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WESTERN EXPANSION continued...

CALIFORNIA continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
461 c   Forwarded by Thomas O. Larkin Monterey, California, bold oval backstamp on folded letter with integral address leaf datelined Monterey March 7, 1846 to Boston, Mass., endorsed
pr Brig Hannah and carried to Mazatlan, Mexico, then overland to VForwarded by Thomas O. Larkin Monterey, California, bold oval backstamp on folded letter with integral address leaf datelined "Monterey March 7, 1846" to Boston, Mass., endorsed "pr Brig Hannah" and carried to Mazatlan, Mexico, then overland to Vera Cruz where it was given to a ship bound for New Orleans, entered the mails with "New Orleans/May 6" datestamp, matching "SHIP" handstamp and manuscript "12" rate, very fine.Captain Elliott Libbey writes to the owners of the ship back in Boston: "Mr. Mellus (Henry) writes all the particulars concerning business &. On the last passage up from the leeward coast to this place I discovered the ship Bonsprit to be very rotten and split badly and I shall be under the necessity of getting a new one and putting it in in St. Francisco....We are all expecting the Barnstable. Mr. Mellus will remain here until she arrives while I proceed to St. Francisco....I am in hopes to be able to leave the coast next winter with a cargo of 30,000 hides at least...." (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $2,200.00
Will close during Public Auction
462   [Cattle Brands, Yerba Buena, 1846] Choice early autograph document signed by E. Ward Pell, inspector general of hides and tallow, Yerba Buena, September 21, 1846, with his
inspection of the same for William H. Davis, the pioneer who authored Si[Cattle Brands, Yerba Buena, 1846] Choice early autograph document signed by E. Ward Pell, inspector general of hides and tallow, Yerba Buena, September 21, 1846, with his inspection of the same for William H. Davis, the pioneer who authored Sixty Years in California. Pell lists various brands found on Davis' hides and tallow, one of the latter of which apparently belongs to a Mr. Leidensdorff. Yerba Buena, first settled in 1822, would become the nucleus of the great city of San Francisco. The site had only been claimed by the United States two months earlier. At the time of this document, San Francisco had only 1000 residents; that would increase by 2500% in three years once gold was discovered. This may be the earliest document of its kind under the aegis of the United States. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $3,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
463 c   U.S. Ship Columbus Harbor of Monterey, Upper California March, 1847, dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf to Canterbury, N.Y., entered the mails with red
New-YorkShip7 ctsJuly 21 datestamp, cover stained and with repaired intU.S. Ship Columbus Harbor of Monterey, Upper California March, 1847, dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf to Canterbury, N.Y., entered the mails with red "New-York/Ship/7 cts/July 21" datestamp, cover stained and with repaired internal splits, very fine content.Charles Hand reports on the arrival of U.S. Ships of war at Monterey - that the American flag is now the national banner of California - Kearny has defeated the Mexicans at San Pascual on December 6, 1846 and the Californios are selling beef as low as one cent per pound:"Father & Mother You will percieve by the above that we are at the seat of War in this ocean, where we arrived on the 2nd inst after a passage of 52 days from Callao [Peru]...We found on our arrival here the Frigates Independence, and Savannah with the Store Ship Lexington and the Sloop of War Warren arrived about four hours afterwards. - So that at this time March 5th there are 5 Men of War in the Harbor. There are some American troops on the coast and at San Diego 90 miles - northward of us are some 7 or 800 Mormons who count 400 effective men. Colonel Kearney of the 1st U.S. Dragoons is also here having crossed the country and from Santa Fe to this place he had but 100 men. When at Pueblo about 200 miles in the interior he was surrounded by a force of 7 or 800 Mexicans through whom he cut his way and arrived here with the loss of but 18 men. (Battle of San Pascual. After a severe hand-to-hand action the Mexicans left and Kearney called it an American victory although it was a costly one.) The American Flag is now the National Banner of California and if the Government ever gives it up to Mexican misrule, the President who signs the Treaty and the Senators who vote for its ratification should be held in the same estimation, that the memory of the traitor Arnold is - From what we can see from the ship Monterey has not increased much in size since 1840, when I was here in a whaler, but as I thought then I think now it is one of the most beautiful countries in the World.. General Aristas (Mariano) wife is here, and in fact I believe almost the only warrior in the place .. she is reported to have said that her husband need never return unless he can bring a neclace of scalps of the miserable Americanos as some of our enemies style us - When Commodore Stockton first established a form of Government here and took possession of the country a majority of the male inhabitants fled to the interior but the most of them have since returned, and are now living peaceably in the Town. We are now waiting the arrival of the frigate Congress and the Sloops Portsmouth and Cyanne when we are to proceed southward to the reduction of Mazatlan and Accapulco, which latter is represented to be second only to Vera Cruz in its defences. We are at present the Flag Ship of the Squadron and as Commodore Biddle is the oldest Commodore afloat he is Commander in Chief of the United States forces in the Pacific....Troop ships are now on the way to this place, but if any men except Mechanics are to be left I shall Volunteer, if not I shall return here within a year after reaching the United States....I am still employed a School Teacher on board this ship.... Chas L. Hand". (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $8,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
464 c   [Kearnys 1847 California Mail Route] folded letter with integral address leaf addressed to W.D.M. Howard at (Los) Angeles with magenta manuscript San FranciscoDec 27 military
postmark the first American mail route in California, the only r[Kearny's 1847 California Mail Route] folded letter with integral address leaf addressed to W.D.M. Howard at (Los) "Angeles" with magenta manuscript "San Francisco/Dec 27" military postmark; the first American mail route in California, the only reported example, very fine. The military express ran every Monday from either end of the route. December 27, 1847 was the fourth Monday, the day the express would leave San Francisco with this letter for Los Angeles. This was the first mail route within California established by the military government. Joseph L. Folsom acted as the military postmaster. The writer of the letter, Henry Mellus came to California in 1835 as a sailor before the mast, with Richard H. Dana in the Pilgrim. For a time he was the agent for Appleton & Co. in the hide & tallow trade. Later a partner with W.D.M. Howard buying the Hudson Bay Co.'s property in 1846. (Image) Est. $7,500-10,000

SOLD for $20,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
465   Marshall, James W. His Signature Jas. W. Marshall on a 2.8 x 5.3 imprinted souvenir card. As the card indicates, Marshall is known as The Discoverer of Gold in California
January 19th, 1848. Marshall had been working for John Sutter to buMarshall, James W. His Signature "Jas. W. Marshall" on a 2.8" x 5.3" imprinted souvenir card. As the card indicates, Marshall is known as "The Discoverer of Gold in California / January 19th, 1848". Marshall had been working for John Sutter to build and improve a sawmill in Coloma, CA. There he accidentally discovered gold while widening the water channel that ran the mill. There is some disagreement about the exact date; many sources say January 24, while Sutter said it happened in the first half of the month. We have seen this autograph, in the same form and condition, offered at nearly ten times our estimate. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
466 c   Monterey, Cal. Oct. 23rd, 1848 dateline of folded letter with integral address leaf to General N. Towson, Paymaster General U.S.A., Washington, D.C., carried by ship to
Mazatlan or Acapulco, Mexico, and overland to Vera Cruz where it entered theMonterey, Cal. Oct. 23rd, 1848 dateline of folded letter with integral address leaf to General N. Towson, Paymaster General U.S.A., Washington, D.C., carried by ship to Mazatlan or Acapulco, Mexico, and overland to Vera Cruz where it entered the Mexican mails with their backstamp, arrived in the U.S. with manuscript "f" (free) rate, "New Orleans, La/Jan 12" datestamp and matching "SHIP" handstamp, slightly toned file folds, very fine.A great letter from William Rich, an Army Paymaster, during the excitement of the Gold Rush and its effects on the military situation in California: "I arrived on the 18th inst. from San Diego; and have paid the four companies of the 1st New York Regiment in full, [Col. J.D. Stevenson commander], and they have all started for the gold mines....the command of Lt. Col. Burton are now here and will muster out today....as the residents are extremely anxious to get rid of them....Nearly all the men of Co. "F" 3d Artillery, have deserted. We have the Ohio, Warren, Dale, Lexington and Southampton [U.S. War Ships] in port, but they cannot land a man, as they desert as soon as they set foot on shore, the only thing the Ships could do in case of an outbreak would be to fire upon the town....Treasury Notes are good for nothing now....Gold dust can be purchased for eight or ten dollars the ounce and it is said to be worth $18.00 in the U. States....Col. Mason and most of the Army officers are at Fort Sutter....THE GOLD FEVER RAGES AS BAD AS EVER and the quantity collected has not diminished but increases...” (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $3,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
467 c   [The Hounds and Gold Rush Justice in 1849] San Francisco, Cal.Sep  territorial period datestamp and manuscript 40 rate on folded letter with integral address leaf to New York
that was datelined at Stockton Augt 21st 1849 - on the San Joa[The "Hounds" and Gold Rush Justice in 1849] "San Francisco, Cal./Sep " territorial period datestamp and manuscript "40" rate on folded letter with integral address leaf to New York that was datelined at "Stockton Aug't 21st 1849 - on the San Joaquin", very fine.Interesting letter talking about the throngs of gold seekers arriving daily and: "...About a fortnight before we arrived there was a society of rascals here who had great power called the Hounds - The citizens of this place have confined and tried before an alcalde (Mayor) and twelve jurymen the two leaders and the head Captain (Sam Roberts) of all was hung last Monday - all the citizens arming them to prevent any disturbance. I attended part & left when the white cap was put over his head and the rope adjusted - all passed off very quietly and every thing is now as peaceable and even more so than at home. The Mexicans who are notorious for stealing are deterred by the summary manner in which justice is done and goods of all descriptions are lying out of doors in any quantity without a particle of loss. While we hear nothing in the shape of crime being committed any where in California since the suppression of the "hounds". I forgot to say they were principally Mexicans."The "Hounds" mentioned in the letter was an organization of the disbanded New York Volunteers regiment, which had come out in 1847. Their claim for being was "self protection", but it was more like "unorganized lawlessness". They conducted a campaign of violence & robbery, mostly against the Latins from South America. On July 15, 1849 they attacked the district called "Little Chile”. The next day the citizens organized into companies and arrested 20 of the Hounds. That same afternoon a "peoples court", with the alcalde [mayor] acting as judge, convicted 9 of the accused, including the leader Sam Roberts. However because of the disturbed conditions at the time, the sentences were never carried out. The records do not show that the leader was hung as related in the letter. It may be that the leader came very close to being executed and was released at the last moment - after the writer had left the scene as he states in the letter. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $2,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
468 c   Vernon Cal. Sept 22, 1849, manuscript postmark and 40 rate on folded letter with integral address leaf to Farmington, Maine, extremely fine.Moses B. Reed, a Forty-Niner, writes
to his nephew giving a detailed report of his overland journey fromVernon Cal. Sept 22, 1849, manuscript postmark and "40" rate on folded letter with integral address leaf to Farmington, Maine, extremely fine.Moses B. Reed, a Forty-Niner, writes to his nephew giving a detailed report of his overland journey from St. Joseph to California in the remarkable time of 131 days. He describes the geographical landmarks along the trail and the hardships and tragedies experienced by many of the emigrants. A full transcript of this long letter is included.Vernon, California was located at the confluence of the Feather and Sacramento Rivers in Sutter County. It was a short lived mushroom town during the Gold Rush period. The Post Office Was established in the Fall of 1849 and discontinued in November of 1853 and the town gradually died out. (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $2,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
469 c   [On the Mexican Gold Trail to California] Oct 3rd 1849, I write from a Ranch 30 miles East of Pueblo los Angeles the first line of a Crittenden correspondence folded letter
with integral address leaf to Brazoria, Texas, entered the mails with <[On the Mexican Gold Trail to California] "Oct 3rd 1849, I write from a Ranch 30 miles East of Pueblo los Angeles" the first line of a Crittenden correspondence folded letter with integral address leaf to Brazoria, Texas, entered the mails with manuscript "San Diego, Cal/Nov. 3rd, 1849" pre-statehood period postmark and "40" rate, endorsed "Via New Orleans" but with no additional postmarks, very fine; one of the earliest San Diego postmarks. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $750.00
Will close during Public Auction
470 c   [Stockton California 40 cent rate uses] four covers, one with manuscript Stockton Cal.Dec 28, 1849 territorial period postmark and matching 40 rate on folded letter with
integral address leaf to Jacksonville, Illinois, second with blue Stoc[Stockton California 40 cent rate uses] four covers, one with manuscript "Stockton Cal./Dec 28, 1849" territorial period postmark and matching "40" rate on folded letter with integral address leaf to Jacksonville, Illinois, second with blue "Stockton, Cal./Jan 13" datestamp struck twice and matching "Paid" and "40" handstamp on buff cover to Iowa, third with blue "Stockton, Cal/Jan 30" datestamp and matching large "40" in oval handstamp on folded letter with integral address leaf to Boston, and last an incoming letter to Stockton with blue "Battle Creek, Mich./30 May (1851) datestamp and matching "40" rate that was forwarded on arrival to Mokelomne with Stockton's blue oval "Forwarded" handstamp and "5" forwarding charge in pencil for a total of 45c due, fine-very fine group.Last with letter in which the sender writes: "..I see on your last letter you had written "paid" but was not stamped "Paid" by the P.M. consequently I had to pay 40 ct - now it is very convenient to have the postage pd particularly when change (money) is as scarce as it is with me at present but it is not worth a while for you to pay it there & still have it unpaid - there is quite a party left this town this spring for California..." (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $1,150.00
Will close during Public Auction
471 c   Sacramento River Steamer Senator Dec. 21, 1849 25 miles from San Francisco 2 O.C. P.M. dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf to Waterbury, Ct., entered the mails
with San Francisco, Cal.Dec 31 datestamp and matching boxed 40 rSacramento River Steamer Senator Dec. 21, 1849 25 miles from San Francisco 2 O.C. P.M. dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf to Waterbury, Ct., entered the mails with "San Francisco, Cal./Dec 31" datestamp and matching boxed "40" rate handstamp, very fine.The following is taken from the letter written onboard the Senator by Merit Welton. He writes regarding mail from home and sending Gold: "The last remittence was Sixty two & a half ounces worth $1000 here & I am in hopes 1200 or 1300 there - I paid $70 freight & Ins[urance]. I shall write every opportunity & send money when I can send safe....I have travelled from Sutters Mill to Sacramento City which stands on the Sac. River 100 miles above S. Francisco....The roads are almost impassable....It rains almost every day & 20 miles feuther North it snowes as the Mts are all white & and do not look over 10 miles from the Mill....San Francisco Dec 28th 1849 2 O.C.P.M.- I went to the [Post] Office as soon as arose this morning & being there an hour before it opened I was the 4th man & obtained 6 letters....I cannot get letters without Ceruesy [Currency] here & then spending half a day at the P.O.....The people up in the revines would gladly pay 1 Oz of Gold a letter if they could have them on the arrival of the mail here or in one week afterwards but they cannot & it is all luck & chance about getting any letters here, even by applying at the P.O. & waiting your turn. The mud here is very bad - you cannot possibly go out without being in the mud (which is excellent clay Morter) about 4 or 5 inches - by picking round & going between Houses & back side & in the middle of the street it is up to a Horses belly. There has been a fire here which has burned up one Block of some Millions of Dolls but the speed with which they are putting it [back] again [is like] N. York for dexterity....Merit Welton"The Senator was one of the best known steamboats to operate on the Sacramento River during the Gold Rush period. It was a sidewheeler of 740 tons, with auxiliary sail, built at New York in 1848. On 10 March, 1849 she left for San Francisco via cape Horn, arriving in that port on 27 October. She was immediately put into service on the San Francisco - Sacramento River run. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,600.00
Will close during Public Auction
472   [California Trail Letters] Pair of autograph letters from Ft. Laramie, 1850, from emigrants following the glow of gold. In the first, Norman Bishop tells his wife back in Cedar
Rapids, IA:We are now 533 miles from the Bluffs and about 782 from[California Trail Letters] Pair of autograph letters from Ft. Laramie, 1850, from emigrants following the glow of gold. In the first, Norman Bishop tells his wife back in Cedar Rapids, IA:"We are now 533 miles from the Bluffs and about 782 from home and about one third of the distance on our way to the mines...Horses & provisions are to be had herre but the price is above my pile." He has left his old company (who owe him $50) and taken up with others, from Dubuque, who have shared with him. "We have had all the buffalo meet that we could use for the last two or three weeks. We have dryed some 40 or 50 lbs...we have passed several companies who have the small pox...If we can get ready to leave tomorrow we can keep a head of that disease."The second letter, from Lorenzo D. Custer on June 28, is to his own wife: "Ft. Larrimie is pleasantly situated on the south side of the Platt...The ft. is built of Sun Burnt Brick and garrisoned by 160 soldiers. Some very good houses are being built...Sick Emmigrants are taken into the Hospital & cared for until they are well...or dead and burried (free of charge)...There has passed this place up to the 23 June 34,753 men, 583 women, 753 children, 8,168 wagons, 21,435 horses, 7,206 mules, 24,796 Oxen, 3,855 cows. There has been 2 deaths on the north side of the river - the route that I traveled and 155 on the south, mostly with Diarea or Colera. The government takes our letters ot the States free of charge. I feel as sanguine of success as ever and expect to be in the diggins in 50 days. I have lost of Provisions...My teams are in good condition & my cows give plenty of milk."The journal at the fort of which Custer speaks has never been found, so this record of it is of great historical interest. One intriguing matter is the large number of horses that are being taken in contrast to the number of oxen and especially mules. Earlier trains had used far more oxen and mules. The change shows that more men were going on their own, so that large teams drawing heavy family wagons were less common. Custer is only partly right about the mails. The present letter was carried to Independence, MO free, but from there was sent with a charge due of 10 cents. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $900.00
Will close during Public Auction
473   [Gold District] hand-drawn and colored period map of the California Gold District with Gold first discovered location noted, 3 by 4¾, drawn by fourty-niner A.T. Mitchel, small
hole, fine.[Gold District] hand-drawn and colored period map of the California Gold District with "Gold first discovered" location noted, 3" by 4¾", drawn by fourty-niner A.T. Mitchel, small hole, fine. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
474   [San Francisco, Vigilance Committee] The Miller Correspondence 1849-60 a large group of 59 letters, documents, and items of ephemera regarding Nathaniel Miller, a storekeeper
in San Francisco and a member of its 1851 Vigilance Committee. Writing[San Francisco, Vigilance Committee] The Miller Correspondence 1849-60; a large group of 59 letters, documents, and items of ephemera regarding Nathaniel Miller, a storekeeper in San Francisco and a member of its 1851 Vigilance Committee. Writing to his friend (and probably his future wife) Ellen back on Long Island, NY, in 1849, he explains that "thousands pouring in from all parts of the world. Many are disappointed finding that they have got to work hard to get the glittering dust but there is plenty of it in the country and hard knocks will fetch it." He is being shrewd in his business but "a majority speculate wild and reckless here and property is far above real value."Gambling is rampant and crime common, though "a person can just as well keep clear of them if he is a mind to. There is generally good order kept here, there being a majority in favor of it and crime is soon punish'd. Five men are to be hung tomorrow." He agrees quite ominously with a colleague who says "others must toe the mark and walk straight or his legs will not be long enough some day to reach the ground." Hearing that two of his brothers are planning to head for California, he warns in April 1850 that they should stay home, for if they can't work hard enough to succeed back east, they can't do so in California, either. The mines are being emptied too quickly as it is. Miller's father had been a doctor, and so he did not scruple to "charge a man five dollars to day for looking at his tongue and giving him a little medicine" since regular doctors would have charged $16. He boasts that he can "knock dysentery into fits and am sound on fevers."He shows definite enterprise, investing in the schooner Sierra Nevada (document present), bound for the China trade. However, business does not pick up, and he reports in January 1851 that "high prices heretofore realized has stimulated shipments from all parts of the world to this place and heavy losses will be the result," though he still hopes to keep his store going. "Sometimes we live like princes on Elk & venison; then again it is only stag. I am about tired of it, still it is about as well as we can do."These end his own letters to Ellen, but the archive is much larger, for in addition there are 43 ALS written to Miller, the large majority from San Francisco and San Jose, 1853-57, (though the latest of all is 1887), the first few years after Miller returned to New York. The most notable of these friends is Richard Jessup, who would be on the executive committee of the 1856 San Francisco Committee of Vigilance. An entertaining and informative writer, he leases Miller in 1853 that a property he owned on Telegraph Hill would now sell for "not less than $4500. That is your luck." In February 1855, a business-minded friend, R.B. Fordham, writes about a run on Page, Bacon & Co., San Franciscoís largest bank, but in May reports that "had your letter been written one day later your confidence in the house of P.B. & Co. would have undergone a change. You will have heard ere this of the second failure of that house." A year later, the bank is in dire trouble and Fordham replies to Miller's "wish to have your affairs with P.B. & Co. closed. We would also like to see a prospect ahead for doing so." Fordham adds that "Your friend Jessup is a strong man in the V(igilance) Committee, as is also numerous others, who served with you in the old organization of Fifty-one. … this committee will only bring about a revolution in honesty, we will then stand a better chance for getting paid for our labors." A letter from February 19 of that year reports an earthquake a few days earlier. One wonderful item is an Original Drawing of Miller's store in San Francisco, on the top half of a 4to sheet. Possibly intended as a vignette to be printed as his store's letterhead. With numerous Documents, including an 1850 deed for three lots in San Francisco; real estate auction receipts; bills of exchange, tax assessments, account sheets, and more. Also with six invitations to reunions by the Associated Pioneers of the Territorial Days of California, 1880-91, one for a special meeting upon the death of one of its most famous members, General W.T. Sherman. With several clippings on Miller and his family. Also ten Photographs, four of them modern reprints, of Miller and his wife Ellen in their later years. These letters have far more content than we can record here, and will generously reward investigation. (imagea) (Image) Est. $3,000-4,000

SOLD for $10,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
475 c   [On the Mexican Gold Trail to California] folded Chrittenden correspondence letter with integral address leave to Brazoria, Texas written on the trail while en route to the
gold fields in 1849, letter begun at Pueblo los Angeles on October 12 and[On the Mexican Gold Trail to California] folded Chrittenden correspondence letter with integral address leave to Brazoria, Texas written on the trail while en route to the gold fields in 1849, letter begun at Pueblo los Angeles on October 12 and finished at San Francisco on November 15, 1849, being a very long descriptive letter of the entire journey of about 2,600 miles, entered the mails with "San Francisco, Cal./Nov 15" datestamp and matching boxed '40" rate, very fine; letters and diaries from the Mexican route to the gold fields of California are very scarce. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,400.00
Will close during Public Auction
476 c   [On the Mexican Gold Trail to California] six Crittenden correspondence folded letters with integral address leaves to Brasoria, Texas written on the trail while en route to the gold fields in 1849 comprised of manuscript "San Felipe Tex/Apr 12th, 1849" manuscript postmark, letter datelined "Near Fredricksburg/May 2nd, 1849" that entered the mails with brown "San Antonio, Txs/May 19" datestamp and matching "V" rate, next with "Austin, Texas/April 25" datestamp and manuscript "5" rate, then letter datelined "Presidio del Norte/June 8th 1849" that entered the mails with blue "Brownsville, Txs./Jan 14" (1850) datestamp and matching "10" rate, another letter datelined at "Presidio del Norte/June 9th, 1849" that entered the mails with blue-green "San Antonio, Txs./Nov 26" datestamp and matching "5" rate, and letter dated "July 6th, 1849" with no location, but stating "Look in the seal, I send you a specimen of the Chihuahua currency" (cover with piece of front missing from seal removal), entered the mails with bold red "New Orleans, La./Aug 19" datestamp, matching "SHIP" and large "12" rate handstamps, each with lengthy descriptive letter, fine-very fine. Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $5,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
477 c   [On the Mexican Gold Trail to California] Chrittenden correspondence folded letter with integral address leaf datelined at Chihuahua, July 17th 1849 where it entered the
Mexican mails and endorsed Via New Orleans, arrived in Vera Cruz with th[On the Mexican Gold Trail to California] Chrittenden correspondence folded letter with integral address leaf datelined at "Chihuahua, July 17th 1849" where it entered the Mexican mails and endorsed "Via New Orleans," arrived in Vera Cruz with their backstamp and handed over to the British receiving their "Vera-Cruz/Au 16, 1849" backstamp, crowned circle "Paid at Vera-Cruz" postmark and manuscript "1/-" rate and carried by Royal Mail Steamship Packet Trent to Mobile where it entered the U.S. mails with red "Mobile, Ala./Aug 21" datestamp, matching "SHIP" in circle and "10" rate handstamps, Crittenden correspondence cover addressed to Brazoria, Texas, fresh and extremely fine; illustrated in Letters of Gold by Jesse L. Coburn on page 12. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,450.00
Will close during Public Auction
478 c   [On the Oregon Trail a Forty-niners correspondence], six folded letters with integral address leaves written by Schuyler Holly to his wife Lydia back in Schodack, N.Y. while en
route, the first two written from the vicinity of Saint Joseph, Miss[On the Oregon Trail a Forty-niner's correspondence], six folded letters with integral address leaves written by Schuyler Holly to his wife Lydia back in Schodack, N.Y. while en route, the first two written from the vicinity of Saint Joseph, Missouri, his starting point, the others from Fort Kearney, Fort Laramie, Deer Creek, and the last from California in which her reviews his overland journey, the first two with St. Joseph datestamps, third written in the vicinity of Fort Kearney June 5th and carried by a private party entering the mails with manuscript "Kingston/June 22nd" postmark, fourth written at Fort Laramie June 24th and carried privately to the Missouri river, entering the mails with a red "STEAM 10" of Saint Louis, fifth written July 4th at Deer Creek and carried privately down the trail to enter the mails with manuscript "Linden, Mo./Aug 16" postmark and last upon arrival with oval "Sacramento, Cal./Dec 25" datestamp and matching "40" rate, last with some age spots and edge tears, fine-very fine.Holly gives a vivid description of the problems and hardships of the long journey to the far west: May 17th "...thare was a boat came up the missouri river from St. Louis with 47 deaths - it was the calary (cholera)..." May 26th "...thare is a grate many turning back...I am among the savages..." June 22nd "...Sofar we have three yoke of oxen and one yoke of cows to the wagon - we have knot lost eny yet but thare is a greate meny lying along the road Dead Cattle. We have past About Fifty Graves from St Jo to this place - we are on the plains about forty miles from fort Carney...the indians stole cattle from a company and they kil five of the Indians...I am bound for the gold reagon..." June 24th "...one man shot another by brushing the flyes off his horse with his gun - we see from too to six graves a day on the average...we see whare people have left their wagons and some have burned them...the wolves howling around every knight so that a person cannot sleep - The muscetoes are very large and thick..." then after arriving in the Sacramento Valley on Oct. 30th "...thare has been a great deal of suffering in the mountains this winter - it was a sight to see men and wimen and children Trudg along and packing what they could with them through the snow from 2 feet to 4 feet...Mcculey and I lost our cows - thare was but three whole teams in our train that came through...Thare is not much doing in the mines know...we was one month to late..." (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $5,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
479   [Forty-niners] Excellent pair of autograph letters from along the overland route to California in 1849. George Mower writes his brother from the Platte River in the Indian
Territory,We left the bluffs 5 miles this side of St. Joseph (MO) on Tu[Forty-niners] Excellent pair of autograph letters from along the overland route to California in 1849. George Mower writes his brother from the Platte River in the Indian Territory,"We left the bluffs 5 miles this side of St. Joseph (MO) on Tuesday 8th of May...with 50 others called the California Mutuall Protection company. We traveled that week some 80 miles on the Nimahaw river...The second week we traveled about 140 miles and encamped on the Banks of the little Blue River - then on Monday morning over half of our company left us because they thought they could travel faster. Nearly all the large companies that started together have split up...Wee are now encamped on the north Branch of the Platt...about 450 miles from St. Joseph...If wee have luck wee will reach our destination in about 4 months.....The only danger of Indians is of persons leave the trale a hunting and of steeling our animals nights. I have heard of several men that has been lost by leaving the road. Wee are now in the Sioux country - it is also a great Bufflow country...Some of our men suceded in killing yesterday and wee have had some fine stake since...We some times find a scarecity of wood but then wee use buffalow chips." Two hundred miles ahead of Mower, "Charlie" writes home from Ft. Laramie on June 9: "I have now learned from experince the truth and falseity of the various storeis in reference to a life on the wild planis, a nomidac life, where man subsists without wood and on water unpure and often offencive, where an intermmable waste streches out before the eye on which the Wolf the Antelope the Buffalo and other wils animals are the only living tenants .. " Along the Platte River "we struck the Black Hills, and for a considerable distance there is scarce any feed but our Oxen are in good order ...Tis really alarming to see the state of things which exist now on the route to the gold region...There are about 700 teams ahead of us and tis thought...there are 4000 teams behind us...Many of them have already lost their oxen their mules their wagons and have been forced to throw their provisions overboard ... All along may be seen piles of bacon, meal, flour beans trunks boxes...which have been disposed of thus to relieve the persons...We must lighten or fail..." Second letter has been silked. With much more interesting content than we can quote here. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $3,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
480 c   [California Argonaut Correspondence] Four letters written by a forty-niner while en route from Burlington, Vermont to Marysville, California via Cape Horn, first dated Oct 14
1849, On board Ship Harriet Rockwell, Lat 20 47 North, Long 26 42 We[California Argonaut Correspondence] Four letters written by a "forty-niner" while en route from Burlington, Vermont to Marysville, California via Cape Horn, first dated "Oct 14 1849, On board Ship Harriet Rockwell, Lat 20 47 North, Long 26 42 West" with cover home with red "New-York/Ship 7/Jan 10" datestamp, second datelined on board the same ship "Tuesday Nov 13 1849, Lat 19 39 South, Long 38 34 West" with cover home with red "Provincetown, Ms./Mar 28" datestamp and manuscript "Ship 12", third still at sea on "Feb 3rd 1850, Lat 58 50 North, Long 105 33 West" with cover home with faint red "San Francisco, Cal." territorial period datestamp with integral "40" rate, and the last sent after his arrival at the mines and datelined "Long Bar, Yuba River, California, Apr 13th, 51" with cover home with "Marysville, Cal./Apr 29" datestamp with integral "40" rate, the long letters from George Harrington make for a fascinating read, last with repaired tear at right well away from postmark, otherwise fine-very fine. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,350.00
Will close during Public Auction

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