoned in Charleston, SC, August and September 1864, to his wife in Minnesota: "We expect now very soon to be exchanged, no doubt, I think, Hope keeps the spirits up...When I come to Min...I would like to see on the table at every meal a bountiful pile of Min. potatoes, never in my life did I want them so anxious." September letter with original envelope bearing 3-cent US stamp. With a ribbon from the 15th Annual Reunion Iowa Union Ex-Prisoners of War Association, 1897. Finally, with an amazing typescript of a speech given before the GAR in 1909 about a soldier's experiences at Andersonville Prison; and a typescript of a statement of facts on the surrender of the Third Minnesota Volunteers at Murfreesboro, July 13, 1862. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
895 c   Confederate Trans-Rio Grande Route from Mexico, Eagle Pass, TexOct 28 mostly clear datestamp tying horizontal pair 5c Blue (7), large margins to in at left, to folded cover
that originated in Mexico, and was carried out of the mails acrossConfederate Trans-Rio Grande Route from Mexico, Eagle Pass, Tex/Oct 28 mostly clear datestamp tying horizontal pair 5c Blue (#7), large margins to in at left, to folded cover that originated in Mexico, and was carried out of the mails across the River to Eagle Pass, addressed to San Antonio and docketed on reverse "October 23 - 1862/Don Jesus Silba on/Flour + Wheat", very fine.Eagle Pass, Texas is located on the east bank of the Rio Grande River directly across from Piedras Negras, Mexico. It was adjacent to Fort Duncan which was built in 1849. Texas seceded from the Union 1 February 1861 and joined the Confederacy 6 March, 1861. After that date the fort was garrisoned by Confederate troops until the end of the war. On 23 March, 1868 it was reoccupied by Federal troops. This folded cover originated somewhere in Mexico and was carried privately to Eagle Pass where it was placed in the mails. (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $2,900.00
Will close during Public Auction
896    The Cruise of the Alabama and the Sumter Raphael Semmes. London, Saunders, Otley & Co., 1864 Second edition. 2 vols. 8vo, ½ red leather, marbled boards, gilt spines. Morrell
binding. Well rubbed edges with some board exposure, hinge wear but The Cruise of the Alabama and the Sumter Raphael Semmes. London, Saunders, Otley & Co., 1864 Second edition. 2 vols. 8vo, ½ red leather, marbled boards, gilt spines. Morrell binding. Well rubbed edges with some board exposure, hinge wear but interiors pristine. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $290.00
Will close during Public Auction
897 c   Blockade-run cover from Bermuda, to Wetumpsa, Alabama endorsed pr. Ranger at top left, entered the Confederate mails with Wilmington, N.C.Jan 18 (1864) datestamp, matching SHIP
handstamp and light manuscript 12 due for 10c regular postagBlockade-run cover from Bermuda, to Wetumpsa, Alabama endorsed "pr. Ranger" at top left, entered the Confederate mails with "Wilmington, N.C./Jan 18" (1864) datestamp, matching "SHIP" handstamp and light manuscript "12" due for 10c regular postage and 2c ship fee, flap missing, otherwise very fine.With the blockade of southern ports by the U.S. Navy, it became necessary for the Confederates to run the blockades. The Ranger was a blockade-runner which sailed from Bermuda on 6 January, 1864 to run the blockage at Wilmington, North Carolina. The passengers and mail were landed below Wilmington. In attempting to run into Wilmington she was run ashore by a Federal blockader. The Ranger was burned to avoid capture on 11 January. (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $2,000.00
Will close during Public Auction

SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

AFRICA AND SLAVERY
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
898   [Slave Trade, 1768] Early autograph letter signed by TL Madden to Capt. Ambrose Lace, Old Calabar, November 28, 1768. I Dont know what to say but Complain of the times for
Certain it is the Never ware so Bad as Now. Cap. Washington Is just Sai[Slave Trade, 1768] Early autograph letter signed by TL Madden to Capt. Ambrose Lace, Old Calabar, November 28, 1768. "I Dont know what to say but Complain of the times for Certain it is the Never ware so Bad as Now. Cap. Washington Is just Sail'd & taken 21 pauns of & Left 11 Slaves Behind besides Coppers. Every Body that any Body Will trust is in Debt...The Dalrymple has not goods for 20 Slaves - And not 100 on Deck Exclusive of pauns...They Laugh at 120 & 30 Coppers for Slaves and Except Willy I got no Slaves from Any Budy But Them that wants there Coomey (a sort of customs duty) ...My market in America is Quite Soft & Has Been out of my Power to make great Despatch...Coomey Is Easy paid but Slaves Scarce & Very Dear." With an interesting anthropological note on verso.By 1768, Old Calabar was already in decline as a slave trading port. With collusion from English traders, its rivals at New Town had captured members of its ruling family in 1767, beheading one of them. Lace would take one of the Robin Johns to England and educate him, but the young man was later sold into slavery by a rival captain. (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $2,200.00
Will close during Public Auction
899   [Grandy King George, 1773 and 1775] Two letters, the first is unsigned, from Grandy King George, King of the Old Town Tribes at Old Calabar, an important port in present-day
Nigeria, 1773. He writes merchant Ambrose Lace about the actions of th[Grandy King George, 1773 and 1775] Two letters, the first is unsigned, from "Grandy King George," King of the Old Town Tribes at Old Calabar, an important port in present-day Nigeria, 1773. He writes merchant Ambrose Lace about the actions of the men on ships in Calabar River, particularly a pair named Bishop and Jackson, who were angry that George had sold slaves to one of their rivals."This Jackson & Bishop & a Brig...at Night began to fire At my town With Out the Least Provecation & cuntinued It for Twenty four hours for Which I gave them two [Cones?] but It Seemed as after words Jackson Confirmed that that Bishop & him Was to Cary Away all our Pawns as it was lickely true for Jackson did cary of his but more than that before he Saild he tould me that if I Went On bord of Bishop I shuld be Stoped by him & my hed Cut of & sent to the duke, at Nuetown, but I Put that out of his Power for to Cut of my hed or Cary of the Pawns by Stoping his Boat...If any ship fire at my Town, I will fire for ship Again. Marchant Lace Sr....Captn. Sharps second mate a young man & a Very good man he is Very much Liked by me & all my peeple of Callabar so if you Plase to Sand him he will make as quick a dispatch as any man...much to your Advantage for I want a good many Ships to Cum...Will this Plaver is satteld for I have Ofered him 10 Slaves to redeam the Pawns & Let him have his White Peeple but he Will Not for I dount Want to (do) y bad thing to him Or any Ship that Cums to my Water but there is 4 of my sons gone alredy with Jackson & I dont Want Any more of them Caried of by Any other Vassell."George asks Lace, who apparently had ended his father's tenure as "grandy," to send him a good ship so he can be grandy again and make peace, because war is too much for him.With a second letter, written to Lace in Liverpool from Calabar by Ephraim Robin John, Grandy George's younger brother, on December 24, 1775: "Captain Lace I take this opportunity to write you...That Letter you send me by Sharp you did not put your name...As for Captain Sharp I will do anything lys in my power to obliged you when Captain Cooper Comes let him guns enough I want 2 gun for every slave I sell and father we Don't want Iron only 2 for one slave. So no more at presant from your firend." Both letters are worn, the first affecting text at the right edge of the page. At the time of this letter, Calabar was one of the major slave trading posts on the western coast of Africa. Most of the slaves were Igbo, a people from Cameroon (mentioned in the first letter but not quoted here) and other parts of Nigeria, though Ephraim and George would not have been Igbo. There is history behind these letters. Years earlier, Grandy George and his family had vied for the slave trade with "Duke" Ephraim, at New Town until the duke, with English allies, captured George and his brothers, and cut off one of their heads. The bullying attack by Jackson, which forced George to bribe him with slaves, shows how the family had fallen in power. Old Town continued to lose importance as a trading port, and would soon lose importance entirely. As for Captain Sharp, whom the two princes of Calabar seem to have trusted, he later sold Ephraim Robin John and one of his brothers into slavery. (imagea) (Image) Est. $3,000-4,000

SOLD for $3,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
900   [Slave Trade, 1773] Amazing autograph letter signed by English slave trader Ambrose Lace, November 11, 1773, regarding two princes of Old Calabar, a port on the West African
coast, who have been sold into slavery. He writes to Thomas Jones, reply[Slave Trade, 1773] Amazing autograph letter signed by English slave trader Ambrose Lace, November 11, 1773, regarding two princes of Old Calabar, a port on the West African coast, who have been sold into slavery. He writes to Thomas Jones, replying to his letter"wherein you desire I will send an Affidavit Concerning the two blackmen you mention, Little Epm (Ephraim Robin John) & Ancoy, in what manner the ware taken off the Coast & that I know them to be Brothers to Grandy Epm. Robin John (aka Grandy George). … never found that little Epm. was one of Old Robin's Sons, and as to Rob. Rob. John he was not Old Rob. John's Son. Old Robin took Rob. Rob. Jno's mother for a wife when Robin Rob. Jno. was a boy of 6 or eight...You know the custom of that place what ever Man or Woman goes to live in any family the take the Name of the first man in the family...As to what Ship they came off the Coast in I know no more then you...As to Grandy Epm. you know very well has been Guilty of so many bad Actions no man can say any thing in his favour, a History of his life would exceed any of our Pirates...I brought young Epm. home … He cost me above Sixty pounds and when his Fathers gone I hope the Son will be a good man." A most important letter, giving important clues to the history of the West African slave trade. See the letters by Grandy George and Ephraim Robin John in this section. With an 1803 insurance agreement in the amount of 300 pounds for the sailing ship Margaret Lace from Scotland to the African coast, and thence to the West Indies. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,500.00
Will close during Public Auction

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