• Login Password

    Please Login. You are NOT Logged in.

Login to Use StampAuctionNetwork.
New Member? Click "Register".

StampAuctionNetwork Channels

Help:



 
You are not logged in. Please Login so that we can determine your registration status with this firm. If you have never registered, please register and check the box for this auction firm if you want to bid with them. Then Login. Listen to Live Audio!
 
logo

WESTERN EXPANSION continued...

THE MORMONS AND UTAH continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
541   [The Prophets Wife and Brother give statements on property stolen in the 1838 Mormon War], Emma Smith and Hyrum Smith. Remarkable pair of Documents Signed respectively by Emma
Smith, first wife of the Mormon prophet Joseph Smith, and by Hyrum[The Prophet's Wife and Brother give statements on property stolen in the 1838 Mormon War], Emma Smith and Hyrum Smith. Remarkable pair of Documents Signed respectively by "Emma Smith," first wife of the Mormon prophet Joseph Smith, and by "Hyrum Smith," his brother and member of his inner circle. Both are 2 pages, legal folio, Nauvoo, IL, April 22, 1842. Each gives a deposition in the case of Joseph Smith v. George M. Hinkle, a former follower of Smith's, concerning property that Hinkle took possession of in Far West, Missouri, undoubtedly as part of the deal he had made with the Missouri militia during the "Mormon War" there. The case is being tried in Lee County, Iowa Territory. Mrs. Smith testifies that: "I know of Deft. Having taken a Horse, Saddle, Bridle, Martingales, & two Horse Blankets, Pltfs property, value two hundred Dollars, about the 1st day of November 1838." (Curiously, this date is corrected in the text from October 24). "Also about the same time dry Goods to the value of Fifty Dollars, also articles of clothing and Household Furniture value about one hundred and fifty Dollars, this took place in Far West, Caldwell County, Missouri." She adds that she had gone "with my Children to the House of George W. Harris in Far West to which place Deft. Came shortly afterwards upon the same day, & expressed much Surprize at my being there, & that I had not left the Country, & ordered me to do so, and shortly after Deft. Had went off, I was informed that Deft. Was carrying off Plaintiffís goods."Hyrum Smith admits that he had no knowledge of Hinkle taking the goods in question, but adds in explanation that "On or about the first day of November 1838, the Deft. Came to the House of witness with an armed force, & took Witness & compelled Witness to go by force of Arms about a Mile from Far West, unto Goose Creek, where Witness was placed under a Strong Guard in the Camp of the Mob. I there heard the Deft. Say unto (apostle) Lyman Wight, that he Deft. Had taken the Pltfs. Horse, Saddle, Bridle, & Martingales, & had sold them to Capt. Samuel Bogart. I immediately informed the Pltf. Who was under Guard & Convenient to me In about two days Pltf. With Witness & others were carried to Jackson County were kept there five or Six days, from there we were taken to Richmond Ray County, there kept about twenty Days, then carried to Liberty Clay County," and that in that time Bogart guarded them, and Hyrum saw him with his brother's possessions. (imagea) (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $37,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
542   [Missouri Mormon War, Smith v Hinkle] Outstanding group of 24 documents signed by lawyers and deponents in the case of Joseph Smith v. George M. Hinkle, 1841-42, in consequence
of events during the Mormon War in Missouri, 1838, when Hinkle helped[Missouri Mormon War, Smith v Hinkle] Outstanding group of 24 documents signed by lawyers and deponents in the case of Joseph Smith v. George M. Hinkle, 1841-42, in consequence of events during the Mormon War in Missouri, 1838, when Hinkle helped negotiate peace with the Latter-day Saints' neighbors at the cost of giving up the leaders of the movement, including Smith. According to Smith's side of the lawsuit, Hinkle profited personally and wound up with many of Smith's possessions. Most are signed by John Bennett, mayor of Nauvoo but also "commissioner" in the case, who took the depositions. Some others are signed by Richard Reeves, Smith's attorney in Iowa, where the case was tried. The depositions are also signed respectively by Reynolds Cahoon, Thomas Grover, George W. Harris, Lucinda Harris, Elias Higbee, Caroline Huntington, Vinson Knight, Amasa Lyman, Alanson Ripley, George W. Robinson, John Scott, Henry G. Sherwood, John Taylor, and Lyman Wight.Part of his Smith's complaint: "Defendant was indebted to the said plaintiff for divers goods challtes to wit 1000 books of the value of fifteen hundred dollars 6 horses and mares of the value of three hundred dollars and divers other...goods...there and then sold and delivered by the plaintiff to the defendant... (who) promised to pay...so much as said goods...were reasonably worth...Plaintiff avers that the said...are worth two thousand dollars...Defendant was further indebted...in the further sum of fifteen hundred dollars for goods...sold and delivered and also in the further sum of fifteen hundred dollars for money lent and also in the further sum of fifteen hundred dollars for money had and received...for the use of the said plaintiff and also in the further sum of fifteen hundred dollars for money paid...for the use of the defendant...and also in the further sum of fifteen hundred dollars for work and labor performed...by said plaintiff." Clearly Smith was in the habit of handing out fifteen hundred dollars at a time, in an age when $1500 was equivalent to nearly $40,000 today!Though Hinkle was seen as a betrayer, especially by Smith, he maintained that Smith and the other Mormon leaders surrendered voluntarily in order to save the community from destruction at the hands of an increasingly deadly Missouri mob. (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $37,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
543 c   [Far West, Missouri] Far West Mo., Apl 10 (1839) bold red semi-circular postmark and matching straightline Free on folded letter with integral address leaf to Danville,
Illinois, few internal splits, still fresh and extremely fine one of few[Far West, Missouri] "Far West Mo., Apl 10" (1839) bold red semi-circular postmark and matching straightline "Free" on folded letter with integral address leaf to Danville, Illinois, few internal splits, still fresh and extremely fine; one of fewer than five examples recorded.In 1838 a large group of Mormons settled in a little-inhabited region of northwest Missouri. They established their own county of Caldwell with Far West as the county seat. With increasing numbers the Mormons spilled over into adjacent counties, which resulted in a multitude of incidents which led to a little civil war between the Saints and gentiles. On the threat by the Governor of Missouri to have the state Militia "Expel or exterminate them," the Saints decided to pick up and go back to Illinois. In the meantime General Lucas of the militia had arrested Joseph Smith and other leaders of the church. They were tried by a court-martial and ordered to be shot for treason in the public square of Far West. Alexander Doniphan, who was to win fame in the Mexican War, was called upon to execute the condemned but refused. He wrote General Lucas that "It is cold-blooded murder. I will not obey your order. My brigade shall march for Liberty tomorrow morning at 8 o'clock, and if you execute these men I will hold you responsible before an earthly tribunal, so help me God." The order was never executed and the prisoners were permitted to escape. Most of the Mormons took the steamboat route down the Missouri and up the Mississippi to Quincy. The last of the Saints left Far West on April 20, 1839, just ten days after this cover was postmarked. (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $4,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
544   [Commerce (Nauvoo), Illinois], A lengthy content letter by James Moses from Commerce, Ill., which was about to become Nauvoo, May 31, 1840. Address panel of integral sheet
bears a Type I Nauvoo postmark for June, with the day 19 added by hand[Commerce (Nauvoo), Illinois], A lengthy content letter by James Moses from "Commerce, Ill.," which was about to become Nauvoo, May 31, 1840. Address panel of integral sheet bears a Type I Nauvoo postmark for June, with the day "19" added by hand. Moses writes his cousin Alonzo in Ashtabula County, Ohio, about his chosen faith: "You informed me...that you considered the Mormons to be deluded people...at least the great majority...the minority impostors & hypocrits...Dear sir if a firm belief in the Gospel of a crucified and risen redeemer as manifested to all nations & as recorded in their sacred writings is delusion then I am deluded. If refusing to fellowship the modern systems of sectarianism which are entirely contrary to the pure doctrines of the bible is delusion then I must acknowledge that I am..."He goes on to accuse his former faith of superstition. The Mormons have been persecuted, and "their blood has flowed to test the depths of their sincerity." He says of one controversial tenet, "The destruction of the Gentile nations expressed in your letter as being an item of our doctrine I will refer you to the scriptures and will only say that the remnants of Israel are all among the gentiles as a sign of the second advent of the saviour and in the last days will be restored to the lands anciently possessed by their fathers."He turns to less stressful topics and says he has married and may cross the Mississippi into Iowa to take up farming again. The region "is a pleasant Country and an excellent part of land. The Brethren of the Church that are living in Commerce are generally those that were driven from the State of Mo...In Commerce and near there is probably from three to five thousand."Ink stains on all pages, especially the second and third, which Moses explains are from an upset inkwell. This affects a few words but text is still fully decipherable. Hundreds of Mormons evicted from Missouri had been given shelter by the people of Quincy, Illinois. Soon many began to resettle in the nearly deserted nearby village of Commerce, which was surrounded by swamps. Released from confinement in Missouri, Joseph Smith arrived in May 1839 and renamed the place "Nauvoo," meaning "beautiful" in Hebrew. In the spring of 1840 Smith and his advisors completed the town's charter, which the state quickly accepted, and Mormons began to pour in and develop it into one of Illinois' most beautiful and prosperous cities. (imagea) (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $4,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
545   [Description of Nauvoos Growth], Good content letter by O. McKean of Carthage, Illinois, September 10, 1840. McKean and his wife write to his brother James and his wife in
Bradford County, PA. He reports on the dangers of the frontier: One band[Description of Nauvoo's Growth], Good content letter by O. McKean of Carthage, Illinois, September 10, 1840. McKean and his wife write to his brother James and his wife in Bradford County, PA. He reports on the dangers of the frontier: "One band of thieves was in a shoot-out with the sheriff and a posse of twenty men. They killed six of the Robers & 5 of the Sheriff's men but took the prisoners and have them deposited in Jail." There is also news about their new neighbors. "I must give you a Statement of the prosperity of the Mormans. Within 18 miles of this place there is a city a Building of Mormans called Nauvoo. They commenced last fall and know have about three hundred & fifty dwellings and perhaps two thousand inhabitance. Last week they had a great meting and baptised 50 persons. They have two stores & 2 public Houses. There emigration is about ten a day. I was in there city yesterday & the like I never saw, buildings going up in every direction. There city is laid out three miles square on the Mississippi River a very handsome location."Fold wear with very minor splitting, seal hole affecting one word. With much interesting additional content. (imagea) (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $3,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
546   Smith, Joseph and Hyrum, 1841, Rare Document Signed Joseph Smith and Hyrum Smith, 1 page, 4to, Nauvoo, Illinois, January 25, 1841, regarding purchase of steamboat Nauvoo. An
indenture: between Joseph Smith, Hyrum Smith, Peter Haws, VinsonSmith, Joseph and Hyrum, 1841, Rare Document Signed "Joseph Smith" and "Hyrum Smith," 1 page, 4to, Nauvoo, Illinois, January 25, 1841, regarding purchase of steamboat Nauvoo. An indenture: "between Joseph Smith, Hyrum Smith, Peter Haws, Vinson Knight and George Miller of the first part and Edwin Guthrie of the second part in consideration of the sum of twelve hundred and twenty six dollars and six cents to them to be paid have this day bargained and sold the one undivided sixth part of the Steam Boat Nauvoo together with two keels and one yawl."Signed by the Smiths, Haws, Knight, and Miller at close. One fold reinforced with paper on verso. Original ink blot at upper right affecting text but not harming legibility. Smith, Joseph - American religious leader (1805-44); founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; in 1827 he reported that he had been visited by an angel and led to a lost section of the Bible detailing the history of a tribe of Israel in North America; he soon gathered a growing flock of followers; obliged to move several times, he established a thriving community at Nauvoo, Illinois; after disaffected Mormons published a newspaper accusing him of polygamy and of trying to establish a theocracy, he had their offices destroyed; while under arrest for this crime, he was murdered by an anti-Mormon mob. His brother Hyrum (1800-44) was one another leader of the church, and was murdered along with him. The men who owned the steamboat Nauvoo in partnership with Joseph and Hyrum were three of the most prominent men in Nauvoo, all of them heavily interested in various schemes of development in addition to the present one. Miller was the third man to be ordained a bishop in the Latter-day Saints Church, and Knight was one of the bishops of Nauvoo. After Knight's death in 1842, his widow became one of Smith's plural wives. Miller would later chafe under Brigham Young's leadership during the westward trek to Utah; he and apostle Lyman Wight led a splinter group to Texas, but Miller left them, too, joining another breakaway faction in Wisconsin. (Image) Est. $7,500-10,000

SOLD for $72,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
547   [Nauvoo, Letter to Smith  Young  Kimble] Mysterious autograph letter signed by prominent Latter-day Saint John Vance, addressed to Mr. Joseph Smith  B. Young or H. Kimble
Nauvoo, January 28, 1842, concerning some unexplained business that[Nauvoo, Letter to Smith / Young / Kimble] Mysterious autograph letter signed by prominent Latter-day Saint John Vance, addressed to "Mr. Joseph Smith / B. Young or H. Kimble / Nauvoo," January 28, 1842, concerning some unexplained business that Vance does not spell out, having "written cautiously for certain reasons." He writes:"In relation to the subject presented by Bros. Young & Kemble, I have been carefully feeling of Mr._______. I find that but one thing can effect the object. That is cash up, say 500$ so far as I have been able to learn him. I will see him again shortly & either be out or write again. If you have any further instructions, write or send down & I will do what I can." Preserved by heavy silking. Macomb is in McDonough County, immediately to the west of Hancock County, where Nauvoo is located. Many of its citizens would later join in pressuring the Mormons to leave Illinois - or else! Possibly Vance was simply looking to buy out a Macomb resident, for that was Joseph Smith's preferred method for ridding his people of unfriendly neighbors. However, the secrecy of the letter points to something potentially darker. Worthy of much further research. (imagea) (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $3,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
548   [The Destructive influence of Mormonism], Nauvoo. Interesting content pair of letters by Presbyterian missionaries in Iowa to Rev. Milton Badger, the secretary of the American
Home Missionary Society, in New York. The first, from Dubuque, Iowa[The "Destructive influence of Mormonism"], Nauvoo. Interesting content pair of letters by Presbyterian missionaries in Iowa to Rev. Milton Badger, the secretary of the American Home Missionary Society, in New York. The first, from Dubuque, Iowa Territory, April 5, 1842, is by John C. Holbrook. He complains of "the destructive influence of MORMONISM. Every minister knows that whenever God's people are revived, & put forth special efforts for the salvation of sinners, then the Devil stirs up his instruments to promote a revival of his work. Sometimes he uses Universalists; sometimes Infidels, & sometimes the Mormons."A Mormon had been interrupting the missionary's prayer meetings, addressing the congregation "to enlighten them in the mysteries of that system, & with the revelations" said to have been vouchsafed to Joe Smith, the prophet of 'the latter day Saints.'" The man had come to the mission for enlightenment, but it seems that Holbrook's doctrines could not attract him, for he would announce at the close of meetings that "There will be preaching...by one of the Elders of Israel, commonly called Mormons." Holbrook especially despises the doctrine that "literally NOW, 'signs shall follow them that believe,' &c., 'they shall speak with new tongues - shall lay hands on the sick & they shall recover' & that these are the evidences of real faith. They profess to perform these miracles." He goes on to complain in less indignant terms about competition from Catholics. Emendations throughout in ink show that this letter was adapted for use by the Missionary Society in one of its publications. Bottom fourth cleanly detached, with partial splits at other folds. The second letter, by J.A. Clark, Fort Madison, Iowa Territory, December 6, 1842, complains of the difficulty creating a lasting community on the frontier, but boasts that Clark's church has doubled in size. However, he must make "a very important point. I know of none in the territory more so & that presents more flattering prospects for ministerial success. The beast has already looked upon it with a covetous eye & Lieutenant Genral prophet Joe arrogantly claims it as his." He explains that the spot is below the rapids, where steamboats can visit longer into the cold season than points further north (presumably including Nauvoo). Fold wear including minor splitting. With a "Fort Madison / i.T." postmark. (imagea) (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $3,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
549   [The Death of Joseph Smith] An exciting content letter just days before Smiths murder, written to Rev. M. Badger of the American Home Missionary Society in New York by Rev.
J.T. Tucker of Hannibal, MO, June 20, 1844. While he labors on despite p[The Death of Joseph Smith] An exciting content letter just days before Smith's murder, written to Rev. M. Badger of the American Home Missionary Society in New York by Rev. J.T. Tucker of Hannibal, MO, June 20, 1844. While he labors on despite privation, "the world, the flesh & the devil are driving on their projects of sin and ruin...One grand device of Satan is just now being exploded in our neighborhood with a terrible noise and stench. The Mormon camp is in dire confusion, a party having sprung up in its midst who are preaching a reformation from the abominations of Smith, whom they brand a 'fallen Prophet,' fallen from his high estate, and now, as they say, 'an incarnate fiend'. They have stripped the prophets cloak off most unceremoniously and the pollutions concealed beneath are too vile for repetition. Mob violence AMONG THEMSELVES has followed this Exposure. And the prospect is that the scenes of Missouri will be repeated in the expulsion of this miserable sect from their present location." (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $5,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
550   [Mormon Prophet Murdered] Book: Supplement to the Millennial Star, August 1844. 8vo, 16 pages, no wraps. It announces in an Address to the Saints  Beloved Saints, In a strange
and melancholy garb, we have been led this month to print a supp[Mormon Prophet Murdered] Book: Supplement to the Millennial Star, August 1844. 8vo, 16 pages, no wraps. It announces in an "Address to the Saints / Beloved Saints, In a strange and melancholy garb, we have been led this month to print a supplement to the STAR. But why these tokens of woe and mourning?...The Prophet of the Lord in the last days, together with his brother Hyrum, have been MURDERED." In choice condition. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $1,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
551   [Nauvoo, Non-Mormon Letters] Three interesting letters from non-Mormons in and around Nauvoo. One from Nauvoo in February 1844 (postmarked address leaf) boasts that Nauvoo
...is a smart child for its age. I suppose that Nauvoo is the most civi[Nauvoo, Non-Mormon Letters] Three interesting letters from non-Mormons in and around Nauvoo. One from Nauvoo in February 1844 (postmarked address leaf) boasts that "Nauvoo ...is a smart child for its age. I suppose that Nauvoo is the most civil city in the west. But the great net has gathered all kinds of fish...Who will the Mor. vote for for President, well thay have nominated Joseph Smith. They are fools, do they Suppose they can elect him..." Another, from Independence, MO, 1843, reports that "Jo. Smith the Mormon prophet whipt a collector of Taxes at Nauvoo the Mormon Citty most d__dnably." The third (damaged) is to William Clayton in Nauvoo from Hugh Rhoads in Illinois about selling and buying land. With a postcard Photograph of the first Nauvoo post office. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $15,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
552   [Olive Frost, plural wife of Joseph Smith and Brigham Young], You will perhaps say that our prophet is a false prophet...It is not so. This is the work of God.Exceptional
content Autograph Letter Signed Olive G. Frost, 3 pages, 4to, Nauvoo, I[Olive Frost, plural wife of Joseph Smith and Brigham Young], "You will perhaps say that our prophet is a false prophet...It is not so. This is the work of God."Exceptional content Autograph Letter Signed "Olive G. Frost," 3 pages, 4to, Nauvoo, IL, March 12, 1844. To her uncle, Capt. Joshua Grey, in New Orleans, she reports that:"Since I saw you I have traveled ten thousand miles by sea and land. I left my dear Father and Mother and spent two years in England with my Brother in law P.P. Pratt and sister Mary Ann Pratt, who were Missionarys to that country. But through the mercees of God my life has been spared (to) return to my own Native land and now residing in the Citty of Nauvoo with my Father and Mother and two youngest sisters. They are living in the same house with my Brother in law Pratt. We are all well. It is a fine Citty here only 4 years old menny hundred houses about ten thousands inhabitants nearly all belonging to the same Church an you will perhaps say that we are all a deluded people and our Prophet a false Prophet. But dear uncle it is not so, this is the work of God, we read in Joshua about the Lord would proceed to do a marvelous work and a wonder the wisdom of wise should perish &c. I believe this to be the work of God and that He has spoken from the Heavens in these last days and restored the priesthood as in ancient days, and that Joseph Smith is a prophet of God. I also sent you a Book of Mormon. A coppy from the records that Joseph Smith found which were hid up by a people who peopled this continant years before it were discovered by Columbus and Christ appeared to this and that Book is a record of that people. We read in palmns that truth should spring out of the Earth &c &c This may seem strong to you but I ashour you it is the truth of heaven." She invites him to visit now that boats are traveling regularly from New Orleans on the Mississippi River, adding that, "We have a fine view of the river about a mile from the river on a piece of ground near the Temple. …" Frost, Olive Grey (1816-45) had been a missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, traveling to England with her sister, Mary Ann, who was married to one of Joseph Smith's original apostles, Parley P. Pratt. Sometime after their return to Nauvoo in 1843 and Smith's death on June 27, 1844, Olive became the prophet's thirty-fourth wife. According to some authorities, Mary Ann was also married to the prophet at the same time. Remarkably, the present letter makes no mention of her marriage to Smith, though he would be killed in just a few months. It is said that Olive went mad with grief when her husband's body was brought back from Carthage. Five months after being widowed, she became the eleventh wife of Smith's eventual successor, Brigham Young. Olive had been wed to Smith for eternity and to Young for life; thus she would remain Young's wife until death, at which time she would join Joseph Smith in the celestial kingdom. It would not take long, for Olive had never enjoyed robust health and died, probably of malaria, on October 6, 1845, at age 28. Letter has two minor tears repaired with transparent paper, seal hole affecting one line, with some staining, but is very good overall. (imagea) (Image) Est. $7,500-10,000

SOLD for $60,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
553   [Death of Joseph Smith], Important content letter by Agnes B. Berry of Waterloo, Missouri, not far west of Nauvoo, Illinois. On July 2, five days after the murder of Joseph and
Hyrum Smith, she writes to Mary McKinney in Cincinnati:Our little[Death of Joseph Smith], Important content letter by Agnes B. Berry of Waterloo, Missouri, not far west of Nauvoo, Illinois. On July 2, five days after the murder of Joseph and Hyrum Smith, she writes to Mary McKinney in Cincinnati:"Our little village was thrown into great excitement a few day back, the people from Warsaw (Illinois) sent an express who arrived at 12 o'clock on Thursday night, rouse'd the inhabitants here with the ringing of Bell's...to come to their assistance against the Mormons. That morning Joe Smith and two or three of his followers deliver'd themselves up to the Governor, who then had several thousand men with him. They put them in jail in Carthage and in the absence of the Governor who had gone to Nauvoo, a company of 50 men from Warsaw went into the jail and kill'd Joe and two of his men. A Dr. Richardson (Willard Richards) escaped unhurt, and I am told he is one of their most influential men."Another of the group, John Taylor, was seriously injured but survived; only Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum were killed."They sent in great hast for the Gov. who lost no time in getting to Carthage and when he discover'd the deed they had committed, he immediately disband'd the troop's, and was himself missing." Apparently fearing reprisal, "there never was such a distressing time known, Women and Children screaming and the perpetrators of the deed at a loss what to do and the Warsaw people more alarm'd than even those at Carthage. Immediately they sent to Mo. for help. The news came here 6 or 8 hours after the outrage was commited."Men from the area guarded the town from attack, but none came, and so many citizens had fled that the vigil was called off. Seal tear in third page; fold wear including minor splits. Integral address panel with a manuscript "Alexandria, Mo. / July 3" postmark and "25" rate. (imagea) (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $19,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
554   [Death of Joseph Smith] Uncommonly sober content letter by John L. Cross of Jerseyville, Illinois, September 6, 1844. He writes to his son, John C. Cross, in Somerset County,
NJ, about rains and flood that have devastated the area, with Every th[Death of Joseph Smith] Uncommonly sober content letter by John L. Cross of Jerseyville, Illinois, September 6, 1844. He writes to his son, John C. Cross, in Somerset County, NJ, about rains and flood that have devastated the area, with "Every thing destroyed, a great many good Houses & Barns...swept of, their crops of every kind gone with all fruit trees, the best of Orchards destroyed, their fences entirely swept of...their stock chiefly drowned." It seems Cross has escaped the worst of it. However, "We had a wonderful time here in June last with the Mormans. There was a printing press sat up in a town three or four miles from Nauvoo, the Mormans City. They printed some pieces against the Mormans that gave offence to some of the leaders of them. Joe Smith their Prophet his Brother with some others of the leaders went with a mob and pulled down the office, destroyed the press and all that was in the office. Joe, his brother, and two others was prosecuted, taken and put in prison. Joe sent for the Governer to come and see that he was protected. The Governer went and ordered a guard of fifty men to be kept round the prison till he could have a hearing in Court, but he was not long then till there was a very strong Mob appeared, all in disguise ordered the Guard to make no resistance on the perril of their lives. Mob went to the grates and fired. kill'd Joe, and his Brother, wounded one (John Taylor),the fourth prisoner (Willard Richards) hid till the prison was opened then made his escape. It was a verry fortunate affair for there was as many as three thousand men on a side all acquipt for action. If that had been the case there would have been many lives lost. I do not hear that there has been much of a stir made to find out who the Mob were. Since that time it seems to be peaceable."Seal hole affecting three lines on first and third pages (not near Smith content); light edge and fold wear. According to most accounts of the attack on the Carthage Jail where Joseph and Hyrum Smith were being held, the attackers blackened their faces to disguise their identities. Upon surrendering to authorities, Joseph had said that he was going "like a lamb to slaughter," but it did not prevent him from concealing a pistol that he reportedly used to defend himself. Some versions say he was shot in the back while in others he jumps out his cell window to his death. The uninjured Richards apparently hid behind the heavy cell door when the mob forced it open, and fled once they dispersed. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $5,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
555   [Death of Joseph Smith], Interesting content letter by J.E. Johnson of Macedonia, Illinois, May 25, 1845. To friends in Freedonia, NY, he pens, The trial of the Murderers of
the Smiths came on yesterday. The jury was made Mostly out of persons[Death of Joseph Smith], Interesting content letter by J.E. Johnson of Macedonia, Illinois, May 25, 1845. To friends in Freedonia, NY, he pens, "The trial of the Murderers of the Smiths came on yesterday. The jury was made Mostly out of persons implicated as being accessory to the Murder. They will undoubtedly be acquitted altho the Evidence is positive & pointed against them. The Mob have been endeavoring to raise a fuss, but their time for that seems to have passed. Nauvoo is rapidly increasing. The capstone was yesterday laid on the Temple. Tis a sublime & curious structure." Five men were tried for the murder of the Smith brothers, but the jury was composed entirely of non-Mormons and readily acquitted them. No one was ever brought to justice for the attack. Fine. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $10,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
556   [Mob War in 1845], Highly desirable content letter by F.C. Moore of Quincy, Illinois, September 17, 1845. He reports to John Pierce in New York that: We shall probably have a
very serious war with the Mormons in Hancock County, which has comme[Mob War in 1845], Highly desirable content letter by F.C. Moore of Quincy, Illinois, September 17, 1845. He reports to John Pierce in New York that: "We shall probably have a very serious war with the Mormons in Hancock County, which has commenced by burning the Mormon dwellings, and yesterday the Mormons shot a respectable Anti-Mormon by name of (Franklin) Worrell. Some 50 houses have been burnt near the line of this county. …The fact is, the Mormons out vote the old citizens & have the contract of all the offices, and justice cannot be obtained in that county. The Eastern papers have no idea of the state of annarchy in that county. It is said that (Mormon supporter Jacob) Backenstos the Sheriff of Hancock shot Mr. Worrell. By tomorrow I expect we shall have bloody news from that region. A number of Mormon families have fled to this city for safety, and so sure as they congregate here, we shall have fighting. The Mormons sent an express to Gov. [Thomas] Ford, calling on him for aid. It is said his reply was, 'THEY MAY GO TO HELL.,' pretty language for a Governor! Between Loco Foco's rulers & Mormon neighbours we are in a poor situation."Jacob Worrell had been captain of the Carthage militia who had guarded Joseph Smith's cell and permitted the mob to storm it. He was most likely killed by one of the most feared Mormon enforcers, Orrin Porter Rockwell. The locofocos were a group of radical Democrats prominent in the 1830s; by 1845 it was used by their opponents to refer to Democrats in general. It would not be long before the Latter-day Saints in Nauvoo were compelled to move yet again from what had seemed to be their promised land. Fine. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $8,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
557   [The Hiding Joseph Smiths Body] They took care of the bodies (of Joseph and Hyrum Smith) and filled the coffins with stone and had them buried and the world does not know any
thing about it.Ursulia B. Hascall Incredible content Autograph Lette[The Hiding Joseph Smith's Body] "They took care of the bodies (of Joseph and Hyrum Smith) and filled the coffins with stone and had them buried and the world does not know any thing about it".Ursulia B. Hascall Incredible content Autograph Letter Signed by Mormon convert Ursulia B. Hascall, 3-1/3 pages, 4to, Nauvoo, May 2, 1846. She writes to her brother, Col. Wilson Andrews, in North New Salem, Massachusetts, at first explaining the pleasures and rigors of travel up the Mississippi: "I took cabin with the millionaires, and two of the mormon sisters with me. …. The best of tea and coffee for breakfast and supper and a darky behind your chair every meal to run at your bidding." But she must complete her journey in much more modest quarters in order to make good time, and on two occasions a man is lost overboard, causing passengers to search frantically for their own loved ones. When she reaches Nauvoo, she enjoys a reunion with her daughter, Irene Hascall Pomeroy, and her new grandchild, explaining that,"We expect to start west in about two weeks. Francis (Pomeroy, her son-in-law) has gone to St. Louis to get things for us on the journey...Team after team is going over the river every day for the west .... I want to tell mother something about the prophets Joseph and Hyram. She knows he said he should not be brought back alife. He told the twelve before he went to Carthage what to do with his body and when they brought the bodies home every body saw them in the mansion house and then they took care of the bodies and filled the coffins with stone and had them buried and the world does not know any thing about it. I saw ever so many locks of Joseph hair. I wondered how they came to save so much. At last they told me he was not buried. I went to a festival in the temple. Irene carried her babe. After I saw five babies I thought I would count all that came. There was thirteen like Irenes and many more that could walk. If some die I think there is a number live. Thales (Ursulia's young son) is out of patience with the mud. He wants to be going where we can pitch our tents and have grass all around us."After the official burial of their decoy caskets, Joseph and Hyrum Smith were buried beneath the Nauvoo House, a boarding house that was still under construction (and was never completed). They were later relocated near the Mansion House, Joseph's actual home at the time of his murder. Ursulia B. Hascall (1791-1875) and her daughter Irene Hascall Pomeroy (1825-61) have through their correspondence provided important records of life in Nauvoo and during the long trek westward to Utah. Francis Hascall was chosen to be part of the Pioneer Company that blazed the westward trail from Nauvoo that would ultimately lead to the shores of the Great Salt Lake. Ursulia, Irene, Thales, and Irene's children would soon follow. Seal holes affecting two lines of third page. (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $28,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
558   [Plural Marriage after Smiths Death], Plural marriage, danger in the temple, and factionalism following Joseph Smiths death. Amazing content letter by non-Mormon, Mr. E.
Thompson of Keokuk, Iowa Territory, just a few miles south of Nauvoo acros[Plural Marriage after Smith's Death], Plural marriage, danger in the temple, and factionalism following Joseph Smith's death. Amazing content letter by non-Mormon, Mr. E. Thompson of Keokuk, Iowa Territory, just a few miles south of Nauvoo across the Mississippi River, May 26, 1846. Cover with Keokuk / I.T. postmark, and with 10-cent rate at right. Writing to a friend in Sing Sing, NY, Thompson begins by lamenting that Mormon relatives are heading west with the exodus led by Brigham Young. He explains that a daughter of that family, Mary Ann, has become one of Joseph Bates Noble's "Spiritual fixings." Noble is believed to have performed the very first plural wedding for Joseph Smith, marrying his own sister-in-law to the prophet. But Mary Ann suffered a miscarriage "and was crazy...and disturbing the whole neighbourhood...shouting to the utmost of her voice Oh! Brigham you've deceived me, you've deceived me (apostle Heber C.) Kimball...Noble's you've deceived me...(but I think such expressions quite sane)."Another with marital woes is Charles Wesley Wandell, (who would become estranged from the church under Young and is best known for helping expose its part in the Mountain Meadows Massacre). His wife is angry "in consequence of him wanting to have more wives, telling her she is keeping him from a great glory and that he will only be a dim star in the Celestial kingdom."Apostle Parley P. Pratt "is living in St. Louis altogether on the charities of the people...He is quite childish...Miss (Mary Ann) Merril & old Mother Pratt wanted to come down to Keokuk to take SB (steamboat) to St. Louis but when Prof. O Pratt returned home last fall from his eastern mission he put up at the Hotel & him & Miss M. in a private room the most of the time neglecting her work & much to the annoyance of Mr. Barnum the landlord." Pratt purchased a fancy carriage, trunks, and robes, "& paid for it out of Temple funds. The following morning he drove up to the entrance of the hotel (she having told Mrs. B that she was going to be married to a gentleman from the east) and Miss M jumps in." They headed west, "she being some 6 or 7 months advanced in pregnancy when they left."Miss Merrill would become one of Orson Pratt's wives. Thompson gives his colorful opinion of plural marriage when writing about endowment ceremonies, where the righteous received the gift of spiritual wives. The rites included theatrical re-enactments of biblical or Mormon stories. Thompson calls them a farce, adding: "that in the terrestrial kingdom...they took solem oaths & covenants that the man & woman would be true to each other, but when they got into the celestial kingdom they might have free course, run & be sealed - the keys of that kingdom was kept by (apostle) Mr. Ezra T. Benson & Mr. (John D.) Lee....acted the part of the devil. They said he did it to perfection NO DOUBT."Thompson gossips about Brigham Young being "at a ball in the winter time where Hannah Long was and asked her if she would not be married to him. She said she was willing" but her parents refused. "There was some dozen wanted her & as many wanted Eliza Parry. So the old folks told me, such a time of running in the time of the endowment scrape you can't imagine, worse than a lot of dogs after a slut." The LDS community had begun its westward exodus under Young, and "There is some six large flat boats constantly crossing the river with there Teams and Cattle...4 fifths of the Mormons have already gone...All is to leave Nauvoo...Most of the good houses have been sold to new comers." He has tried to rent to them but "the good mormons have broke a good many pickets off. I dont suppose there is over a dozen lots planted...in the whole city, for they burnt up most all of the fences."Thompson also relates a curious series of incidents surrounding the dedication of the Mormon temple in Nauvoo. It had been completed in haste, as plans to emigrate had already been made, with the consequence that when"it was dedicated to there god on the 1 2 & 3 of May - none admitted without paying a dollar each...The last time Brigham preached in the Temple...the lower pillars settled down some six inches & upper ones too...It made quite a crash. The people rushed to the windows & doors, but the first man that jumped out of the east window was B with two six shooting pistols in a belt on his side. .. At the time they was giving there so called endowments...the outer walls shook to that degree that they had to cease."With the Mormons leaving town, the temple was vandalized four months after this letter, and would be burned two years later, probably by one of Young's followers who wanted to erase any challenge to the planned temple in Utah. The LDS church had already begun to splinter into factions after Joseph Smith's death. While Young led the largest group west, his rival James Strang led a group to Wisconsin. A third faction under Sidney Rigdon had already relocated to Pittsburgh. Thompson explains, "Strang...claims to be the man that was appointed by Joseph - not ordained...Prest. Rigdon mentions about 20 times about being...ordained by Joseph. They had a conference about a month since..." Joseph's younger son William "Smith and his mother Emma & family are all from Strang. Prest. (William) Marks - J.E. Page" have all gone with Strang. Rigdonite Benjamin "Winchester wrote to Strang...if he would appoint him one of the 12 he would unite with him. Strang wrote that he neither wanted him nor his influence."Thompson may have confused a few rumors, for according to most sources, Emma Smith actually favored Marks, who himself favored Sidney Rigdon. Her family would stay in Nauvoo. James Strang's faction would ultimately settle on an island in Lake Michigan, where Strang was murdered in 1856 by disgruntled former followers; the Strangites and others would unite under Joseph Smith III, forming what would come to be called the Reorganized Church of Latter-day Saints. General fold wear, much of it archivally repaired with tape. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $32,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
559   [Violence in Nauvoo, views from both sides], choice pair of letters, one by a Mormon and one by a local Presbyterian missionary. The first letter, by G.C. Beaman in Montrose,
Iowa Territory, July 7, 1846, is to Rev. Badger of the Home Missionary[Violence in Nauvoo, views from both sides], choice pair of letters, one by a Mormon and one by a local Presbyterian missionary. The first letter, by G.C. Beaman in Montrose, Iowa Territory, July 7, 1846, is to Rev. Badger of the Home Missionary Society in New York. Beaman was urged to stop on his way to Iowa because of the changes occurring as the Mormons in Nauvoo (just across the Mississippi) prepared to move west. He calls Mormonism"only another name for black-legism, especially as it respects counterfeiting & horse-stealing & general corruption of morals. Profanity, Sabb-breaking & unlawful intercourse...(which is, in Mormon dialect, Spiritual wifery & a doctrine of their church) can't be surpassed by any set of people Christian or heathen. This things...are true of a majority I may say & in truth, of a great majority, though there area few honorable exceptions...Working on the Sabb. they say is right especially when preparing to go into the wilderness. Stealing they contend is not wrong, for they are god's people, & He has give [sic] the earth (which is his) to his people, & they have a right to it. Some 12,000 or 15,000 have left...Therre are perhaps 500 or 600 yet in Nauvoo...It is hoped that they will all go...Many of them, especially those who come from other parts of the country or other countries...deny & denounce Mormonism, when they see what it is at head-quarters." The Mormons "are falling to pieces & will soon come to nough. They contain no elements but those of destruction, they will die of themselves if let alone." He adds that "There has been considerable excitement in Hancock & some joining Cos. in Ill. & a mob of 400 or 500 had been collected, but no serious injury done & I think will not be, certainly not if they sell their Temple."A letter from Nauvoo the following October 31, written by P.T. Sanders to his sister, Ruth H. Dean in Madison, Indiana, tells of violence from the Mormon point of view. Hard times have hit:"What little we had is now nearly expended. We have nearly eaten up my two houses and lots. They were at moderate calculation worth 400 dollars, and I have sold them for 65 dollars mostly in trade...If we do not recieve help or health I do not know what will become of us. It is very uncertain whether we will be allowed to remain here...We have not means to go away, if we are run again...Gov. Ford is now in Nauvoo with 200 soldiers for the purpose of reinstating the new citizens. When he leaves I fear it will be worse times...but rest assured, Mc. and me will never risk another battle. The lead balls flew so careless round us before that we do not want to play the game any more. We never had to exceed 110 men fighting on our side, while the mob never had less than 500, and from that to 1500." He adds in a sad postscript, "We returned to Nauvoo because we could not go any where else." Attempts to sell the Nauvoo Temple met with no success until 1848, when it was sold for just $5000. Of course, Beaman's prediction about the Latter-day Saints could not have been more wrong; their community on the Great Salt Lake flourished. One possible reason for its success was that those who were unable to go due to disease or poverty were obliged to remain behind, as in the case of the Sanders family. Both letters have fold wear and splitting. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $6,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
560 c   [Camp of Israel], Camp of Israel, Winter Quarters Indian Territory April 1847 dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf carried overland and placed in the mails in
Boston as per red Boston, Mass16 Jul datestamp, about three months[Camp of Israel], "Camp of Israel, Winter Quarters Indian Territory April 1847" dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf carried overland and placed in the mails in Boston as per red "Boston, Mass/16 Jul" datestamp, about three months in transit, very fine.An excellent letter from Ursula B. Hascall relating to the departure of the Pioneer Company, and the ones that followed in which she travelled, with great detail on the hardship and suffering of the Mormons and life at Winter Quarters: "...I assure you the time has now arrived that we are preparing to pursue our journey. (We) expect to arrive at our place of rest (Salt Lake Valley) before we stop again, only for repairs &c. About two hundred pioneers started two weeks ago. …. There was ten men chosen to herd them (the cattle) and keep the Indians from killing them. Francis was one of the ten - had 2 dollars per head...There is companies organized of hundred and Captains of fifties and tens. We are going in brother Wallace's Company of fifty. The Woodburys are going with the same company. They are twenty miles from here. Thomas has been here and staid over night. Where William is they do not know. Brother Aikins family are at Garden Grove (Decatur Co. Iowa) some distance back. Samuel came on with brother Pond's family and died here away from father and mother. I suppose you have heard of the deaths in brother Ponds family. The children are all dead but Elizabeth Loenza. When they were on the way here they turned from the main road into a settlement where he and Samuel could earn two dollars per day with their teams. It proved to be an unhealthy place. They were all taken sick and they came away as soon as they could, but they were unable to take care of themselves on the road and suffered for the want of care. Lowell died before they arrived, the rest lived to get here and then dropped away one after another. Sister Pond has not recovered and I fear she never will. Brother Ponds health is very poor. Sister Clark died on the way here. She wore her self out with hard work...Yes, sooner or later the Lord will avenge the blood of his martyred Profhets and persecuted Saints, unless they repent and restore their rights. Irene read President Polks message - it is as harmless as milk and water...." Ursulia then asked about various people back home. Regarding her Mother she comments: "Tell her to enjoy herself and be prepared for a part in the first resurection and live with Christ on the earth a thousand years. Is it not worthy of our whole time and talent? ....Give my respects to Grandfather and mother Andrews. Tell them the Mormons have built one of the best grist mills that ever was run in the States. Although this is Indian Territory when they leave it the next company (of Mormons will use it and so on until all the mormons have passed along. …. I went with the wives of the elders that were sent on missions, widows and soldiers wives… I send this (letter) by a sister that is going to Boston to visit her friends. (She) returns in October. Her name is Sabra Granger. Direct your letters to Francis M. Pomeroy Huntsackers Ferry, Austin postoffice, Atchinson County, Missouri, to be forwarded to the Camp of Israel. Your affectionate U B M. I send you a piece of my new bonnet the handsomest one you have seen."When the Mormons began their exodus from Nauvoo in February of 1846 they established camps across Iowa, such as Mount Pisgah, Garden Grove and Winter Quarters on the west side of the Missouri River, near present day Florence, Nebraska. It was from Winter Quarters that Brigham Young led the Pioneer Company of 143 men and three women in 70 horse drawn wagons in April of 1847. (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $10,000.00
Will close during Public Auction

Previous Page, Next Page or Return to Table of Contents


StampAuctionCentral and StampAuctionNetwork are
Copyright © 1994-2016 Droege Computing Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Back to Top of Page