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EXPLORATION AND WAR continued...

THE MEXICAN WAR continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
361 c   [Occupation of Tampico, Mexico] two folded letters with integral address leaves with provisional military markings that were carried to New Orleans by Naval transports, first
with manuscript TampicoJany 12 1847 postmark that entered the mails[Occupation of Tampico, Mexico] two folded letters with integral address leaves with provisional military markings that were carried to New Orleans by Naval transports, first with manuscript "Tampico/Jany 12" 1847 postmark that entered the mails with "New Orleans, La/Jan 24" datestamp and matching "SHIP" and "12" handstamps, second with straightline "Tampico" handstamp, matching "10" rate and manuscript "May 8" 1847 date that entered the mails with blue "New Orleans, La/May 24" datestamp, then forwarded to New York with manuscript "10" rate for a total of 20c due, very fine duo.Tampico is located on the Gulf of Mexico about 270 miles south of the mouth of the Rio Grande River. On October 28th, 1846, with the outbreak of the war with Mexico, Santa Anna withdrew the garrison from the port city of Tampico. On November 14th, Commodore David Conner with two Naval steamers, four schooner gunboats and a landing party of 300 men seized the port and placed it under military occupation. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $800.00
Will close during Public Auction
362 c   [Vera Cruz - Naval Correspondence] General Winfield Scott arrived at Anton Lizardo on 4 March, 1847 and on the 9th he landed 8,600 troops on Collado Beach before Vera Cruz, this correspondence of seven folded letters with integral address leaves were written by George M. Ransom while on board the U.S.S. Fredonia between 20th February, 1847 and 5 July, 1847, except one written on board the Prize Schooner Mahonese. Ransom, who was a Passed Midshipman at the time he wrote the letters, entered the Navy in 1839 and would rise to the rank of Commodore in 1877, gives an eye witness account of the siege and bombardment of Vera Cruz and the Castle of San Juan d'Ulloa. The covers all entered the mails with New Orleans datestamps and large "10" rate handstamps to Richfield Springs, N.Y., except one that entered the mails at Pensacola, Florida, very fine.The following are extracts from the letters: "March 9th I steal a moment from duty to tell you that the army has landed this morning...already the fighting has commenced - Oh, it is a grand scene! Heavens! what a deafening roar of great guns!...March 22nd (on board Prize Schooner Mahonese)...I'm Captain! I was ordered this morning to take charge of this Schooner pro-tem - a beautiful vessel - taken a short time since from the Mexicans...The Steamers Mississippi, Spitfire & Vixen, and all the Schooners, have already hauled in close under the walls of the City and the firing is now tremendous..." Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $5,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
363 c   Army of the West, Chihuahua, March 6th 1847, manuscript military endorsement and 10 rate on folded letter with integral address leaf written on captured stationery of the
Government of Chihuahua to General Hinton at Delaware, Ohio, carried by mArmy of the West, Chihuahua, March 6th 1847, manuscript military endorsement and "10" rate on folded letter with integral address leaf written on captured stationery of the Government of Chihuahua to General Hinton at Delaware, Ohio, carried by military express north to Santa Fe and then up the Santa Fe Trail, entered the mails with "Independence, Mo./May 25" datestamp, cover with worn vertical file fold, otherwise fine.The letter from Lt. Hinton of the Missouri Horse Guards, a member of Doniphan's Expedition, gives an eye-witness account of the Battle of Sacramento and vividly describes the action: "...We met the enemy in force at 'Sacramento' a 'rancho'...25 miles north (Chihuahua, Mexico)...They had fortified...and mounted 12 pieces of cannon...we limbered our guns and advanced about 200 yards and let them have it...then set the mounted riflemen after them...the enemy fled in confusion..." (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $14,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
364 c   Brazos, June 15, 1847, two-line straightline postmark and matching 10 handstamped rate on fresh folded letter with integral address leaf to Major Richard Delafied at New York
City datelined Camp U.S.A. near Monterey28 May 1847, extremely finBrazos, June 15, 1847, two-line straightline postmark and matching "10" handstamped rate on fresh folded letter with integral address leaf to Major Richard Delafied at New York City datelined "Camp U.S.A. near Monterey/28 May 1847", extremely fine.Interesting letter by Colonel Joseph Mansfield mentioning the possibility of Taylor's and Scott's two armies converging on Mexico City and commentary on the conquest of Mexico and final boundaries between the two countries: "...My own opinion is that Congress should without hesitation annex upper California & New Mexico as Territories…And this too without consulting Mexico further. And then hold our Troops at the foot of the Sierra Madres from Monterey &c to Tampico and also all the Sea Coast till such time as might please these people to make peace. These people are a disorganized mass of population of inferior blood. The characteristics of the Negro & Indian particularly as to color are prominent in them. Now & Then you see a little of the pure Castillian blood."Joseph King Fenno Mansfield graduated 2nd in the West Point class of 1817. At the time this letter was written he was a Colonel in the Engineer Corps; later a Major General in 1862. He was killed at the bloody Battle of Antietam after 45 years of service. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $425.00
Will close during Public Auction
365 c   Castle Perote, June 5, 1847, manuscript endorsement on folded letter with integral address leaf to Pennsylvania, very fine.The letter from Captain F. M. Wynkoop talks in detail
about guerilla incursions in his area and: >I...We have news from thCastle Perote, June 5, 1847, manuscript endorsement on folded letter with integral address leaf to Pennsylvania, very fine.The letter from Captain F. M. Wynkoop talks in detail about guerilla incursions in his area and: >I"...We have news from the Capitol (Mexico City) which says that he (Santa Anna) is elected President and that Lombardi (General, wounded at Buena Vista) is fortifying against us 15 miles this side of the city of Mexico - We shall then have another fight soon and after that Mexico is ours - The inhabitants of the city are much alarmed and are evacuating it rapidly..." (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $180.00
Will close during Public Auction
366 c   [Army Wife Correspondence] of three historically informative letters from Jefferson Barracks and Fort Leavenworth, Missouri, 1847, 1848 and 1849 from Laura Sperry to her son Anson back in Illinois dated August 9, 1847, September 30, 1848 and May 8, 1849 on the exciting times of the Mexican War and American expansion to California and Oregon, last with toned file fold through the postmark, otherwise very fine.In the first letter Laura writes: "...Last Friday news was received that Genl Scott had entered the City of Mexico on the 17th ult. (Scott entered Mexico City September 14th)...We are waiting with great impatience to hear the truth...Mrs Kearney has brought her family to the barracks on account of her infants being sick Mrs Kearney expects her husband early in in Sept…I suppose you have seen the difficulty he has had with Com Stockton & Col Fremont."In the second letter Laura Sperry writes to Anson from Fort Leavenworth under date of September 30, 1848: "Col H. (Ethan Allen Hitchcock) had been here & staid 2 or 3 weeks, & was ordered down to Independence to muster out troops coming in from the south & west (Mexican war)...He was ordered up here to be in readiness with his company to escort Gov Lane & the officers of the Territory (of Oregon)…the Gov, finally concluded to take the second Leut. (Hawkins) & 25 men & have the rest to come on when the other officials should arrive, which he tho't would not be till spring. It was already so late that he was obliged to go by St Fee (Santa Fe), & from there to St Deigo thence by sea to Astoria (Oregon); a long & tedious march. We hear from them oucsionlly by the troops coming in, as getting on well. Gov Lane expects his family out with us in the spring & other families will go along ..."The third letter postmarked Fort Leavenworth, Mo, May 8 (1849), refers to the army expeditions to purchase Fort Laramie, the march of the Mounted Riflemen to Oregon and the military escorts for the Santa Fe Trail following the Mexican War. Laura Sperry writes to her son those exciting times: "...The Rifles are encamped 3 miles from here but the ladies are all in garrison till they move, which is day after tomorrow. Of course we are full to over flowing. Not only the rifles but a company on infantry to each post, that is at Kearney - Laramie & a post to be built at Bear river near Ft Hall (Cantonment Loring about five miles above Ft. Hall), & all the troops for St Fee (Santa Fe) & the escorts of officers are here." Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $1,900.00
Will close during Public Auction
367   [Battles of Contreras and Churubusco] Excellent content autograph letter signed by future Governor of Kansas Territory James W. Denver, September 1, 1847, from Mixcoaca, near
Mexico City, to his sister. A lengthy 8-page letter about the bloody ad[Battles of Contreras and Churubusco] Excellent content autograph letter signed by future Governor of Kansas Territory James W. Denver, September 1, 1847, from Mixcoaca, near Mexico City, to his sister. A lengthy 8-page letter about the bloody advance of American troops on Mexico City from Vera Cruz. At National Bridge on July 21, though the bridge was obstructed and Mexican forces defended it from high ground, "fire was returned by our troops, when with a shout they burst over every barrier, scaled the heights, and carried everything before them with ease - for the reason that the Mexicans had all run away before our men got to the top...Strange to say in this fight where our men were crowded on a narrow bridge in point blank shot...not a man was killed..."On the 19th "…Gen. Twiggs halted under the guns of a battery of twenty four heavy pieces of artillery...at a place called San Bartolo or Contrerias. Gen. Pillow's division advanced to support Twiggs, and it is said that some of the regiments were uselessly and foolishly pushed forward through a cornfield which was completely swept by the gund from the enemy's fort...Our men were compelled to run through this cornfield, exposed to a murderous fire of balls, shells, grape, and canister." With much more great content. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $1,300.00
Will close during Public Auction
368 c   Forwarded by the N.O. Delta Courier, pointing hand blue straightline handstamp on Dec 19th 1847 folded letter with integral address leaf to Washington, City, MexicoDec 25th
1847 manuscript postmark and 10 rate, carried by private Mexican WForwarded by the N.O. "Delta" Courier, pointing hand blue straightline handstamp on Dec 19th 1847 folded letter with integral address leaf to Washington, City, "Mexico/Dec 25th 1847" manuscript postmark and "10" rate, carried by private Mexican War Express to New Orleans where it entered the mails with "New Orleans, La./Jan 14" datestamp, toned file fold through the handstamp, fine and rate; one of only two known examples.This was a private mail express organized by James L. Frearner of the New Orleans Daily Delta. The Mexican War was the first war to be comprehensively reported in the daily newspapers of the nation and rivalry was keen among the war correspondents. Because the mails were slow and irregular, Frearner hired his own couriers to carry his war dispatches to his newspaper in New Orleans. As a courtesy he offered to carry private mail for officer friends who wished to send letters home. On the arrival of the courier the newspaper applied the handstamp and placed the letter in the New Orleans Post Office.The letter by Captain Henry Pope refers to a resignation that he wishes to have withdrawn. The docket on the back of the cover indicates that it is too late - that the resignation was accepted on Dec. 31, 1847. Henry Pope was killed in a duel in May, 1848. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $3,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
369   [Soldiers Letters] Group of six American soldiers letters from the Mexican-American War. Four are by John Cornock, who would later emigrate to California (see his letters in
that section), all to his sister, Ann. He initially joins the army wit[Soldiers' Letters] Group of six American soldiers' letters from the Mexican-American War. Four are by John Cornock, who would later emigrate to California (see his letters in that section), all to his sister, Ann. He initially joins the army without telling his family and finds himself at Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn, whence he writes back to Albany. In the dragoons, he took part in the assault on Tulansingo, and briefly describes it. Another soldier, Benjamin Wingate, writes home to Indiana from Puebla in August 1847 to say that he is going to serve under Franklin Pierce and they are readying to move out. They would later fight in the Battle of Contreras, in which Pierce was wounded. "I have no doubt that be fore you read this letter that the fate of a many a blooming youth will be sealed...I expect to write my next letter in the City of Mexico." The final letter is by Charles W. Foster, who started the war as a private and would finish as sergeant, becoming a colonel in the US Civil War. With a letter by William R. Sellon from Saltillo, March 4, 1847, describing the capture of the town, the sorry state of Mexican conscripts, and Santa Anna's excuses: "He was forced into the fight by the Mexican Congress...They would not furnish him with money nor provisions." With another soldier's letter from Vera Cruz later that month. (imagea) (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
370   [Palo Alto, W.W.S. Bliss and others] An important group of letters from participants. Two are to the soldier and scholar E.A. Hitchcock, from camp opposite Matamoras, May 14,
1846, and written on the letterhead of the general in chief of the Me[Palo Alto, W.W.S. Bliss and others] An important group of letters from participants. Two are to the soldier and scholar E.A. Hitchcock, from "camp opposite Matamoras," May 14, 1846, and written on the letterhead of the general in chief of the Mexican 4th Military Division, gives Zachary Taylor no credit for the victory at Palo Alto on May 8: "The battle was won without an order or a maneuver from the Genl, solely by the impetuosity and daring of officer & men."The next, by W.W.S. Bliss, on July 23. Among the exceptional military information he provides, he tells that not long after he joined Gen. Taylor at Palo Alto, "a cannon ball coming obliquely from a Mexican battery on the left struck my horse in the left shoulder and came out at his breast. He instantly fell with me, but rose again to his feet when unsaddled. As he evidently could not live I caused him to be shot...The General was on my left...The ball passed just in front of his horse...At any rate we were under no heavy fire; but late in the afternoon, the General & his staff ewere exposed to great danger." A letter from aboard the US Store Ship Fredonia at Vera Cruz in July 1847 is full of a sailor named Gregory's pining after his wife, and mentions his desire to return to the Naval Observatory. In November, E.J. Blamire writes a friend in Virginia that "The heat here in the middle of the day is as great as it is with you in August." Finally, with a military Order Signed by "Irwin McDowell / A.A.G." directing that ordinance is to be inspected before being claimed as unserviceable. With a tinted engraving of Palo Alto. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $2,800.00
Will close during Public Auction
371   [Charles Webster Correspondence] Battle of Vera Cruz US Consul Tehauntepec Route Board and interesting collection of over 144 letters and documents by and about Charles R.
Webster, a US quartermaster in the 1st NY Infantry during the Mexican Wa[Charles Webster Correspondence] Battle of Vera Cruz; US Consul; Tehauntepec Route Board and interesting collection of over 144 letters and documents by and about Charles R. Webster, a US quartermaster in the 1st NY Infantry during the Mexican War and subsequently US consul in Tehuantepec, where he is involved in a plan to build a railroad across the narrowest part of Mexico to serve travelers to the west coast of North America. The group spans from his college years in 1837 to 1869. Webster is part of the wave that traveled under General Winfield Scott. Landing at Tampico, he meets the famous Ann Chase, wife of the US consul, who had raised the American flag when troops landed in the city. In one especially fine letter, he gives his account of the Battle of Buena Vista, where the fleet lands just below the city. He gives the order of battle, explaining, "The bombardment commenced on Monday evening about 3 PM and on Friday following the town capitulated unconditionally." Later he moves on to Jalapa and then Puebla with his train of supplies, and nearly shoots a Texas Ranger on the way, thinking he is a bandito! The collection gives his opinion of the locals, beautiful descriptions of scenery and landmarks, gossip about generals Wool and Pillow, and some stranger sides to a quarter master's work. He then goes to Washington to settle the army's accounts, where he attends a levee with the outgoing James Polk and sees Dolley Madison at the White House. Webster becomes involved in the survey being made of the Tehuantepec isthmus by Maj. John G. Bernard with an eye toward building a railroad across it. Since as consul he is at the disposal of American citizens, many of his letters discuss getting mail from the region to the United States. He writes in June 1851 that the survey work is nearly done. In March 1853, commissioners arrive to "take formal possession of the right of way across this Isthmus, lately conceded by the now dictatorial government" under Santa Anna. Webster remains in Tehuantepec through 1855, where he reports in May on the Revolution of Ayutla. In April 1857, he sees the first American vessel arrive at Tehuantepec from California. However, by 1860 he is on his way back to Washington and has to wrangle with the State Department and Post Office Department for money owed him for his services. Much of the exceptional content cannot be recounted here; worth perusal.With Book: The First Regiment of New York Volunteers...in the Mexican War. Clark, Francis D., NY, George S. Evans, 1882. First edition. Blue cloth with gilt title. Edges rubbed, with bumped corners and spine ends. Juvenile pencil markings on front endpapers. Risvold label on pastedown. (imagea) (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $9,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
372   [Mexican War balance] Letters Group of twelve letters from soldiers involved in the Mexican War, 1846-51. They include the usual complaints about money criticism of the
prosecution of the war news of victories impressions of the major figures[Mexican War balance] Letters Group of twelve letters from soldiers involved in the Mexican War, 1846-51. They include the usual complaints about money; criticism of the prosecution of the war; news of victories; impressions of the major figures of the day; descriptions of the country; even accounts of Mexican women. The single post-war letter concerns a meeting of the Western Pennsylvania Scott Convention. One letter of 1848 has the added distinction of being written by B.S. Alexander, who would do important engineering work in the Civil War and later in California.With the Books: The Mexican War and its Warriors. J. Frost. New Haven and Philadelphia, H. Mansfield, 1850. 4to, original cloth with elaborate gilt spine. Color frontis. Owner's 1872 pencil note on free endpaper. Foxed, some rubbing of exterior. Also The Other Side: or, Notes for the History of the War Between Mexico and the United States. NY, John Wiley, 1850. 8vo, brown cloth with stamped over, gilt spine. Ten portraits, fourteen maps. Some foxing inside, cracked front hinge. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,600.00
Will close during Public Auction
373 c   [Mexican War, substantial postal history balance] 43 covers, mostly mounted and written up on album pages, largely folded letters with integral address leaves from soldiers and sailors in the theater of war sent back home, many of which have excellent content and battle descriptions, some of which have been transcribed, some carried by Navy ships to New Orleans and others with transit postmarks of Brazos or Port Isabel, seven covers with Vera Cruz provisional military postmarks and a few to soldiers in Mexico, also an 1841 Winfield Scott free frank as Major General, a few usual faults but generally fine-very fine. Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $4,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
THE SANTA FE TRAIL
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
374   Commerce of the Prairies or the Journal of a Santa Fe Trader., Josiah Gregg. New York, Henry G. Langley, 1844. Volume II only of two volumes. 12mo, green cloth with gilt
illustration, spine. Risvold label on pastedown. Foxed extremities, cracCommerce of the Prairies or the Journal of a Santa Fe Trader., Josiah Gregg. New York, Henry G. Langley, 1844. Volume II only of two volumes. 12mo, green cloth with gilt illustration, spine. Risvold label on pastedown. Foxed extremities, cracked hinge. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $450.00
Will close during Public Auction
375   [Santa Fe Trail] Two desirable Books: Wah-to-Yah & the Taos Trail... HL Garrard. Cincinnati, HW Derby, 1850. 12mo, original cloth with gilt spine. Bookplate and Risvold label on pastedown. Rubbed ends and corners, with minor chipping of spine ends, staining of page edges. Snake-Dance of the Moquis of Arizona. JG Bourke. London, Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington, 1884. 8vo, original green cloth with gilt and black illustrations and spine. With 31 plates, several in color. Rebacked. Risvold label on pastedown. Exterior rubbed and scuffed, some minor foxing and offsetting within. Est. $200-300

SOLD for $575.00
Will close during Public Auction
376   [New Mexico Broadside] Important Broadside 15.75 x 10.65, Santa Fe, February 15, 1847, Government Printing Office, announcing (Army of the West)  Massacre of Gov. Bent and
Other Americans at Taos!  Battles of Canada, El Emboda, Taos, and Mor[New Mexico Broadside] Important Broadside 15.75" x 10.65", Santa Fe, February 15, 1847, Government Printing Office, announcing "(Army of the West) / Massacre of Gov. Bent and Other Americans at Taos! / Battles of Canada, El Emboda, Taos, and Moro!! / AMERICANS VICTORIOUS." And giving full details in three columns below. With pen notes at top and on verso (showing through). In exceptional condition. Governor Charles Bent had been murdered and scalped in his home in Taos on January 19. Col. Sterling Price, commanding the territory, soon moved on the town and the revolt was crushed. Probably the most impressive victory was at Canada, where Price and fewer than 400 soldiers defeated a force of 1500. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $22,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
377   [Santa Fe Fur Trade] Early autograph letter signed, St. Louis, November 28, 1824, by I.C. McGirk. He writes Andrew Scott in Dandridge, Tennessee, Our Missouri fur trade is
antensive & profitable. Prosperity & wealth awaits us & is the sure rew[Santa Fe Fur Trade] Early autograph letter signed, St. Louis, November 28, 1824, by I.C. McGirk. He writes Andrew Scott in Dandridge, Tennessee, "Our Missouri fur trade is antensive & profitable. Prosperity & wealth awaits us & is the sure reward of industry & economy. Our Tobaco sells as high in Liverpool...as James River Tobaco...Our trade with the Mexican provinces is considerable. Our young men take pack horses & dearborn waggons loaded with merchandise, go every year 1100 miles across the praries to Santa Fe to trade for mules & specie, & return the same year and generally double their money. These are hardy dogs, who fear no rains nor Storms nor Indians."The Santa Fe fur trade took off earlier than the trade in the Northwest primarily due to the region's earlier settlement by the Spanish and Mexicans and the relative ease of reaching the area by traveling overland. However, its continuing to be part of Mexican territory (until the Mexican War in 1846-47) placed political and economic constraints where there were fewer geographical ones. (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $325.00
Will close during Public Auction
378   [Doniphans Expedition] Choice content autograph letter signed by William S. Hayten, July 15, 1846, from Pawnee Fork (near present-day Larned, Kansas) on the Santa Fe Trail, one
of the Missouri volunteers that made up William Doniphans expeditio[Doniphan's Expedition] Choice content autograph letter signed by William S. Hayten, July 15, 1846, from Pawnee Fork (near present-day Larned, Kansas) on the Santa Fe Trail, one of the Missouri volunteers that made up William Doniphan's expedition into New Mexico. He writes his brother and sister in Liberty, Missouri, about a body he had to fish out of the river: "I tell you I felt Mity Quire when I Caught Hold of him - his head & feet was hid in the water. His Sholders was out. Poor fellow he was sent with an Express from the Garrison (Ft. Leavenworth) to the Comisary Wagons here on Paughnee Fork. His name was Hughes, a Vol. in Capt. Hudson Company from St. Louis...There is Some in every company 2 or 3 that is sick...A Man can see something New to him any Day - some of them Interesting & Some Verry Horrible. I guess it Horned Frog or Prairie Dog or a hurd of Buffalows 2 or 3 hundred & Dozens of thing I havent time to mention...We are water Bound at presant But will Be off Soon as the River is falling fast. It is now to Bents Fort about 250 miles from heare & from Bents Fort to Santa Fee 250 miles."He adds the next day: "Col. Carney (S.W. Kearny) has Just came up with five company." The expedition would reach Santa Fe and continue south on the Camino Real to Mexico, where it won the Battle of Sacramento, instrumental in gaining New Mexico for the United States when the Mexican-American War ended. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,800.00
Will close during Public Auction
379 c   Encampment of Army of the West near Bents Fort Arkansas, July 31st, 1846, dateline (present day Colorado) on folded letter with integral address leaf to General Gibson at
Washington, D.C., endorsed On Public Service and carried by military expEncampment of Army of the West near Bent's Fort Arkansas, July 31st, 1846, dateline (present day Colorado) on folded letter with integral address leaf to General Gibson at Washington, D.C., endorsed "On Public Service" and carried by military express up the Santa Fe Trail to Fort Leavenworth, where it entered the mails with "Fort Leavenworth, Mo./Aug 31" datestamp and manuscript "10" rate, exactly 30 days after it left Bent's Fort, file fold through postmark, fresh and very fine.The letter, from Lt. W.N. Grier, a member of the 1st Dragoons who escorted Kearny when he left from Fort Leavenworth on 30 June, 1846, reports that "On the march, the wagon containing my baggage was overturned in fording a creek - my public accounts were damaged." He hopes to send them in when they get to Santa Fe, where they arrived on 18th August, the same day Kearny took possession of New Mexico for the United States. (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $6,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
380 c   [On the Santa Fe Trail] three folded letters with integral address leaves comprised letter written at Santa Fe August 30th, (1846) carried up the Santa Fe trail by military express entering the mails with "Independence, Mo/Oct 5" datestamp and manuscript "5" rate to Lexington, Missouri, letter written at Santa Fe Sept. 4th 1846 from the same correspondence carried up the trail and entering the mails with "Independence, Mo./Oct 5" datestamp, undated (March 1848) letter carried up the trail and entering the mails to St. Clair, Illinois with "Fort Leavenworth, Mo./Mar 21" datestamp and manuscript "10" rate changed to "20" with "News has arrived here almost every day for the last two weeks to the effect that Santa Anna with a force of from six to ten thousand strong is advancing against the territory...", also includes two letters without covers, one datelined "Fort Defiance, New Mexico, October 27th, 1859 and the other "Santa Fe, New Mexico, Sept 5th, 1864, all with interesting contents, very fine. Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $2,900.00
Will close during Public Auction

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