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WESTERN EXPANSION continued...

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Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
741 c   Michigan Central Railroad, fancy blue shield-shaped train illustrated advertisement of D.W. Whiting, general forwarder and commission merchants at Buffalo, N.Y. on 3c Red on
buff entire (U2) to Mt. Sterilng, Ill., entered the mails with DetroitMichigan Central Railroad, fancy blue shield-shaped train illustrated advertisement of D.W. Whiting, general forwarder and commission merchants at Buffalo, N.Y. on 3c Red on buff entire (#U2) to Mt. Sterilng, Ill., entered the mails with "Detroit, Mich./Sep 23" datestamp and "Steamboat in scroll handstamp, very fine. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,300.00
Will close during Public Auction
742 c   [Pacific Railroad] two covers, first with manuscript CaliforniaFeby 14 Missouri postmark on buff cover to Boston with blue train illustrated corner card of the Pacific Railroad
Co. franked by 3c Dull red (11), second with bold Pacific Railro[Pacific Railroad] two covers, first with manuscript "California/Feby 14" Missouri postmark on buff cover to Boston with blue train illustrated corner card of the Pacific Railroad Co. franked by 3c Dull red (#11), second with bold "Pacific Railroad/Jul 20" route agent's postmark tying 3c Dull red (#26) to orange cover to Franklin Mills, Ohio, also includes an 1861 Pacific Railroad pass, first with flap missing and sealed tears at top, latter slightly reduced at left, fine-very fine.On September 16, 1858, the first westbound mail was carried from Saint Louis to Tipton, Missouri by the newly constructed Pacific Railroad, a distance of one hundred and sixty miles. On arrival at Tipton at 6 PM the same day, the mail was transferred to the first westbound stage for its long journey of two thousand, seven hundred and thirty miles - the longest continuous stage line in history. The first westbound stage arrived in San Francisco on Sunday morning October 10th in the all over time of 23 days, and 23½ hours. California is the first station east of Tipton. (imagea) (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,900.00
Will close during Public Auction
743 c   Hannibal & St. Joseph R.R., Brookfield, Apr ?, 1860, mostly clear route agents postmark tying 3c Dull red (26) to buff cover to Horsehead, Maryland, light edge wear, very fine
accompanied by advertising card showing a map of the railroad and iHannibal & St. Joseph R.R., Brookfield, Apr ?, 1860, mostly clear route agent's postmark tying 3c Dull red (#26) to buff cover to Horsehead, Maryland, light edge wear, very fine; accompanied by advertising card showing a map of the railroad and its connections with the St. Joseph & Council Bluffs R.R. to the northwest and the Hannibal & Naples R.R. to the east, also 1863 and 1869 railroad passes and 1870 railroad passes of the two connection lines; the cover ex-Wyer.The Hannibal & St. Joseph R.R. was completed, across the state of Missouri, from Hannibal to St. Joseph in February of 1859. The eastern mails that were made up for the first westbound run of the Pony Express were carried over this railroad on April 3, 1860. Because of a missed connection at Detroit the mail arrived late at St. Joseph in spite of a record run by the Hannibal & St. Joseph R.R. It was 7 PM in the evening of April 3rd before the Pony got going. The first mail arrived by Pony at Sacramento on the 14th and late that same evening it arrived at San Francisco via the steamboat Antelope. This cover was carried over this railroad early in April of 1860 and at the time of the inaugural of the Pony Express. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,000-1,250

SOLD for $2,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
744 c   [Building the transcontinental railroad] cover with Union Pacific Railway Company, Engineers Office, Omaha Nebraska corner card altered in manuscript to Fort Sanders - Dakota
to Philadelphia, Pa. with 3c Rose (65) tied by blue target cancel[Building the transcontinental railroad] cover with "Union Pacific Railway Company, Engineer's Office, Omaha Nebraska" corner card altered in manuscript to "Fort Sanders - Dakota" to Philadelphia, Pa. with 3c Rose (#65) tied by blue target cancel, with matching "Fort Sanders, Dakota/Mar 13" datestamp along side, with original letter written by a member of one of the survey parties laying out the route of the Union Pacific railroad in the spring of 1868, cover opened on all sides and with corner repairs, fine usage.Fort Sanders was then in the Dakota Territory, just four months later on 10 July, 1868 it would become part of the Wyoming Territory. Bordeaux writes to his mother: ..."This party will operate much farther west than the others if the rumors which we hear are correct; we will proceed to Green River about 250 or 300 miles west of this place & will work east until we meet the other parties. Col. Hudnutt's & Mr Jon. O'Neill's parties left here this morning, the first for the North Platte & the second for Medicine Bow. Each were accompanied by two four mule teams for transporting the provisions, tents, etc., & a two mule team for conveying the instruments baggage &c; the engineers being compelled to use Shank's Mare. Their escort being ready will start tomorrow & overtake them on the way. Our party will probably leave on Monday unless detained by the weather; and the present indications are not very favorable....I have just finished my dinner which consisted of sowbelly (pork) or turkey, biscuts with butter, stewed tomatoes & apples, coffee without milk & apple pie washed down with a cup of water. This is considered very good living for this country - very substantial & flesh producing, no doubt, & we all relish it very much indeed - it will not do for us to anticipate the nature of the fare which we shall receive two months hence. We may however substitute fresh meat, such as antelope, elk, buffaloe &c for the bacon as game is said to be very plenty in the neighborhood of Green River. I have been obliged to invest $12.50 for a revolver as the Company does not furnish them this season....Bordeaux" (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $1,150.00
Will close during Public Auction
745 c   [Union Pacific Railroad - a Wyoming Station in 1869] 3c Pink entire (U58) to Butternuts, N.Y. with perfectly struck rimless Wash-A-Kie, Wy railroad station handstamp with
manuscript May 13, 1869 date and cancelled by U. P., R. R.May 13 ro[Union Pacific Railroad - a Wyoming Station in 1869] 3c Pink entire (#U58) to Butternuts, N.Y. with perfectly struck rimless "Wash-A-Kie, Wy" railroad station handstamp with manuscript "May 13, 1869" date and cancelled by "U. P., R. R./May 13" route agent's postmark, fresh and extremely fine; ex-Jarrett.Wash-A-Kie, Wyoming Territory was an express and telegraph station on the Union Pacific Railroad in Sweetwater County. It was the first station east of Red Desert, midway between Rawlins and Bitter Creek. There was no Post Office at this station and therefore this is a railroad station postmark applied at the station, the Union Pacific postmark was applied on the train. On 10 May, just three days before this cover was postmarked, the Central Pacific, building east and the Union Pacific, building west, met at Promontory, Utah, completing the first railroad across North America. (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $7,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
746 c   [Wells Fargo to Central Pacific Railroad] 3c Green on amber entire to Wings Station, N.Y. with Wells, Fargo & Co. printed frank, entered the mails with well struck Cent.
Pacific R.R.Nov 22 route agent postmark, slightly reduced at left, very f[Wells Fargo to Central Pacific Railroad] 3c Green on amber entire to Wings Station, N.Y. with Wells, Fargo & Co. printed frank, entered the mails with well struck "Cent. Pacific R.R./Nov 22" route agent postmark, slightly reduced at left, very fine; this was the western division of the transcontinental railroad from Ogden, Utah to San Francisco. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $375.00
Will close during Public Auction
747 c   California Pacific Rail Road Company, Office Vallejo, Cal., printed corner card and nearly all over map design showing the routes of the California Pacific and Central Pacific
railroads lithographed by Ezra A. Cook & Co., Chicago on 3c Green on aCalifornia Pacific Rail Road Company, Office Vallejo, Cal., printed corner card and nearly all over map design showing the routes of the California Pacific and Central Pacific railroads lithographed by Ezra A. Cook & Co., Chicago on 3c Green on amber entire to Hillsville, N.Y., indistinct route agents datestamp, very fine. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $850.00
Will close during Public Auction
748 c   [Iowa railroad collection] outstanding exhibition collection of 42 19th century covers and cards neatly mounted and written up in great detail in an album, plus a considerable amount of ancillary material including a great many railroad passes to accompany the covers, maps, illustrated letterheads and a stock certificate, the covers and cards bear virtually all different route agents postmarks from the large variety of railroads in Iowa, including usages on advertising covers and a patriotic cover, some typical stamp or cover faults, majority are fine-very fine covers and strikes; a rare opportunity for either the Iowa or railroad collector. Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
749 c   [Railway Balance], interesting collection of over 40 mostly 19th century covers and cards, mostly with route agents postmarks, but also some with railroad corner cards and four with train wreck notations, plus much ancillary material including a great many railroad passes to accompany the covers, picture post cards, maps, stock certificates and letterheads, some better covers include "Hawleyville/Housatonic R.R." tying 3c Dull red (#26), "Monrovia/B. & O. R.R./Oct 18, 1869" tying 3c Ultramarine (#114), "Mic. Central R.R., Mich." tying 3c Dull red (#11), "C. & N. W. R'way/Minnesota Junction/2 Nov. 1863" shield shaped postmark tying 3c Rose (#65), "Chic. & Burl. R.P.O./Day Line" postmark tying 2c Brown (#211) to allover advertising cover, "North Missouri R.R." tying 2c Black (#73) to name a few, some usual stamp and cover faults, most fine-very fine covers and strikes. Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $4,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
750   [1849 Proposal for a Transcontinental Railroad via New Mexico] Choice autograph letter by Capt. Enoch Steen of the US Dragoons, to Capt. JW Denver, later a powerful Democrat in
California and Kansas (see his correspondence in the California and C[1849 Proposal for a Transcontinental Railroad via New Mexico] Choice autograph letter by Capt. Enoch Steen of the US Dragoons, to Capt. JW Denver, later a powerful Democrat in California and Kansas (see his correspondence in the California and Civil War sections) shortly after the Mexican War, Dona Ana, NM, September 28, 1849. He writes:"A few words on the subject of the Great Rail Road to the Pacific Ocean. It will be of great National interest...I would say start at some point on the Mississippi River near the mouth of Red River or at some point on Red River as high up as good & safe Steam boats navegation. Thence up said River to near its head - thence west to the southern boundary of New Mexico to the Rio Gila - thence down said stream to the Colorado of the West. Thence West to San Diego on the PacificOcean. This route I have been over as fare as the Rio Gila - its all most a level plain and four degres of Longetude shorter than the route from St. Louis by the South Pass.""...I am still suffering considereble from a wound I receved in a battle I had with the Apachys Indians on the 16th August. I had 26 Dragoons...We fought about 200 Indians and for a few minutes it was allmost a hand to hand fight. The Indians gave way - we persued them...about five miles whare we took their camp - a number of their horse & mules and distroyed all their provisions pots kettles &c &c. We kild about 12 & wounded 20...I had my 1st Seargt mortally wounded - one corporal kild and 2 others Privats slightley wounded...I rec'd a ball about 2 inches below the navel. The ball lodged near the spine whare it still remains and strang to say the wound is nearly healed up...Unless the Gov. send more mounted troops in New Mexico, we will have plenty of fighting." The Gadsden Purchase, five years after this letter, was made in part to make possible a railroad to the Pacific using a route along the Gila River. The railroad would not be completed until 1881, by which time a northern route to Sacramento had long been completed. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $4,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
ABRAHAM LINCOLN
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
751   [Abraham Lincoln, Appointment] Partly engraved Document Signed Abraham Lincoln as President, 1 page, folio, on vellum, Washington, March 12, 1863. A military appointment naming
Arthur H. Mills an Assistant Quartermaster of Volunteers with the[Abraham Lincoln, Appointment] Partly engraved Document Signed "Abraham Lincoln" as President, 1 page, folio, on vellum, Washington, March 12, 1863. A military appointment naming Arthur H. Mills an "Assistant Quartermaster of Volunteers with the rank of Captain" dating back to November of the previous year. Also signed by Secretary of War "Edwin M. Stanton". With green War Department seal at upper left. Folded, overall very fine. A handsome example of its kind, with a large and bold signature. (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $8,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
752   [Abraham Lincoln sealing an Indian Treaty] Sealing the Treaty of Old Crossing, 1864. Partly printed Document Signed Abraham Lincoln as President, 1 page, 4to, Washington, May
5, 1864. He authorizes and directs the Secretary of State to affix t[Abraham Lincoln sealing an Indian Treaty] Sealing the Treaty of Old Crossing, 1864. Partly printed Document Signed "Abraham Lincoln" as President, 1 page, 4to, Washington, May 5, 1864. He authorizes and directs "the Secretary of State to affix the Seal of the United States to the Proclamation of Treaty with the Red Lake and Pembina Bands of Chippewa Indians, concluded on the 2d of October 1863." Mounting traces on verso. Minor toning and spotting. This was in fact the signing of a revised version of the 1863 treaty made with the Chippewa (Ojibwe) of northwestern Minnesota, which tribal leaders had signed while facing down Gatling guns in the distrustful atmosphere following the 1862 Sioux Uprising there. In the original version, the Ojibwe had surrendered their land for about five cents an acre. The revised version passed by the US Senate improved some terms of the treaty (raising the price to six cents per acre) but also took away most of the Native Americans' involvement in distributing the funds fairly. The result was another in a long series of treaties that gave a sheen of legitimacy to the appropriation of native lands. An extremely rare and historic item. (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $29,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
753   [Abraham Lincoln, regarding a Paymaster appointment] May 14, 1862. Autograph Note Signed A.. Lincoln as President, 23 page, 16mo (on verso of a folded octavo sheet),
Washington, May 14, 1862. He responds to an ALS from Paymaster General Benjam[Abraham Lincoln, regarding a Paymaster appointment] May 14, 1862. Autograph Note Signed "A.. Lincoln" as President, 2/3 page, 16mo (on verso of a folded octavo sheet), Washington, May 14, 1862. He responds to an ALS from Paymaster General Benjamin F. Larned, who requests that "Major J.L. Hodge an additional Paymaster has been for several months my assistant in the office, and has rendered most essential service. Should a vacancy occur in the regular Pay Dept., it would be exceedingly gratifying to me to have him appointed". President Lincoln writes that "I am willing for the appointment within indicated, to be made, so soon as it can consistently with what I have already said for others." In very good condition. There is some spotting on the letter, but the panel with Lincoln's note is exceptionally clean and will display beautifully.Among the most tiresome of Lincoln's duties as president was seeing to the mass of political appointments that at the time were his to distribute. The Executive Mansion was beset by hundreds of supplicants every day, especially in the early days of his administration. Even with the dedicated assistance of his secretaries, John Nicolay and John Hay, it was exhausting keeping up with their demands. By the time of this request, things had quieted down to a degree, and naturally the endorsement of the paymaster general himself must have had weight. (imagea) (Image) Est. $3,000-4,000

SOLD for $4,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
754   [Abraham Lincoln, Let these men take the oath] January 6, 1865. Autograph Note Signed A. Lincoln as President, 3 lines, on verso of the blank integral page of a letter signed
by James H. Embry and A.J. Mershon of Madison County, Kentucky, whi[Abraham Lincoln, "Let these men take the oath"] January 6, 1865. Autograph Note Signed "A. Lincoln" as President, 3 lines, on verso of the blank integral page of a letter signed by James H. Embry and A.J. Mershon of Madison County, Kentucky, which petitions that "Harvey Ellison, James B. Ellison and George Ellison have been confirmed as Prisoners of War for about 17 months at Camp Douglas (Chicago) Illinois. We learn that they are anxious to take the required oath and return to their homes and be loyal. Harvey Ellison is now very sick & may not recover if he is not released. They joined the Rebels in 1862 in the midst of great excitement in Ky and as we believe without properly considering the step. Their father is an honest, quiet, and industrious Citizen"President Lincoln writes as he had for so many prisoners like the Ellisons, "Let these men take the oath of Dec. 8, 1863, & be discharged" and dates his note "Jan. 6, 1865." The integral page has been clipped away save for the portion with Lincoln's note and the adjoining panel. The first page has been folded to display the note along with the beginning of the petition. Numerous classes of people were not entitled to this amnesty via an oath, including officers above colonel, officers and soldiers who resigned from the US Army to serve against it, members of the "so-called Confederate government," and those who had mistreated black prisoners of war or their commanders. (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $3,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
755   [Abraham Lincoln, Let these men take the oath] 1865. Note Signed A. Lincoln as President, 2 lines, at close of a 4-page ALS, 8vo, Washington, February 13, 1865. Body of note in
secretarys hand. Lincoln writes in response to a letter by US Re[Abraham Lincoln, "Let these men take the oath"] 1865. Note Signed "A. Lincoln" as President, 2 lines, at close of a 4-page ALS, 8vo, Washington, February 13, 1865. Body of note in secretary's hand. Lincoln writes in response to a letter by US Representative from Illinois W.R. Morrison, written on Executive Mansion stationery, February 7, 1865, regarding "The following named Prisoners of War, through their friends, say they are penitent and ask me to intercede with you in their behalf, ask that they may be allowed to take the oath and return home to their friends. Eli M. Gilbert confined at Johnsons Island has a wife & children in Monroe Co Ills. Of which he is a native. John M. Crowell confined at Elmira NY was a Telegraph operator for Rebels. Has a mother brothers & sisters in Monroe Co. Ills of which he is a native. These two were at work in the South when war broke out. Calvin Mitchell confined at Point Lookout has brothers & sisters in Randolph Co. Ills who are persons of good standing & pledge that he will keep faith."Lincoln directs, "Let these men take the oath of Dec. 8. 1863 and be discharged." Partial split at hinge, stain on last page far from signature, overall soiling and minor wear. No doubt Morrison arrived at the White House with his request and was asked to write it out on the President's stationery so that it could be officially endorsed. An uncommon form of one of the more familiar Lincoln documents. (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $3,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
756   [Abraham Lincoln, Ohio forces] 1861 Autograph Note Signed A.L. on verso of the blank integral page of an Autograph Letter Signed by (future Supreme Court Justice) Noah H.
Swayne of Columbus, Ohio, who has written to Secretary of War Simon Camer[Abraham Lincoln, Ohio forces] 1861 Autograph Note Signed "A.L." on verso of the blank integral page of an Autograph Letter Signed by (future Supreme Court Justice) Noah H. Swayne of Columbus, Ohio, who has written to Secretary of War Simon Cameron, "Mr. A. V. Barring of this place has been appointed commissary to Gen. Schleighs brigade of Ohio Volunteeers. He has warned that the appointment to be of any validity must be made by you. I can commend him as a gentleman of energy intelligence worth and high character." Endorsed at close by Henry B. Carrington, former adjutant general of Ohio, John A. Gurley, US Senator "B.F. Wade" and US Representative "John A. Gurley."President Lincoln, crushed by the rush of office-seekers just three months after taking office, writes simply and without committing himself, "When Commissaries shall be appointed for Ohio forces, this case must be carefully considered." Closed tear passing through first three lines of note but not affecting legibility. Age-toned, with notable fold wear including partial separations, some reinforced with paper. A curious request, as we cannot find any record of a General Schleigh. Possibly he had failed to raise the brigade he had hoped to form in the patriotic excitement of the war's first weeks. Early in 1862, Lincoln would appoint Swayne to the US Supreme Court; Swayne was replacing his own mentor, the late Justice John McLean. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $2,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
757 c   [Abraham Lincoln Free Frank] on mourning cover, bold A. Lincoln frank as President on small cover addressed in the hand of Mary Todd Lincoln to the wife of Senator Ira Harris
of New York in New York City, double circle Washington, D.C.Apr[Abraham Lincoln Free Frank] on mourning cover, bold "A. Lincoln" frank as President on small cover addressed in the hand of Mary Todd Lincoln to the wife of Senator Ira Harris of New York in New York City, double circle "Washington, D.C./Apr 8, 1862" postmark, extremely fine; fewer than five mourning covers are known franked by Lincoln for his wife after the death of their son William in February of 1862.Lincoln's third son, Willie, died on 20 February, 1862 after an illness that was probably typhoid fever. Upon his death Lincoln said: "My poor boy. He was too good for this earth. God has called him home. I know that he is much better off in heaven, but then we loved him so. It is hard, hard to have him die!" He was buried in Georgetown, but upon his father's assassination was exhumed and put on Lincoln's funerary train to Springfield, where he was buried next to his father.When the Lincolns attended Ford Theater, the night of April 14th, they were accompanied by Major Henry R. Rathbone and his fiance Clara Harris, the daughter of Madam Harris to whom the cover is addressed. When J. Wilkes Booth sent a small ball of lead crashing into the brain of Abraham Lincoln he set in motion a series of tragic events that would affect him and the others in the box. Ten years later, Mary Todd Lincoln was declared insane and died on July 15, 1882. Rathbone married Clara Harris, and while in Germany supervising the education of their three children, he became insanely jealous of his wife and on Christmas Eve 1883, he killed her and shot himself. He recovered and was committed to an asylum for the criminally insane at Hildesheim, Germany where he died on August 14, 1911. In one of the greatest manhunts in American history, Booth was run down and cornered in a barn by the 16th New York Cavalry. When he refused to surrender, the barn was set on fire and he was shot and killed by Sergeant Boston Corbett on April 27, 1865. (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $24,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
758   [Lincoln Inauguration - Arthur Sterry] There is something honest & pleasant in his face, the character of a man who knows his own mind & sticks to it. Interesting group of
three long letters and a lengthy diary, all by British lawyer Arthur[Lincoln Inauguration - Arthur Sterry] "There is something honest & pleasant in his face, the character of a man who knows his own mind & sticks to it." Interesting group of three long letters and a lengthy diary, all by British lawyer Arthur Sterry during his trip to the United States and Canada, 1860-61. In Boston a few weeks before the presidential election, he witnesses a gathering of Wide-Awakes, supporters of Lincoln: "The procession must have numbered many thousand. They marched from all directions to the 'Common'...& there joined forces. It was a pretty sight to see them pouring in from every quarter, armed (for the most part) with a coloured lamp held suspended from a stick." He reaches Washington in February 1861 and takes rooms at Willard's Hotel, "amusing myself principally by listening to the debates. Washington is a strange piece of patchwork. The public buildings scattered about are handsome, but the city generally is far from being so. The show street, Pennsylvania Avenue, has the width" that would shame Broadway and the main streets of Philadelphia, "but it has nothing else to recommend it." He admires the Capitol, and describes it in detail (in the years before its dome was erected), especially the Rotunda's "pictures representing scenes in the history of America, some of them, such as Burgoyne's surrender at Saratoga & Cornwallis' at Yorktown not to flattering to an Englishman's pride."He watches both chambers of Congress, commenting on the ladies' galleries and the congressional provision of spittoons, travels into Virginia to visit the Natural Bridge, and returns in time for Abraham Lincoln's arrival: "The President-elect is now here, & occupies rooms in this Hotel...I caught a glimpse of him as I was coming out of Church this morning, but had only time to see that he is very tall & (apparently) very ugly. 'Ain't he a good lookin' one!; was a remark I overheard one bystander make...Washington is tremendously full now."Sterry attends the inauguration (described in full detail), where "before long 'Uncle Abe' made his appearance, accompanied by Senators, friends & other, and also by the Diplomatic Corps...whose handsome uniforms were in striking contrast with the plain black suit of the President...When all was quiet Lincoln...in a clear distinct voice read his inaugural address, in which, as it seemed to me he took a very good position...Lincoln did not seem to me quite so gaunt & ungainly as he has been represented...He is very tall...& if not ugly is in the approach to it. For all that there is something honest & pleasant in his face, the character of a man who knows his own mind & sticks to it. His speech was listened to in deep silence, broken only by here & there an exclamation of approval & by an occasional burst of applause."With Book: Exposition of the "KGC Knights of the Golden Circle or a History of Secession from 1834 to 1861" Anonymous. Indianapolis, Clarke & Co, 1861. 12mo, illustrated paper wraps. Worn but intact.Sterry later travels to Savannah, New Orleans, St. Joseph, MO, St. Paul, New York, Niagara Falls, and Ottawa City, and gives insightful and witty accounts of each. All items are in perfect condition, though the diary pages are unbound. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,400.00
Will close during Public Auction
759 c   Lincoln mourning fancy cancellation, stars negative design and matching Albany, N.Y.Oct 17 datestamp over the free frank of Senator Ira Harris, addressed to Canoga, N.Y., cover
with sealed opening tear at top center, very fine strike.This negaLincoln mourning fancy cancellation, stars negative design and matching "Albany, N.Y./Oct 17" datestamp over the free frank of Senator Ira Harris, addressed to Canoga, N.Y., cover with sealed opening tear at top center, very fine strike.This negative cancel in black was created by the Albany, N. Y. post office following the assassination of Lincoln. So far it is only known used in 1865 after Lincoln's death. It is usually used on the 3c 1861 stamp and is scarce on cover but very rare on a stampless free-franked cover. Senator Ira Harris was the father of Clara Harris. (see lot #757) (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $2,300.00
Will close during Public Auction
760 c   Lincoln & Hamlin portrait design by Carpenter and Allen of Boston on yellow cover to Providence, R.I. with 3c Dull red (26) cancelled by waffle grid, matching Sandwich, Ms.Nov
20 datestamp alongside, fresh and very fine illustrated in MilgLincoln & Hamlin portrait design by Carpenter and Allen of Boston on yellow cover to Providence, R.I. with 3c Dull red (#26) cancelled by waffle grid, matching "Sandwich, Ms./Nov 20" datestamp alongside, fresh and very fine; illustrated in Milgrim on page 62. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $2,200.00
Will close during Public Auction

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