• Login Password

    Please Login. You are NOT Logged in.

Login to Use StampAuctionNetwork.
New Member? Click "Register".

StampAuctionNetwork Channels

Help:



 
You are not logged in. Please Login so that we can determine your registration status with this firm. If you have never registered, please register and check the box for this auction firm if you want to bid with them. Then Login. Listen to Live Audio!
 
logo

EXPLORATION AND WAR continued...

THE SANTA FE TRAIL continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
381 c   [On the Santa Fe Trail] folded letter with integral address leaf datelined at Cimmeron Creek upper Spring 250 miles from Santa Fee September 17th 1846 (present day New Mexico)
and carried eastbound by private courier or military express up the[On the Santa Fe Trail] folded letter with integral address leaf datelined at "Cimmeron Creek upper Spring 250 miles from Santa Fee September 17th 1846" (present day New Mexico) and carried eastbound by private courier or military express up the Santa Fe Trail through unorganized territory beyond the western boundary of the United States, entered the mails to St. Genevieve, Missouri with "Independence, Mo/Oct 19" datestamp and manuscript "10" rate, cover stained, fine content.Enroute to Santa Fe with Doniphan's army a soldier writes: "...we saw great herds of Buffalo the first day, the men killed 40 or 50 of them, we have been eating the meat since we left Walnut Creek..." He then goes on the describe the hunt in detail. Later in the letter he writes that: "...traders I met today told me Genl. Kearny took Santa Fe without opposition, some six or seven thousand Mexicans and Indians came out a few miles to meet and give him a fight, but at the sight of our men they fled and they have not seen a Mexican soldier since. When Kearny arrived in Santa Fe, he planted the stars and stripes in the center of their public square and the Population gave our flag three cheers."In 1846, General Kearny commanded the Army of the West with instructions to conquer New Mexico and California. Colonel Doniphan, with an army of 1,000 Missouri volunteers was to join Kearny at Santa Fe. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $3,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
382   [Doniphans Expedition] Autograph note by John T. Hughes, who writes: John Browning, of the Howard company (i.e., Howard County, MO Hughess regiment was the 1st Missouri Mounted
Volunteers) was taken ill while upon the Navajo Expedition, was[Doniphan's Expedition] Autograph note by John T. Hughes, who writes: "John Browning, of the Howard company (i.e., Howard County, MO; Hughes's regiment was the 1st Missouri Mounted Volunteers) was taken ill while upon the Navajo Expedition, was brought into Socorra upon the Del...was finally removed to Albuquerque for medical aid & there died some time in December (1846). Today (Tuseday 26th) Jordan Hackley of the Howard Company, a young & interesting man, died of Typhoid Fever...His corpse will be intered tomorrow. I have reported the names of all the men who have died in the regiment because friends & relatives are anxious to hear every particular." Doniphan's men traveled from Ft. Leavenworth down the Santa Fe Trail to invade Mexican territory during the Mexican-American War. With Hughes's historic Book: Doniphan's Expedition; Containing an Account of the Conquest of New Mexico. Cincinnati, JA & UP James, 1848. 8vo, black cloth with brown cloth coverings for spine and cover illustration. Doniphan and Price portraits at front, with fold-out map. Front hinges reinforced. Risvold label on pastedown, ex-library handstamp on title. Exterior wear, some of spine label removed, map with some splits. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
383 c   Arkansas River one days march from Pawnee Forks, June 27th 1847, dateline (present day Kansas) on four page folded letter with integral address leaf, picked up on the trail and
carried by military express as per the closing line of the letter:Arkansas River one days march from Pawnee Forks, June 27th 1847, dateline (present day Kansas) on four page folded letter with integral address leaf, picked up "on the trail" and carried by military express as per the closing line of the letter: "An express starts at dusk for Fort Leavenworth by which I send this letter.", entered the mails to New York with clear "Fort Leavenworth, Mo./Jul 6" datestamp and manuscript "10" rate, about a ten day trip on the trail, very fine. Superb letter mentions, in small part:"...until we reached Pawnee Forks where we arrived just one day to late to have had an encounter with a party of Comanches & Pawnees, who attacked a homeward bound train of waggons…At Revielle or light the next morning we discovered that the Indians had made a charge on Haydens train…about Twenty one men (only) started off in pursuit of the Indians…The Indians in front seeing this, turned around and there was our poor fellows with enemies in front & rear and ten to one at least …There was at least two hundred warriors all mounted with Lances bows & arrows & a few guns…we found five men missing & party of us mounted and went over the field of battle and the first one we found was the dead body of a fine young man of my mess named Arlidge - He was stripped of his clothing, but his scalp was not taken - Then on looking around we found the dead bodies of three more men…Short beside being lanced in a dozen places had his throat cut from ear to ear - Dickhart had his ears cut off and mouth mutilated. All of these three had their scalps taken…The fifth man - Gaskin - we did not find until this morning - he was dreadfully mutilated, his scalp was not taken, but about half his hair was pulled out, I suppose the one that killed him had no knife about him...P S An Express starts at dusk for Fort Leavenworth by which send you this letter. I hope it may get through safe. M.I. Baker". (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
384 c   Camp near old camp Calhoun New Mexico, September 16th, 1847 dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf carried eastbound by military courier through unorganized
territory beyond the boundary of the United States up the Santa Fe Trail, eCamp near old camp Calhoun New Mexico, September 16th, 1847 dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf carried eastbound by military courier through unorganized territory beyond the boundary of the United States up the Santa Fe Trail, entered the mails to St. Genevieve, Missouri with "Independence, Mo/Nov 4" datestamp and manuscript "10" rate, some age toning, fine.The author of the letter, a soldier in General Kearny's Army of the West writes: "...We are on our way again to the Navajos, I have visited our old camp and the graveyard of the (Missouri) Volunteers...The men are all in fine spirits with the expectation of making themselves rich by the stock we will take from the Indians." (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $425.00
Will close during Public Auction
385 c   Head Quarters Santa Fe N.M., October 15th, 1847 dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf and carried up the Santa Fe Trail by military express, entered the mails to
Troy, Illinois at St. Louis with their red STEAM 10 handstamp, someHead Quarters Santa Fe N.M., October 15th, 1847 dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf and carried up the Santa Fe Trail by military express, entered the mails to Troy, Illinois at St. Louis with their red "STEAM 10" handstamp, some light staining, fine.In the letter Thomas McDowell vividly describes the places he visits in New Mexico. After his long march down from Fort Leavenworth: "…arrived here the 19 day of September & after a long march of 66 days through a desert inhabited (by) those hostile bands of scavages who frequent this Road for the purpose of plundering & murdering those who are so unfortunate as to fall in there cruel hands…We were somewhat amused when we came in sight of Las Vages which is the first Town in New Mexico at least on Route to Santa Fe - There houses are built of mud 7 1/2 feet high - Roofs perfectly flat covered with the same materials…A great trade is carried on between that place & Santa Fe…will now inform you that we have marching orders to El Paso which is 320 miles from here South - we will leave for here in a Short time…I will now inform you that Santa Fe is considerable of a place - the Town is about 8 miles in circumferance - houses built of mud - The main Plaza is in the center of the city about 300 feet square - there is 3 Catholick Churchs & the Relic's of 3 or 4 more old delapitated Churches that were one(ce) venerable Edefices but now the cankering worm of time has deminished their beauty very much…" (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $3,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
386 c   Per Santa Fe Express, manuscript directive on folded letter with integral address leaf datelined Fort Mann Upper Arkansas (River), December 6th, 1847 addressed to President
James K. Polk, and carried by military express over the Santa Fe traiPer Santa Fe Express, manuscript directive on folded letter with integral address leaf datelined "Fort Mann Upper Arkansas (River), December 6th, 1847" addressed to President James K. Polk, and carried by military express over the Santa Fe trail to Fort Leavenworth, where it entered the mails with "Fort Leavenworth, Mo./Dec 25" datestamp and manuscript "10" rate, which was then written over with an "f" because it was free to the President, docketed by W.R. Marcy, Secretary of War to Polk, toned file fold through the postmark, fine.The writer, Captain Napoleon Koscialowski of the Indian Battalion of the Missouri Volunteers, writes his desire to resign to President James K. Polk.Fort Mann was located on the Santa Fe Trail about 26 miles below the "Cimarron Crossing" of the Arkansas River. It was an adobe stockade built about 1846 by the U.S. Government as a repair and supply depot for the army. In freighting days it was 359 miles from Fort Leavenworth and 423 miles to Santa Fe. The post was abandoned in 1854. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,300.00
Will close during Public Auction
387   [Illinois Volunteers on the Santa Fe Trail] Sixteen letters from members of the 1st Illinois Volunteers, traveling on the Santa Fe Trail in the summer and fall of 1847 and returning in 1848. Though the fighting had ended in that part of the eventual Mexican cession, soldiers were being sent to hold it for the United States. The letters begin upon a steamer in the Missouri River at Boonville, Missouri, and follow the regiment to Ft. Leavenworth, Cottonwood Creek (near current-day Lost Spring, KS), Cold Spring (in what is now the Oklahoma panhandle), and Santa Fe, with one letter from Cold Spring on the return trip. Most are to John Snyder in Bellville, IL, from his brother William. The soldiers raise hell in Missouri, foraging and even stealing alcohol. The trek is at first a "pleasure trip...We have found the most beautiful country" rather than the dry brush they were told about. But that was still in Kansas!In Santa Fe, they meet Pueblo Indians, whom William describes as "the descendants of Montezuma's old subjects...A much finer and braver race of people than the Spaniards. At the battle of Texas...last winter, they stood till they were bayoneted while the Mexicans ran at the sight of a gun. They use the bow & lance pretty generally, the white man not being willing to sell them guns." With much interesting content on sickness in the ranks, searches for Sterling Price (who had gone south to Chihuahua), and William's growing collection of Native American artifacts, meteorites, and other curiosities from the Old Southwest. Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $17,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
388 c   [The E.B. Bateman correspondence] the important group of nineteen folded letters with integral address leaves written between January 1st, 1848 and February 14th, 1852 by E.B.
Bateman, a surgeon in the U.S. Army who served in the Mexican War at S[The E.B. Bateman correspondence] the important group of nineteen folded letters with integral address leaves written between January 1st, 1848 and February 14th, 1852 by E.B. Bateman, a surgeon in the U.S. Army who served in the Mexican War at Santa Fe and then got "Gold Fever" and travelled 135 days overland from there to California, to his father in Jacksonville, Illinois and his brother in St. Charles, Missouri, the first letter written Jan. 1st, 1848 from Laurenceville, Illinois while travelling, then April 22nd from St. Louis, May 14th and 18th from Fort Leavenworth, two on June 13th datelined "Plains - Council Grove, one hundred & fifty miles from Ft. Leavenworth", then "Fort Man Indian Territory, half way to Santa Fe July 2nd, 1848" and "Wagon Mound 120 miles from Santa Fe July 23rd, 1848", followed by eight letters from Santa Fe from August 26th, 1848 to April 4th, 1849 that were carried up the Santa Fe Trail by military express or private courier, entering the mails at Independence or St. Louis, and describing his experiences, talking about starting a medical practice in Santa Fe, marrying a local woman for money and trying to talk his brother into coming down and being a lawyer or photographer, in the last of these he writes his brother of his intent to go to California in search of gold along with a detailed account of the route he intends to take, next are two great letters from Sullivan, California, one dated August 26th, 1849 (transcribed below) that entered the mails with "San Francisco, Cal./Oct 1" datestamp and manuscript "40" rate, the other dated Sept. 30th, 1849 with manuscript "Stockton, T.C. (Territory of California)/Oct 4th" postmark and "San Francisco, Cal. Nov 1" datestamp with matching "40" rate with "Via Panama" directive, the correspondence ends with the 1852 letter, some covers with aging, mostly fine-very fine.E.B. Bateman writes his father upon arrival in the California gold fields: "I arrived on the 20th inst. after a very tedious journey of 135 days from Santa Fe. Our rout was down the Rio Grande 150 miles to Socoro, thence across the mountains to the head-waters of the Rio Gila, thence down that river to a point six miles below its mouth where we crossed the Rio Colorado of the West; thence across the Great Desert & through the mountains again to the Puablo Los Angalos, or 'City of Angels', thence on & near the coast northward about 250 miles, thence eastward across the mountains again to the head of the Tulalles Lake in the Tulary Valley, thence across & up the Rio del Rey, or Kings River to the point where it emenates from the base of the Siere Nevada, thence a northwesterly course up the valley & across the Mercey, Tuwalamie, Merri-posas, Stanish-Low & a branch of the San Jouquin Rivers to Stockton; thence to his place 75 miles; which is a small stream emptying into the Tuwalamie twelve miles distant.""From the point where I last struck into the mountains you will perceive a great digression from the ordinary rout. This was owing to our having fallen in with a detachment, of Dragoons dispatched to the head of Kings River to chastise some Indians who had recently killed a party of Americans & we thought it a good opportunity to penetrate where others had failed & have the first chance at the Gold which is said to exist there in great quantity, but greatly to our disappointment on arriving in about two days travel of the designated point we learned the Indians had fled far into the snowy mountains…The Gold region as far as discovered, you will perceive has two great natural divisions by the water-courses they contain, the one with the Sacremento & the other the San Jouquin & their tributaries. I am in the last mentioned region…I intend to practice medicine & what leisure I may have spend in picking up loose Gold scattered about the surface…" He also comments on the cost of living in the gold-rush days of California. (Image) Est. $10,000-15,000

SOLD for $18,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
389 c   Las Vegas, New Mexico, April 29th 1848 dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf to Belleville, Illinois, carried by military express to the Missouri River where it
was placed on board a steamboat bound for St. Louis, entered the mailsLas Vegas, New Mexico, April 29th 1848 dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf to Belleville, Illinois, carried by military express to the Missouri River where it was placed on board a steamboat bound for St. Louis, entered the mails in St. Louis with their red straightline "STEAM" handstamp and manuscript "20" collect rate, very fine.William S. Fleming, a Sargent in the Co. E, 1st regiment Illinois Volunteers writes: "...We have just received news from Chihuahua that Genl Price has had an engagement with the Mexicans in which as a matter of course the American arms were victorious. The Mexicans under Genl Armijo & Gov Trias of Chihuahua and others had fortified themselves at a small town about 60 miles below the latter city when Genl Price and Major Walker of the Santa Fe Battalion came up with them. An unconditional surrender of the place was demanded by Genl P. but was flatly refused by the enemy and immediately the town was fired upon by our troops and answered with a brisk fire by the enemy. The conflict continued for about 18 hours after which time the enemy surrendered. A great many officers of distinction were taken prisoners but were soon discharged on Parole of honor. The most of them are now in Santa Fe. A few days since Mr. Aubry a Trader arrived at this place from Independence in 30 days. He brought the welcome news that the Peace was about to be made..."The last battle of the Mexican War, Santa Cruz de Rosalita, March 16, 1848. General Sterling Price went to Santa Cruz where he confronted Trias and demanded surrender. Trias requested Price to hold off until the rumor that a peace treaty had been concluded, could be verified. Price agreed and after waiting several days, without any confirmation, he commenced the action that ended in the surrender of the Mexicans. Shortly, thereafter, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was confirmed and the city of Chihuahua was turned over to the Mexican authorities. The Mexicans lost 300 killed and wounded and the Americans 5 killed and 20 wounded. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $5,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
390 c   Santa Fe, New Mexico, April 24, 1848 first dateline on four page letter of William H. Snyder to his brother John back in Illinois:"We have had here the mildest winter that I ever experienced…The Mexicans are strict observers of Lent…Though they are desperate scoundrels, they are nevertheless strict observers of the ceremonies of their creed. during Lent there has not been a single Fandango Yet and Easter Sunday are scarcely over, when the thing is opened again with full blast…""Next Monday, (1st May) I am off for a campaign against the Navijo Indians. Our detachment will consist of one hundred and fifty Missouri Volunteers under Maj. Reynolds and fifty Illinoisans…Our campaign will lie through one of the roughest and most desolate regions in the world, being that Country between this territory and the California basin…You need not however discontinue writing or sending me papers for upon the arrival of every mail here, an express will be sent on after us, with such matters as belongs to the detachment…Governor Armijo, was captured by Genl Price in an action last month at Santa Cruz. He is now upon his parole and residing at Albuquerque…I wonder how the old fellow will feel when he finds me, a U.S. Volunteer occupying the most spacious room in his old Palace (the Palace of the Governors)?"Armijo was not captured. He fled to Chihuahua, but returned to Santa Fe, becoming a citizen of the Territory of New Mexico. Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
391 c   Santa Fe, Nov 20 (1848), clear manuscript military provisional government postmark on Bateman correspondence folded letter with integral address leaf to Jacksonville, Illinois,
carried up the Santa Fe trail by military express and entered the maiSanta Fe, Nov 20 (1848), clear manuscript military provisional government postmark on Bateman correspondence folded letter with integral address leaf to Jacksonville, Illinois, carried up the Santa Fe trail by military express and entered the mails with "Fort Leavenworth, Mo./Feb 1" datestamp and manuscript "10" rate, trivial edge stain at top right, very fine.E.B. Bateman writes his father: "...The Express mail leaves on tomorrow the 20th by a friend and acquantance of mine (Mr. Newman) who offers to take my letters in his private packages & will probably reach Ft Leavenworth in about 20 days..." (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $8,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
392 c   [With Kit Carson as our guide] buff cover with manuscript Santa FeJuly 1749 military manuscript postmark to Perrysburgh, Ohio with original letter, carried up the Santa Fe
Trail by military express and entered the mails at Jefferson Barrack["With Kit Carson as our guide"] buff cover with manuscript "Santa Fe/July 17/49" military manuscript postmark to Perrysburgh, Ohio with original letter, carried up the Santa Fe Trail by military express and entered the mails at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri with green "X" handstamped rate, cover wear at top right just affecting the postmark, fine; the latest recorded Santa Fe postmark under military government.Edward T. Tremaine writes to David Ladd that he has been appointed as a Deputy Collector of Customs and will probably be stationed at San Diego, California. He then describes in great detail his journey down the Santa Fe Trail from Fort Leavenworth, in part: "We have had a tedious and tiresome journey thus far…We started from Fort Leavenworth on the 17th of May - our own party consisted of about 30 men on horse back. We had an Escort of 50 Dragoons, with 35 six mule waggons carrying baggage and provisions for 150 days, for each man…Santa Fe is nothing under the Heavens but a collection of mud houses as you approach it looks very much like a large brick yard before the bricks are burnt. The houses are all of one story & built of what the natives call Adobes, a sun burnt brick - they are nothing more that sods, cut from the ground about 15X8 inches thick, dried in the sun until they are hard enough to handel, & then put up with mud - the roof are all flat, there is no regularity to the streets & the natives are a most miserable looking set of beings. We shall remain here probably a week longer and then proceed direct to San Francisco on Pack Mules with Kit Carson as our guide - where we expect to arrive in about 40 days- We anticipate a hurried an tiresome journey & we all wish most heartily that it was accomplished, but we are possessed with considerable patience & perseverance & I doubt not that we shall finaly get there…"It is very probable that Kit Carson did act as their guide but only long enough to get them started in the right direction. In Jan/Feb of 1849, Charles Fremont spent three weeks with Carson and he wanted Kit to go onto California with him, but Carson's wife was pregnant and this was probably the reason he did not go. Fremont took the southern route and that was probably the same route followed by the Tremaine party. The 1855 Official U.S. Register lists Tremaine as a customs collector at San Diego. Apparently he did not succumb to the "gold rush fever" as many did in 1849. (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $5,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
393 c   Soccoro, New Mexico, 1849 folded letter with integral address leaf with manuscript Paid to Ft. LeavenworthH.W. EdgarP MSoccoro, N.M.Nov 2049 military period postmark and with
directive Via San Antonio, though it is doubtful that it wentSoccoro, New Mexico, 1849 folded letter with integral address leaf with manuscript "Paid to Ft. Leavenworth/H.W. Edgar/P M/Soccoro, N.M./Nov 20/49" military period postmark and with directive "Via San Antonio", though it is doubtful that it went that way as the military was running regular expresses directly to Fort Leavenworth, entered the mails with red "Fort Leavenworth, Mo./Feb 7" datestamp and matching "5" rate handstamp, addressed to Coleman Younger (Coleman and William Younger were famous as guerillas with William Quantrill in the Civil War and later rode with the James boys as bank robbers), extremely fine; the only known Soccoro postmark during the military period; ex-Haas.A most interesting letter by William L. Smith, a forty-niner on the Mexican Gold Trail on his way to the California gold fields via the old El Camino Real to Mazatlan and thence by steamer to San Francisco. Smith goes into detail on his plans from Soccoro to Mazatlan, via Chihuahua and Durango. He is travelling by a two mule carriage and plans to form up with a company of Americans, because of the dangers of passing through a country plagued by Indian marauders and robbers.Soccoro is located on the west bank of the Rio Grande River. At the time of this letter it was a small adobe village under military occupation. It was garrisoned by a detachment of the U.S. Dragoons until the organization of the territorial government on 9 September, 1850. (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $45,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
394 c   [Old Fort Mann on the Santa Fe Trail] folded letter with integral address leaf datelined Camp near Old Fort Mann Arkansas River, Sept 3d, 1850, per the letter it was carried by
an Army wagon train over the Santa Fe Trail to Independence, Missou[Old Fort Mann on the Santa Fe Trail] folded letter with integral address leaf datelined "Camp near Old Fort Mann Arkansas River, Sept 3d, 1850", per the letter it was carried by an Army wagon train over the Santa Fe Trail to Independence, Missouri, where it entered the mails with their red September 26 datestamp and matching "10" rate handstamp to Kalamazoo, Michigan, stain at upper right, otherwise very fine; ex-Baughman.An officer writes his mother: "Dearest Mother We did not march but 100 miles above the Crossing before we met Col Sumner coming down, and we all faced about and have been camping along the River, until now we are encamped twenty miles below the Crossing (of the Arkansas River). An express mail from Leavenworth reached us to-day…The new post will be located near here…I hope to go in with Col Sumner and our Battery, which will start back by the 20th of this month. This letter will be carried by a train of empty wagons now passing from Santa Fe. Our expedition is pretty much of a failure, as all the Indians hostile to the Americans, except the Comanches, have gone up into the mountains. So we have had no fighting to do. To day Col Sumner held a council with some of the Chiefs of two tribes which was an imposing farce & humbug in both sides…"Fort Mann in April, 1847 was in the unorganized territory, known as the "Indian country." Located on the Arkansas, about eight miles west of Dodge City, Kansas, twenty five miles east of the Cimarron Crossing of the Arkansas River. It was abandoned in 1850 and replaced by Fort Atkinson, about two miles west of Dodge City, as related to in the letter. Built by the 6th Infantry under Captain William Hoffman, who became a major 1851, Lt. Col. 1860, Brig. Genl. 1865, died Aug. 12, 1884. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $675.00
Will close during Public Auction
395   [Santa Fe Trail by Stagecoach] Three exceptional letters by J.F.S. to Annie, undoubtedly his wife, all from the summer of 1864 along the Santa Fe Trail, which he travels in a
stage with five other passengers. From Ft. Lyon in present-day Colora[Santa Fe Trail by Stagecoach] Three exceptional letters by "J.F.S." to Annie, undoubtedly his wife, all from the summer of 1864 along the Santa Fe Trail, which he travels in a stage with five other passengers. From Ft. Lyon in present-day Colorado, he writes that they've arrived safely after passing through the worst part of the Indian country. "We travelled up the Arkansas river 270 miles, and go 40 more before crossing and leaving it...The Indian difficulties have disturbed everything out here, so that communication with the States is almost entirely cut off...Up to this time I have not met a soul I ever saw before - all strangers; but all clever people."Three days later he is at Bent's Fort in the Colorado Territory, once the greatest fur trading post in the West: "The Indian difficulties are getting worse and worse. Just now a small squad of soldiers got here from Denver City...When about fifty miles from here they found an ambulance and wagon, and three dead men, murdered by the Indians. The party consisting of a blacksmith by the name of John Snyder and wife, and two soldiers...on their way to Fort Lyon when they were surprised by about forty Indians. The men were killed and the woman carried off. Several arrows were still sticking in the dead bodies...These murders are becoming a daily occurrence, and the whole country is terror-stricken...The bushwhackers have been very bold in this region this summer. Their leader was recently captured...His name is Jim Reynolds - son of old Tom Reynoldes...whom I knew well years ago. He will be shot."By August 24, they reach Maxwell's Ranch in New Mexico: "We are out of all danger and in 150 miles of Santa Fe...Our trip has been exceedingly slow...We traveled no night excepting the first two out from Kansas City...At this place - the crossing of the Cimerron - there is…(a settlement, with) a large mill, carding machine, etc., all belonging to Mr. Lucien B. Maxwell, formerly of Kaskaskia, Illinois." All are in nearly flawless condition. (imagea) (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $5,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
396 c   [Indian terror on the Santa Fe Trail, 1868] orange cover with well centered 3c Rose (65) cancelled by target and with matching double circle Bents FortAug 28 Colorado
Territorial datestamp alongside to Middlefield Center, N.Y., with original[Indian terror on the Santa Fe Trail, 1868] orange cover with well centered 3c Rose (#65) cancelled by target and with matching double circle "Bent's Fort/Aug 28" Colorado Territorial datestamp alongside to Middlefield Center, N.Y., with original letter, cover edge faults at lower right, fine.The great six page letter from Lew Barnum relates to the continuing Indian problems of the Colorado and Kansas frontier in the late 1860's: "...The Red Skins have broke out again killing & steeling all they come across…I for one have not lost any Indians & am quite shure shall not hunt for any. The nearest they have been to us here is 35 miles - reported they were quite a band of them come into new Bents fort - drove off 21 mules & horses & killed 2 men, down on the borders Kansas they made there first rade - killed 12 families men wimin & children. Captured 2 young ladys ravished them to death. by what I can judge they have killed not less than 50 people & only broke out two weeks ago. Report sayes Kansas is red hot raising up companey & going for them devles. You have but little Idear how the People in this western countres suffer by the Indian lovers, if thar wer not so much money in the Indian beureau the poor Indians would not have quite so many friends, Government send out they commistoners to make treatys. Never have they made one but what the Indians have got at least $10,000 for every white person they have killed." (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,700.00
Will close during Public Auction
397   The Missionary Herald., Volumes 19-26 and 36-37 only, in eight bound books, Boston, Crocker and Brewster, 1823-41. 8vo, all half leather with marbled boards. Usual cover wear,
but sharp condition.The Missionary Herald., Volumes 19-26 and 36-37 only, in eight bound books, Boston, Crocker and Brewster, 1823-41. 8vo, all half leather with marbled boards. Usual cover wear, but sharp condition. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $600.00
Will close during Public Auction
398   Adventures of the First Settlers on the Oregon or Columbia River., Alexander Ross. London, Smith, Elder & Co, 1849. 12mo, half leather (Gross) with banded and gilt spine.
Fold-out map at front, backed with linen. Risvold label on first endpapAdventures of the First Settlers on the Oregon or Columbia River., Alexander Ross. London, Smith, Elder & Co, 1849. 12mo, half leather (Gross) with banded and gilt spine. Fold-out map at front, backed with linen. Risvold label on first endpaper. Offset from map on title page. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $425.00
Will close during Public Auction
399 c   [Maine to Oregon via Hawaii] 1838-39, folded letter with integral address leaf originating with Brunswick, MeApr 18 (1838) datestamp and manuscript 10 rate, addressed to Mrs
Mary Walker in care of the Mission Rooms at East Baldwin, Maine who[Maine to Oregon via Hawaii] 1838-39, folded letter with integral address leaf originating with "Brunswick, Me/Apr 18" (1838) datestamp and manuscript "10" rate, addressed to Mrs Mary Walker in care of the Mission Rooms at East Baldwin, Maine who forwarded it to the Boston Mission Rooms with the endorsement "Mission West of/Rocky Mts.", then forwarded outside of the mails when the first opportunity arrived, by ship via Cape Horn and the Sandwich Islands to the Columbia River in Oregon, overall even toning, fine.This letter by John C. Richardson to his sister Mary Richardson Walker was written just 30 days after she left home for Oregon. It was probably among those letters delivered by William Gray to Mary Walker on 16 September, 1839 - the very same day that she received the overland letter via the Munger/Griffin party offered in this sale. (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $2,400.00
Will close during Public Auction
400 c   [The Oregon Missions and Henry Bridgeman Brewer] group of five folded letters with integral address leaves addressed to Brewer between 1839 and 1849, the first three in 1839 prior to his departure on the Lausanne, one in which Rev. Jason Lee gives his advice on the forthcoming voyage of the Methodist Mission to Oregon and one from his sister, the fourth from his brother addressed to him in April, 1842 while at the Oregon Mission that was carried around Cape Horn and via the Sandwich Islands (stained) and the last a long Feb. 19th, 1849 letter from Rev. Perkins.Henry Bridgeman Brewer was born at Wilbraham, Mass on 7 July, 1813 and died 24 January, 1886. On 9 October, 1839 he sailed with the Methodist Episcopal Mission on the Lausanne, via Cape Horn, arriving off Fort Vancouver 1 June, 1840. He served as farmer, teacher and translator at the Wascopum Mission at the Dalles of the Columbia River until 1847, when the Mission was transferred to the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. He returned to Wilbraham in January of 1847. Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $575.00
Will close during Public Auction

Previous Page, Next Page or Return to Table of Contents


StampAuctionCentral and StampAuctionNetwork are
Copyright © 1994-2016 Droege Computing Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Back to Top of Page