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EXPLORATION AND WAR continued...

THE INDIAN WARS continued...
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
261 BK   [Assiniboins] Aquatint Engraving Magic Pile Erected by the Assiniboin Indians C. Bodmer, painter, Bougeard, publisher, C. Vogel, engraver. Holscher in Koblenz, Ackermann in
London, Bertrand in Paris, (ca 1840). Embossed C. Bodmer at bottom. V[Assiniboins] Aquatint Engraving "Magic Pile Erected by the Assiniboin Indians" C. Bodmer, painter, Bougeard, publisher, C. Vogel, engraver. Holscher in Koblenz, Ackermann in London, Bertrand in Paris, (ca 1840). Embossed "C. Bodmer" at bottom. Vignette XV from Maximilian of Wied's Travels in the Interior of North America. 11.5" x 15.75". Foxing in blank margins. Matted, with minor dampstaining to bottom of mat. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $375.00
Will close during Public Auction
262   [Crows] Aquatint Engraving Crow Indians C. Bodmer, painter, Bougeard, publisher, Hurlimann, engraver. Holscher in Koblenz, Ackermann in London, Bertrand in Paris, 1840.
Embossed C. Bodmer at bottom. Vignette XIII from Maximilian of Wieds Tra[Crows] Aquatint Engraving "Crow Indians" C. Bodmer, painter, Bougeard, publisher, Hurlimann, engraver. Holscher in Koblenz, Ackermann in London, Bertrand in Paris, 1840. Embossed "C. Bodmer" at bottom. Vignette XIII from Maximilian of Wied's Travels in the Interior of North America. 11.5" x 15.75". Very light foxing. Matted. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $525.00
Will close during Public Auction
263   [Mandans] Two Engravings Dance of the Mandan Indians and Dog-sledges of the Mandan Indians c. Bodmer, painter, Bougeard, publisher, former Desmadryl and latter Laderer &
Hurlimann engravers. Holscher in Koblenz, Ackermann in London, Bertrand[Mandans] Two Engravings "Dance of the Mandan Indians" and "Dog-sledges of the Mandan Indians" c. Bodmer, painter, Bougeard, publisher, former Desmadryl and latter Laderer & Hurlimann engravers. Holscher in Koblenz, Ackermann in London, Bertrand in Paris, [ca 1839-43]. Embossed "C. Bodmer" at bottom. Vignette XXV and XXIX from Maximilian of Wied's Travels in the Interior of North America, each 11.5" x 15.75", latter matted. (imagea) (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $575.00
Will close during Public Auction
264   [Piekanns] Rare aquatint Engraving Encampment of the Piekann Indians C. Bodmer, painter, Bougeard, publisher, Beyer & Hurlimann, engraver. Holscher in Koblenz, Ackermann in
London, Bertrand in Paris, [ca 1840]. Embossed C. Bodmer at bottom. T[Piekanns] Rare aquatint Engraving "Encampment of the Piekann Indians" C. Bodmer, painter, Bougeard, publisher, Beyer & Hurlimann, engraver. Holscher in Koblenz, Ackermann in London, Bertrand in Paris, [ca 1840]. Embossed "C. Bodmer" at bottom. Tableau 43. 17.25" x 23.75". Matted. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $1,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
265   [Punka Indians] Aquatint Engraving Punka Indians Encamped on the Banks of the Missouri c. Bodmer, painter, Bougeard, publisher, Salathe, engraver. Holscher in Koblenz,
Ackermann in London, Bertrand in Paris, [1843]. Embossed C. Bodmer at bott[Punka Indians] Aquatint Engraving "Punka Indians Encamped on the Banks of the Missouri" c. Bodmer, painter, Bougeard, publisher, Salathe, engraver. Holscher in Koblenz, Ackermann in London, Bertrand in Paris, [1843]. Embossed "C. Bodmer" at bottom. Vignette XI from Maximilian of Wied's Travels in the Interior of North America. 11.5" x 15.75". Some foxing and bumping of blank margins, matting traces at top. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $425.00
Will close during Public Auction
266   [Books, Native Americans] History of the Indian Tribes of North America. TL McKenny & J Hall. Philadelphia, D. Rice & AN Hart, 1854. Three volumes. 8vo, modern binding with red morocco, gilt cover design and spines, gilt edges. With 120 hand-colored images. Risvold labels on pastedowns. Volume III frontis detached but present. Minor interior soiling, cracked hinges. With Upper Mississippi; or Historical Sketches of the Mound Builders... G. Gale. Chicago, Clarke and Co., 1867. 12mo, brown cloth with gilt spine. Inscribed by Gale on front endpaper, partly obscured by Risvold label. With portrait and fourteen plates. Damage to front endpapers. Life Among the Apaches. JC Cremony. San Francisco, A. Roman & Co., 1868. 12mo, green cloth with gilt spine. Risvold label on pastedown. Some shaking and cracking at front hinge. Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars 1861-1865. St. Paul, Pioneer Press, 1891. Stated second edition. Est. $500-750

SOLD for $4,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
267   [Lithograph, Execution of Thrity-eight Sioux Indians at Mankato, Minnesota December 26, 1862.] John C. Wise, publisher, 1883 Hayes Litho. Co., Buffalo, NY. Chromolithograph on
paper, 16.5 x 21.25. Chipping of bottom margin, soft crease at up[Lithograph, "Execution of Thrity-eight Sioux Indians at Mankato, Minnesota December 26, 1862."] John C. Wise, publisher, 1883; Hayes Litho. Co., Buffalo, NY. Chromolithograph on paper, 16.5" x 21.25". Chipping of bottom margin, soft crease at upper right. With mat. These executions were in response to the Dakota Uprising (aka the Sioux War), and remain the largest mass execution in US history. Though some have used the incident to impute bloodthirstiness on the part of President Abraham Lincoln, originally 303 of the Dakotas were scheduled to die. He commuted the sentences of all but the worst offenders. (Image) Est. $200-300

SOLD for $650.00
Will close during Public Auction
268   [Rain-in-the-Face] Cabinet card Photograph of Chief Rain-in-the-Face, by D. Barry, Bismarck, Dakota, 1886. Toned, with minor edge wear and a few small scratches, but in
beautiful condition.[Rain-in-the-Face] Cabinet card Photograph of Chief Rain-in-the-Face, by D. Barry, Bismarck, "Dakota", 1886. Toned, with minor edge wear and a few small scratches, but in beautiful condition. (Image) Est. $300-400

SOLD for $1,050.00
Will close during Public Auction
269   [Fort Alexandria] Outstanding hand-drawn Map of the fort, 10 x 14.5, by BW Brinson & EN Darling of the 8th Regiment, Mn Volunteers, 1863. Some foxing.[Fort Alexandria] Outstanding hand-drawn Map of the fort, 10" x 14.5", by BW Brinson & EN Darling of the 8th Regiment, Mn Volunteers, 1863. Some foxing. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $2,100.00
Will close during Public Auction
270   [Native Americans] Outstanding group of late 19th and early 20th century items concerning Native Americans. Includes autographs of J.W. Captain Jack Crawford, Philip Robert
Parson Bob Landon, photographer Bennett Fiske, and on one postal cove[Native Americans] Outstanding group of late 19th and early 20th century items concerning Native Americans. Includes autographs of J.W. "Captain Jack" Crawford, Philip Robert "Parson Bob" Landon, photographer Bennett Fiske, and on one postal cover, "G.W. "Pawnee Bill" Lillie, Kit Carson III, Richard "Diamond Dick" Tanner, and others; photographs (mostly originals, but also with some period postcards and reproductions) of infamous chiefs or showmen; likewise of famed "Indian fighters"; typed reminiscences and articles; and a number of manuscript accounts from the old Indian fighters of their exploits, mostly L.H. North. (Image) Est. $500-750

SOLD for $1,150.00
Will close during Public Auction
271   [Books, Sioux War] Includes: History of the Sioux War and Massacres of 1862 and 1863. Isaac VD Heard. NY, Harper & Brothers, 1863. 12mo original cloth with gilt spine. Risvold label on pastedown. Shaken. External soiling and wear, A Thrilling Narrative of the Minnesota Massacre and the Sioux War of 1862-63. AP Connolly. Chicago, AP Connolly, (1896). 8vo, later ¼ morocco with banded and gilt spine. Risvold label on front pastedown. The Story of my Capture and Escape During the Minnesota Indian Massacre... Helen M. Tarble. St. Paul, Abbott Printing, 1904. Printed green wraps. Staple bound. Interior corner loss to front wrap, tear in rear.With Dakota Tawaxitku Kin, or the Dakota Friend. Vol II, No. 7. St. Paul, 1852; Message from the President Communicating the Report of an Investigation of Fraud and Misconduct Alleged Against Alexander Ramsey, Supt. Of Indian Affairs in Minnesota. Franklin Pierce et al. Washington, 1854. First Edition. 8vo, half calf with marbled boards. Boards well rubbed with some exposure at corners, owner pen note on pastedown, light dampstaining, foxing of extremities. Est. $400-500

SOLD for $375.00
Will close during Public Auction
272   [Books, Sioux] Choice group of Books: The Aborigines of Minnesota. NH Winchell. St. Paul, the Pioneer Company, 1911. 4to, half brown morocco with black cloth, gilt cover design and spine. With photographic illustrations and fold-out maps. Exterior lightly worn and soiled, but interior exceptional. Life of Sitting Bull and the History of the Indian War of 1890-91. WF Johnson. Edgewood Publishing, 1891. Illustrated green cloth. Profusely Illustrated. Indian Outbreaks. D. Buck. Mankato, MN, Pioneer Press, 1904. 8vo, orange cloth. Gift inscription. Exterior soiled and lightly rubbed, interior clean. The Eleanor H. Hinman Interviews on the Life and Death of Crazy Horse. No place, Gary Owen Press, (1976). 4to, quarter cloth. One of 100. Nearly as-new. Est. $400-500

SOLD for $260.00
Will close during Public Auction
273   [Books, Native Americans] Choice group of Books: North American Indians. George Catlin. Philadelphia, Leary, Stuart & Co., 1913. Two volumes. 8vo, red cloth with black and gilt illustrated wraps and spines. Library designations in ink on spines. Bookplates removed from pastedowns with minor damage. Title pages clipped at top. Risvold labels on pastedowns. Volume I fold-out map a bit worn at edges. Our Wild Indians: Thirty-Three Years' Personal Experience... Richard Irving Dodge. Hartford, AD Worthington, 1882. 8vo, orig half morocco with marbled boards. scuffed, edges rubbed - With frontis & 24 plates. Boards well scuffed and bumped, offsetting from frontispiece, overall internal toning. Life with the Esquimeaux. CF Hall. London, Sampson, Low, Son and Marston, 1865. "Popular Edition," 8vo, red cloth with gilt title, spine, and cover illustrations. Illustrated, with folded map in rear pouch. Front hinge repaired. Cover rubbed, edges toned and lightly soiled, some interior foxing. Message from the President Transmitting a Communication from the Secretary of the Interior Relative to the Chippewa Indians in Minnesota. B. Harrison. Washington, Govt. Printing Office, 1890. In contemporary leather with gilt title on front cover Negotiations with the Chippewa Indians of Minnesota / Approved by the President / March 4th, 1890 with names of the commissioners. My Life and Experiences Among Our Hostile Indians. OO Howard. Hartford, AD Worthington & Co., (1907). 8vo, blue cloth with gilt facsimile signature, spine. Early cracking to front hinge. Massacres of the Mountains: A History of the Indian Wars of the Far West. JP Dunn. NY, Harper & Brothers, 1886. 8vo, original illustrated cloth with gilt panel, title, and spine. Fold-out map, numerous illustrations. Est. $500-750

SOLD for $800.00
Will close during Public Auction
274   [The Prophet and Tecumseh, William H. Harrison] Four important Letters Signed by Harrison as governor of the Indiana Territory, 1808-1810, on Native American hostilities that
would climax in Tecumsehs War. All are written from Vincennes, the ter[The Prophet and Tecumseh, William H. Harrison] Four important Letters Signed by Harrison as governor of the Indiana Territory, 1808-1810, on Native American hostilities that would climax in Tecumseh's War. All are written from Vincennes, the territorial capital. The first, to Secretary of War Henry Dearborn in May 1808, informs him that: "The Shawnee imposter" generally known as the Prophet has "acquired such an ascendency over the minds of the Indians that there can be little doubt of their pursuing any course which he may dictate to them, and that his views are decidedly hostile to the United States is but too evident. The Prophet had selected a spot on the upper part of the Wabash for his residence and had engaged a considerable number of Potawatimies Ottawas Chippawas and other northern Indians to settle there under his auspices. This circumstance so alarmed the (American-friendly) Miamis & Delawares that they resolved to defeat the measure at any risk and the Chiefs of the latter set out to inform him of their determination. The Prophet would not however deign them an interview but dispatched his brother (Tecumseh) to meet them, whose threats or whose persuasions were sufficient to drive back the Chiefs. I have lately conversed with an intelligent man who passed through some of the villages of the Potawatimies that are under the Prophets influence. He says that they are constantly engaged in what they term religious duties. But that their prayers are always succeeded by or intermixed with warlike sports, shooting with the bow, throwing the Tomhawk or wielding the war club. I most sincerely wish the President would think himself authorized to have him seized and conveyed to the interior of the United States until the present appearance of war is removed."A year later, he writes the new secretary of war (William Eustis) that reliable reports indicate "that the Prophet and his followers had determined to commence hostilities to 'sweep all the white people from the Wabash and white River' after which they intended to attack the Miamis." Harrison's informant "thinks there is no real understanding between the Prophet and the Ottawas and Chippewas. About eight days ago he had with him three hundred and fifty warriors well armed with Rifles and tolerably supplied with ammunition. … The Prophet cannot keep the number of men which he now has embodied any length of time; as soon as they disperse I shall dismiss the two Companies."In April of 1810 he writes to Eustis: "The Showonoe Prophet is again exciting the Indians to Hostilities against the United States...He has at least 1000 souls under his immediate control principally composed of Kickapoos & Winebagos but with a considerable number of Potawatimies & Shawanoes & a few Chippewas and Ottowas. The friends of the French Traders amongst the Indians have advised them to separate themselves from the Americans in this town. I have no doubt that the present hostile disposition has been produced by British interference. It is certain that they have rec'd a considerable supply of ammunition from that source...There are not more than a full Company of American Militia in the Town, & the French for any military purpose are worth nothing. ..." He then recommends that a fort be built on the Wabash to help protect the region. That July 11, he reaffirms his opinion, explaining that a week earlier "four canoes passed the Wea Village of Terre Hoite (sic) … I dispatched a Lieut. of Militia and eight men to see what had become of them. .. they had left their canoe there and had gone to the meeting of the Shakers on Sunday." On their return trip, they quickly scuttled the canoe and "stole five horses. Those fellows were all completely armed had no skins to trade with …. I have forbad their pursuit of the thieves because I know it will produce blood shed. … I am convinced that the pursuit was desired by the Indians & that a larger party was lying in ambush. As long however as no Blood is spilt I shall have hopes of bringing the Prophet to reason. But our people will not suffer their property to be taken & I daily expect to hear of some Indians being killed in an attempt to take off horses. I fear that some of the friendly Indians will suffer from the crimes of others. I have no other expectation than that of seeing all the Tribes united against us in six months after hostilities shall have commenced."All letters with some fold and edge wear, with some splitting, most notably this last letter, which is separated at hinge and at bottom fold, with repairs and reinforcement using Japanese paper strips. That letter is in good condition; the others are much better.Just a month after this last letter, Tecumseh and 1000 warriors came to Vincennes to repudiate the 1809 Treaty of Fort Wayne. Harrison refused to abrogate the treaty, and Tecumseh began inciting his men to attack Harrison's smaller force. While Tecumseh was away, Harrison led a force to Tippecanoe, the Prophet's village. Though the Prophet offered a parley, he instead attacked the army's camp. His forces were repulsed, and he abandoned the village. The battle marked the end of the Prophet's significance, though Tecumseh continued to lead his people in resisting American encroachment throughout the War of 1812. As Harrison's suspicions show, difficulties between the United States and its Native American neighbors were believed to be encouraged by the English and Canadians, a belief that would help lead to the coming war. (imagea) (imageb) (imaged) (Image) Est. $10,000-15,000

SOLD for $14,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
275   [First Seminole War, The Fall of Pensacola] Historic Autograph Letter Signed by Geo. M. Brooke, 1   pages, 4to, Pensacola, June 1, 1818. He writes to a Mr. Nivison, After a
most tedious and fatiguing march of twenty days through the wilderne[First Seminole War, The Fall of Pensacola] Historic Autograph Letter Signed by "Geo. M. Brooke," 1 pages, 4to, Pensacola, June 1, 1818. He writes to a Mr. Nivison, "After a most tedious and fatiguing march of twenty days through the wilderness, from the Appalachicola we arrived at this place, which we entered, without resistance notwithstanding the repeated declarations of the Spanish officers that we should be fired upon...The Governor had retired to the Barrancas, a strong work, commanding the entrance of the Bay of Pensacola, with about 300 troops, determined to defend it...On the 25th ultimo we set down before his work, and...erected a battery...A severe canonading commenced at sun rise, lasted that day and part of the next, when he thought proper to capitulate...We had a few killed and wounded, the enemy many more. Genl. Jackson with his volunteer(rs se)t out for Tennessee, the day before yesterday, leaving the regular troops...The whole of the Floridas, with the exception of St. Augustine, has been ceded to the American Forces, subject to the decisi(on) of the President...I trust they will never be returned, as in the present situation of Spain, she is entirely unable, to restrain, or keep in check her own Indians, who who treated the Spanish inhabitants, as their slaves, killing their cattle, and destroying their property as they pleased. I am now the Civil and Military Governor of West Florida, with as much trouble upon my hands, as any fellow ever had. …." Condition problems exist, namely some dark staining at left and right edges, with some acid wear along top fold creating an unobtrusive hole. Pieces out at right affect five lines of text. However, the extraordinary historical value of this letter well overcomes such defects. The Spanish were not directly involved in the Seminole War, and Jackson's willingness to attack their forts in West Florida earned him the ire of Secretary of War John C. Calhoun. Within eight months, a treaty was hammered out in which Spain ceded West and East Florida to the United States. Jackson had captured Pensacola before, during the War of 1812, but was obliged to return it to Spanish control in the Treaty of Ghent. (imagea) (Image) Est. $1,000-1,500

SOLD for $1,300.00
Will close during Public Auction
276   [Prairie du Chien, Nicolas Boilvin] Quite unusual pair of letters signed, one (autograph) in French and the other (manuscript) in English, both by the US Indian Agent at
Prairie du Chien, Illinois Territory (now Wisconsin), both on June 1, 1818.[Prairie du Chien, Nicolas Boilvin] Quite unusual pair of letters signed, one (autograph) in French and the other (manuscript) in English, both by the US Indian Agent at Prairie du Chien, Illinois Territory (now Wisconsin), both on June 1, 1818. With a single cover bearing an straight-line St. Louis postmark with indistinct date. In the first, he writes to Secretary of War John C. Calhoun in Washington about his arrival and having found the Governor (Joseph Phillips) absent from Kaskaskia, and of unspecified difficulty with the Indian Factor. So far he has not had to pay out any gifts. However, he adds a bit ominously, "I have been accustomed to manage all these tribes without difficulty but now they cannot be kept quiet although there is such an unnecessary number of agents. All the tribes are friendly and disposed to be peaceable if Government protects them." With contemporary manuscript copy in English, probably by a War Department employee. The other letter is more informative: "The operations of the Indian Factory at this place has been productive of much inconvenience, and discontent to the Indians and citizens. The Factor is in the habit of...disposing of a portion of his goods to a trader at the usual per centage say sixty one & a half - with this he visits the Indian settlements and retails at the rate of one or two and it is said sometimes three hundred per cent. The citizens of this place has no other way of supporting their families but by trading and now they are not permitted...for as soon as an agent attempts to grant them a license...the Indian Factor reports them officially as disaffected persons to the government, and consequently the agent is not justified in giving the citizen permission..." We can see from Boilvin's letter that he truly sought to serve the interests of both settlers and Native Americans. The US military commander at Prairie du Chien at the time was Col. Talbot Chambers, so corrupt and sadistic that he would soon be removed from his post and discharged from the service. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $800.00
Will close during Public Auction
277   [Black Hawk War, Ft. Armstrong] Interesting letter by Maj. Morrill Marston, commander of Fort Armstrong, Illinois, to Sabrina Marston in Hampton, NH, September 25, 1820. My
situation here...was rather unpleasant last spring, in consequence of[Black Hawk War, Ft. Armstrong] Interesting letter by Maj. Morrill Marston, commander of Fort Armstrong, Illinois, to Sabrina Marston in Hampton, NH, September 25, 1820. "My situation here...was rather unpleasant last spring, in consequence of the hostility of the Winebagoe Indians. Two of my men were shot & scalped by them a short distance from the fort; they passed out of the garrison with an axe for the purpose of cutting a gun rod & probably did not discover the Indians until they were fired upon. The murderers have been delivered up by the chiefs of their nation, and are now well ironed & in close confinement at this place. The only cause they assign for their conduct is, that some of their people were killed by the whites several years since...The (Sac and Fox) Indians in the vicinity of the garrison have always been friendly. It is only the Winebagoes who reside a considerable distance from this place that I have ever had any trouble with, & these Indians at present appear to be disposed to conduct themselves in a friendly manner." Seal hole and fold wear repaired with translucent paper. Though Maj. Marston reports no difficulties with the local tribes, the great war chief Black Hawk had been born on the very island where Ft. Armstrong stood. It would be at the same place that he signed the treaty ending the Black Hawk War, and ceding much of his people's land to white settlers. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $850.00
Will close during Public Auction
278   [Winnebago War] Historic early letter, Ouisconsins Portage, Michigan Territory, September 4, 1827. With manuscript postmark Green Bay M.T.  Sept. 23 and 25-cent rate. John H.
Kinzie, Indian agent, writes to EA Brush in Detroit that Yester[Winnebago War] Historic early letter, "Ouisconsins Portage," Michigan Territory, September 4, 1827. With manuscript postmark "Green Bay M.T. / Sept. 23" and 25-cent rate. John H. Kinzie, Indian agent, writes to EA Brush in Detroit that "Yesterday about noon we had the pleasure of seeing Mr. the Red bird & associate (the Sun) accompanied with about 116 men of their nation, coming to deliver themselves up to Maj. Whistler...He (Red Bird) was certainly the best looking Indian in the nation. He was dressed in Sioux dress of white leather, had a piece of square scarlet cloth over his brest & an ornamental pipe stem with feathers & painted green etc...The Winnebagos gave to the commanding officer 9 horses so that he might not ill treat the prisoners...Genl. Atkinson...is on his way up the Ouisconsin 60 miles, with 13 companies...The nation is alarmed much."The so-called Winnebago War began when Red Bird and some of his followers, in response to false reports that two of their men in US custody had been killed, attacked settlers at Prairie du Chien, killing two and partially scalping a little girl. American troops were mobilized, but rather than risk an open engagement, Red Bird surrendered himself to authorities. He would die in jail the following year. The unrest raised tensions that would lead directly to the Black Hawk War five years later. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $850.00
Will close during Public Auction
279   [Winnebagoes, Biddle, Thomas] Autograph letter signed to Genl. Joseph Street, St. Louis, June 27, 1828. Biddle writes, The Commissioners appointed under the last Act of
Congress to treat with the Winnebagoes &c are Col: P Menard & Gov. Cass. I[Winnebagoes, Biddle, Thomas] Autograph letter signed to Genl. Joseph Street, St. Louis, June 27, 1828. Biddle writes, "The Commissioners appointed under the last Act of Congress to treat with the Winnebagoes &c are Col: P Menard & Gov. Cass. I called immediately upon Col.Menard who was here and stated your willingness to act as secretary to the Commissioners...He promised to exert himself to obtain the appointment." He suggests that Street write to Cass on the matter, as he does not know him. "Mr. Langham is my agent at Fort Snelling & at Prairie des Chiens. The article of seal skin caps is here, but I feel apprehensive about getting those of a proper size."Biddle, Thomas - American soldier and merchant (1790-1831); gained renown during the War of 1812, fighting with distinction at Fort George, Stony Creek, Fort Erie, and Lundy's Lane; in response to a speech in 1830 by Congressman Spencer Pettis that criticized his brother, Nicholas - president of the Bank of the United States - Biddle attacked Pettis and beat him severely; in a duel they fought in 1831, both were mortally wounded. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $325.00
Will close during Public Auction
280   Rolette, (Jean) Joseph, Trying to prevent a war between the Sioux and the Sauks and Foxes, Outstanding autograph letter signed twice, from Prairie du Chien, Michigan Territory
(now Wisconsin), June 6, 1829. With straight-line Galena, IL postmark,Rolette, (Jean) Joseph, Trying to prevent a war between the Sioux and the Sauks and Foxes, Outstanding autograph letter signed twice, from Prairie du Chien, Michigan Territory (now Wisconsin), June 6, 1829. With straight-line Galena, IL postmark, June 8, and 18-3/4 rate. Rollete writes Pierre Chouteau Jr. of the American Fur Company:"to request you to try to get Governor (William) Clark to send in River des Moins and on a place called La Tourche aux Chats to try to stop the Sioux from going to War in retaliation ageinst the Saucs & Foxes - otherwise this outfit & that of the Saucs will suffer much more next season...The blow struck by the Foxes has injured this outfit of $20,000, and am afraid I will not be able to Save myself..." He encloses two drafts (not present), one for Indian agent J.M. Street, and one for Ramsay Crooks, for a wagon. Commissioners were dispatched and arrived a month later. A treaty was signed, but by 1830, a Sioux chief and his family were killed by a group of Sauks and Foxes. Governor Clark attempted to establish peace once again in 1831, but a Sauk and Fox war party massacred a party of Menomonees. These troubles culminated in the Black Hawk War of 1832.Rolette, Joseph - Canadian American fur trader (1781-1842); traded for the Mackinac Company, establishing a post at Prairie du Chien; became a partner when it was reorganized as the South West Company; sold out to the American Fur Company in 1815 and became their agent. (imagea) (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $3,500.00
Will close during Public Auction

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