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EXPLORATION AND WAR

THE COLONIAL PERIOD
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
1   Bucaniers of America, Alexandre O. Exquemelin. London, William Crooke, 1684. Four volumes in one. 4to, near-contemporary calf with banded and gilt spine. Eight plates, map, and
frontis. Owners note, 1685, on verso of frontis. Front hinge craBucaniers of America, Alexandre O. Exquemelin. London, William Crooke, 1684. Four volumes in one. 4to, near-contemporary calf with banded and gilt spine. Eight plates, map, and frontis. Owner's note, 1685, on verso of frontis. Front hinge cracked with partial separation of front board, covers well rubbed and soiled, interior with usual toning, but tight and clean. (photo - page x) (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $4,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
2   The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe., Daniel Defoe. London, John Stockdale, 1790. First Stothard edition. Two volumes. 8vo, contemporary leather with
later gilt spines. Rebacked. Engraved frontises and titles. Ex libThe Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe., Daniel Defoe. London, John Stockdale, 1790. First Stothard edition. Two volumes. 8vo, contemporary leather with later gilt spines. Rebacked. Engraved frontises and titles. Ex libris label and Risvold label on pastedowns, with bookseller's catalog tipped to pastedown of volume I. Some very light dampstaining, foxing, and offsetting, otherwise a choice condition copy. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $300.00
Will close during Public Auction
3   Military Antiquities Respecting a History of the English Army., Francis Grose. London, T. Egerton, 1801. Two volumes. 4to, later calf with banded and gilt spine. With 3 engraved
titles & 142 plates. Rebacked. William Markham bookplates on pasMilitary Antiquities Respecting a History of the English Army., Francis Grose. London, T. Egerton, 1801. Two volumes. 4to, later calf with banded and gilt spine. With 3 engraved titles & 142 plates. Rebacked. William Markham bookplates on pastedowns. Some marginal foxing and light offsetting from plates, but overall a beautiful copy, fine. (Image) Est. $400-500

SOLD for $300.00
Will close during Public Auction
4   A Voyage of Discovery to the North Pacific Ocean, and Round the World., George Vancouver. London, John Stockdale, 1801. Six volumes. 8vo, modern ¼ leather with banded and gilt
spines, gilt tops. With folding map and folding plates. BookplatesA Voyage of Discovery to the North Pacific Ocean, and Round the World., George Vancouver. London, John Stockdale, 1801. Six volumes. 8vo, modern ¼ leather with banded and gilt spines, gilt tops. With folding map and folding plates. Bookplates and Risvold labels on modern pastedowns. (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $2,800.00
Will close during Public Auction
5   [The Braddock Expedition, Extolling George Washington] Wonderful content letter of Henry Walker datelined Petersburg up Appamatox James River, Virginia, on August 3, 1755.
Addressed to his father at Whitehaven, England, endorsed p the How  Ca[The Braddock Expedition, Extolling George Washington] Wonderful content letter of Henry Walker datelined "Petersburg up Appamatox James River, Virginia," on August 3, 1755. Addressed to his father at Whitehaven, England, endorsed "p the How / Capt Eilbeck" and carried privately.Contents include: "On the 9th of last at Mongohala (Monongahela) within Six Miles of the French Fort (Duquesne) Gen. Braddock with 1300 chosen Men and officers were attacted by the French and Indeans supposed to be in number about 400 and after a Bloody action of Three & a half Hours our Troops yielded Ground. We lost all our provision Artiliary Stores and Baggage of every kind, and by much the greatest part of our Officers, our Famous General Braddock was shot thro the arm and Body Mounting his fifth Horse. The detatchment of light Horse that attended him out of Twenty Nine had Twenty five Killed.We are informed the French and Indians were not in number above 400 whose method of fiting were sticking on every side behind logs and busges and by aying a train of powder and setting it on fire our troops kept firing at the smoak till the were half killed and not knowing what they fired at and the Indians firing from every side drop's them like Bees.It is reported that Washington a Virginian who was our late Generall in our Expedition last year rode up to General Braddock and advised him to break his men and take the Indean Method of fiting behind the Bushes but he refused so by that means lost the Battle.Washington last year with three Hundred Men was attacted by Nine hundred and by his good noshons of there way, kill'd upwards of three Hundred of theirs with the loss of Seventy kill'd and wounded and when a parley was call'ed out for by the French he had the better of the Battle notwithstanding there numbers."With a fine modern printed image of Washington; minor edge faults, fine: ex-Siskin. (imagea) (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $19,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
6 c   [French and Indian War] Fort Cumberland (Nova Scotia), 18th July, 1758 dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf written during the French & Indian War and carried out
of the mails to Boston, addressed to Thomas Hancock, who was the un[French and Indian War] Fort Cumberland (Nova Scotia), 18th July, 1758 dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf written during the French & Indian War and carried out of the mails to Boston, addressed to Thomas Hancock, who was the uncle of the famous John Hancock of the American Revolutionary War and a wealthy merchant who was an agent for the British government, it was written by Demetrius James, Lt. Colonel of the 43rd regiment, who may have been commandant of the fort at the time, fresh and very fine.The letter reads: "Sir, This goes by Captain Noble, who I most sincerely wish may arrive safe at Boston; as we are Extremely anxious, as well on account of Mr. Huston & an officer of the 43rd Regimt. as his Own, about the Fate of Dogget (John, an officer) who sailed from hence about ten days & must have good luck if he has not fallen into ye Enemys hands since two men of the 43rd Regiment, two Rangers, one of Captain Dank's (Benoin) the other a Sargeant of Gorhams (Joseph, Lt. Col. Rangers) Company & one sailor belonging to Arbuckle who Escaped to us two days since from Mirimski, (New Brunswick) where they had been for Some time prisoners, informing us that there's a Privateer Crusing off Mount Desart yt has lately taken Grows and Winnits Sloops the first laden with Lime for this Garrison, the other Either bound for or returning from Annapolis Royal (Nova Scotia). I acquainted you by Dogget, who had my draught on you in his Own favour for £1050 of this currency on the province amount that Captain Danks with his Rangers had brought us in the 4th instant nine stout male prisoners alive, with one scalp from Petgnecheck (a location?), had drownd & destroyed as many more, taken 19 Stands of Arms and done the Enemy a great deal of Other damage. I at the Same time troubled you with some letters for my Friends in Europe, and others on his Majestys Service, which if they have been Lucky Enough to Escape this damnd privateer, I am persuaded you will be so good as to forward as usual. Lieut Meech with 30 Rangers in 3 Whale Boats went off this mornings tide for Piz(iquid, now Windsor, N.S.) from whence he is to proceed with all possible Expedition to Halifax (overland), to inform the Genel (Jeffery Amherst) of the Intelligence brought us by our people from Mirimiski: about 8 or so days hence-We expect his return with good news from Louisbourg. With this I send you two letters on his Majestys Service: one for Major Elliot (Robert) and the other for Lt. Dunbar. I shall be always Sensible of the favours you are so kind as to Confer on me & am Sir your Obliged and obedt humble Servt"Lt. Meech and the three whale boats sailed from Ft. Cumberland into the Bay of Fundy to Windsor, N.S., thence overland to Halifax. The "good news" they expected was the surrender of Louisbourg by the French to the British fleet eight days before this letter was written. Ft. Cumberland was located near Amherst, N.S. and Louisbourg was on Cape Breton Island. (imagea) (Image) Est. $2,000-3,000

SOLD for $4,750.00
Will close during Public Auction
7   [John Adams Writes from First Continental Congress] Adams, John - Breathtaking content Autograph Letter, unsigned, by John Adams, one page, 4to, Philadelphia, October 7, 1774.
While attending the First Continental Congress, Adams, apparently in r[John Adams Writes from First Continental Congress] Adams, John - Breathtaking content Autograph Letter, unsigned, by John Adams, one page, 4to, Philadelphia, October 7, 1774. While attending the First Continental Congress, Adams, apparently in response to a letter of encouragement from an Englishman, thanks him for his kindness, and gives his opinion that: "The wretched Vapouring of your Toris who are the worst Enemies of Mankind that ever disgraced the human Figure, Head and Heart, are ridiculous enough. They are laughed at by every man of sense here. Gent'n here know better the state of Britain and America. But I can tell them, for their Comfort, that Britain has neither Troops nor Money, to engage in a twenty years War with all north America. I am assured by several Gentlemen here perfectly acquainted with the british Army, that the whole seventy Regiments now in being do not amount to 27,000 Men. 12,000 of these must remain in Ireland. Some are in the West Indies. Some in Gibralter. Some in Minorca. Some in England and some in America. It is therefore certain they cannot with their present Army pretend to fight America at Land. To talk of Hanoverians and Hessians! Will the british Nation stripped of the Commerce of the Colonies, raise her Millions by new Taxes to pay Germans? The poor deluded, abandoned Toris in Boston know not their situation. They are pushing, with all their Malice, for Measures that if pursued will cost them very dear." (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $37,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
8   Lee, Richard Henry Outstanding patriotic content Autograph Letter Signed Richard Henry Lee, 3 pages, 4to, Chantilly, VA, July 17, 1782. To his fellow Signer, General William
Whipple, in New Hampshire, he laments a break in correspondence that mLee, Richard Henry Outstanding patriotic content Autograph Letter Signed "Richard Henry Lee," 3 pages, 4to, Chantilly, VA, July 17, 1782. To his fellow Signer, General William Whipple, in New Hampshire, he laments a break in correspondence that must have: "some other cause than neglect between two persons whose friendship is founded on virtue tried in severest times. For my part I must cease to live before I cease to love those proved patriots with whom I early toiled in the vineyard of American liberty." Nothing has prevented his writing "more so than the uncertainty of conveyance. It is disagreeable to write to a friend when the mind is cramped, and a free communication of sentiments prevented. Capt. Simpson safely contrived your letter to me with the very agreeable present of fish. We have indeed, as you observe, suffered our part of the calamities of war, and I wish it may furnish us with that best kind of improvement which is learnt in the school of adversity. You may see by the published resolve of our Assembly that the last arrived delusion at New York is not likely to make a greater impression here than the old ones had done. I fear that our enemies have not yet drank deep enough of the cup of misfortune to produce in their minds a serious desire of peace upon honorable and admissible terms. And no doubt the affair of the 12th of April in the W. Indies (in which the British Navy won an overwhelming victory over the French and captured Admiral de Grasse) will serve to foster that spirit of pride and domination which cannot fail to bring G. Britain low indeed. The capitulation of York has freed us from much oppression but we continue to be infested with private and strong barges that much injure our bay and river vessels and pester our whores extremely with night robberies and day surprises. These crews are made up of refugees, negroes, and such as fly from civil justice, who under the sanction of british commissions are warring upon women and children, stealing clothes & negroes, and committing every outrage. Thus the worst passions of human nature are let loose to thrive under the patronage of George the third, defender of the faith truly!"Lee goes on to describe a foiled attack by one of the pirate barges and in a postscript sends along some Virginia tobacco in gratitude for the fish. With Whipple's docket on address leaf. Repairs to closed tears with Japanese paper; seal hole affecting three lines near close. (Image) Est. $1,500-2,000

SOLD for $22,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
9   Adams, John Quincy Autograph Letter Signed Your friend, .Q., 3 pages, 4to, at the home of American merchant Joshua Johnson in London, November 17, 1783. Writing (via Benjamin
Franklin) to his friend Peter Munro, a nephew of John Jay who was stuAdams, John Quincy Autograph Letter Signed "Your friend, .Q.," 3 pages, 4to, at the home of American merchant Joshua Johnson in London, November 17, 1783. Writing (via Benjamin Franklin) to his friend Peter Munro, a nephew of John Jay who was studying at Passy, near Paris, he describes the capital's amusements: "On Wednesday evening I went to the Theatre Royal in Drury Lane, and saw the West Indian; with a Pantomime entertainment called Fortunatus. they equal at least the French in Comedy. The entertainment of Fortunatus, is a Harlequinade, like those performed on the small stages of Paris. On Thursday we went to the Royal Society and saw their Proceedings, but there was nothing read except a very dry, unphilosophical account, of the late earthquakes in Calabria. If we had been there the Thursday before, we should have read two letters from Dr: Franklin about the air balloons (recently demonstrated near Paris). They are in a puzzle to know whether the Dr: is in jest or in earnest, for in his Letters, he points out to them, of what prodigious advantage the air balloons may be to Great Britain; under such a virtuous administration, as the present one.On Friday I went to see Hughes's equestrian performances, which are by no means equal to those of Astley's. On Saturday, we went to the Covent Garden Theatre and saw represented the Tragedy of Douglas in which Mrs: Crawford appeared. This Mrs. Crawford was formerly very famous here; under the name of Barry; but about five years ago she left the Stage; but she has been persuaded by the Managers to come on again, to counteract Mrs: Siddons who is at Drury Lane. But whatever Mrs: Crawford may have been heretofore: she is not I think at present equal to her rival; who has many advantages, 1st: She is about 30 years old; and Mrs. Crawford is turn'd of fifty - 2dly: She has more striking features, and a figure more adapted to the Stage - 3dly, her voice is yet unimpair'd. After the Tragedy, we had a new Comic (O)pera in two Acts, called the poor Soldier, which is charming." (imagea) (Image) Est. $3,000-4,000

SOLD for $6,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
FLORIDA
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
10 c   PENSACOLA, largely clear straightline British Colonial handstamp on folded letter to St. Augustine, East Florida written by Robert Barrie, a civilian doctor attached to the
British army in St. Vincent, West Indies, datelined Camp at Grand Sable,PENSACOLA, largely clear straightline British Colonial handstamp on folded letter to St. Augustine, East Florida written by Robert Barrie, a civilian doctor attached to the British army in St. Vincent, West Indies, datelined "Camp at Grand Sable, 14th, December, 1772" and addressed to his wife at St. Augustine, where it arrived after a long and varied journey, probably carried by army boat from St. Vincent to Kingstown, Jamaica, where it entered the mails with "IAMAICA" straightline postmark and "Windward Islands" endorsement, and rated "In all d8" (4d to Pensacola, plus 4d from there to Charles Town), thence to Pensacola where it received a straightline "PENSACOLA" transit handstamp, then by ship to Charleston where it arrived with a "(CH)ARLES/(T)OWN" two-line straightline postmark and the "In all d8" was crossed out and replaced with "1N8" (1 shilling and 8 pence) and forwarded overland, the extra 1/- being for the final overland leg on the post road to St. Augustine, cover with some missing pieces added to the flaps, some internal splits and expertly silked for preservation, very fine and extraordinary usage, the only reported example of this combination of rare markings, llustrated in the Brakke and Robson Lowe Vol. 5; ex-Glassco.St. Vincent to Jamaica to Pensacola to Charles Town to St. Augustine seems like a very roundabout route, but the British mail packets did not stop at St. Augustine at the time. It should be noted that the sender wrote the "per the way of Carolina or Georgia" directive in the lower left corner of the cover. In the letter he writes: "Pilot is come to tell me the Boat is just going to sail, and the barrel that the letters are obliged to be put into headed up." This barrel containing the mails was towed out to the boat by the natives across the reefs and heavy surf.The British had acquired the Floridas, both East and West, from Spain by the Treaty of Paris in 1763 and then retroceeded them back to Spain by the Treaty of Versailles in 1783. (Image) Est. $30,000-40,000

SOLD for $100,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
11 c   St Augustine To Pay 1N (1-), clear manuscript postmark and rate on 12 Sept. 1774 folded letter to London datelined at the Mount Oswald Plantation and showing full bold strike of
rare CHARLESTOWN two-line straightline British Colonial transiSt Augustine To Pay 1N (1/-), clear manuscript postmark and rate on 12 Sept. 1774 folded letter to London datelined at the "Mount Oswald Plantation" and showing full bold strike of rare "CHARLES/TOWN" two-line straightline British Colonial transit postmark and "OC/10" Franklin type datestamp, beautifully struck "INLd & PACt/POSTAGE" handstamp and ms. "2N" rate (2/-), arrived in London with "5/DE" Bishop type datestamp, business contents discussing the sugar cane crop, cover incredibly fresh and clean, extremely fine cover and strikes; one of a mere three known examples from the British Colonial period in Florida bearing postal markings.In 1768, at the insistence of Governor Grant of Florida, a mail service was established between St. Augustine and Charleston, South Carolina, though the volume of mail was very small. The service was by post rider and ran from St. Augustine in British East Florida via Savannah and Sunbury to Charles Town, taking two weeks in each direction. Estimates of the frequency of the service range from once a month to twice a year. The little used service lasted only four or five years. (Image) Est. $7,500-10,000

SOLD for $40,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
12 c   FLORIDA, mostly clear red straightline Spanish Colonial handstamp on 1785 folded letter to Havana, Cuba, datelined San Augustin de la Florida 28 Jan 1785 and with senders
directive por primera via (by first wayavailable vessel), sent unpaidFLORIDA, mostly clear red straightline Spanish Colonial handstamp on 1785 folded letter to Havana, Cuba, datelined "San Augustin de la Florida 28 Jan 1785" and with sender's directive "por primera via (by first way/available vessel), sent unpaid and charged two silver reales upon arrival in Cuba, cover toned as expected and with a few minor worm holes on reverse, fine strike; ex-Kouri.Considered to be the greatest Florida cover in existence, beingboth the only known postmark from Spanish Florida, and the earliest reported town marking from any former Spanish colony in present day United States territory. In addition, this is the first time this cover has ever been offered publicly. Accompanied by a photocopy of a letter found in the Spanish archives dated 21 December, 1784 from the San Augustine postmaster, Manuel Fernandez-Bendicho, to his superiors in Havana, Cuba requesting a reimbursement for certain purchases made on two different dates of supplies, including a postmark device, used to establish a new post office. This substantiates that this handstamp was applied to this cover in Florida, not upon arrival in Cuba. (Image) Est. $20,000-30,000

SOLD for $29,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
13   [Spanish West Florida] Interesting historical content letter by David Bradford, Bayou Sarah (just west of the Mississippi, at the current inside elbow of Louisiana), West
Florida, July 1, 1805. With F-Adams July 12 postmark and 25 rate. David[Spanish West Florida] Interesting historical content letter by David Bradford, Bayou Sarah (just west of the Mississippi, at the current inside "elbow" of Louisiana), West Florida, July 1, 1805. With "F-Adams July 12" postmark and 25 rate. David Bardford, fugutive of the Whiskey Rebellion, writes to his friend David Redick, a lawyer in Washington, Pennsylvania. "We hae not here learnt one word respecting the result of Mr. Munroe's Embassy. Whether the Spaniards to give up peaceably & quiety as far East as the River Perdido which appears to me to be the point to which that Nation ought to concede without altercation under the terms of the treaty of St. Eldefondso. The words of the said treaty being 'And as was formerly held by the French'. It is established & known that the French held to that River formerly...Much chaff has been offered to the public; but the truth is...that the U.S. from their of France are entitled to claim & insist on a right as far as the Perdido. I presume Mr. Munroe has been instructed to purchase East Florida that the U.S. may...have no intervening Claims to obstruct Post Roads & other communications in the body of the U.S. In the strip where I live I see great inconveniences. True, the Post passes but it may be obstructed at any moment the Spanish Govt. may say...Should this take place all communication by land is cut off between the Seat of Govt. & New Orleans..." In excellent condition. The balance of the letter includes politics, personal business, and personal news.Bradford, David - One of the leaders of the Whiskey Rebellion in western Pennsylvania, Bradford escaped on a barge headed down the Ohio River; he resettled in Louisiana and became a prosperous planter; in 1801 President John Adams pardoned him. (imagea) (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $3,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
LOUISIANA
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
14 c   NUEVA  ORLEANS, red, circular Spanish Colonial Period handstamped postmark on 19th April, 1790 folded letter with integral address leaf to Bordeaux, France with manuscript 16
decimes due, carried to Spain by the Crowns Overseas Postal ServiceNUEVA / ORLEANS, red, circular Spanish Colonial Period handstamped postmark on 19th April, 1790 folded letter with integral address leaf to Bordeaux, France with manuscript "16" decimes due, carried to Spain by the Crowns Overseas Postal Service arriving there with red "YNDIAS" handstamp, indicating that it came from the West Indies and then forwarded to Bordeaux, very fine; illustrated in the American Stampless Cover Catalog; the earliest handstamped postmark in private hands from the Trans-Mississippi West; ex-Chase and Skinner.Louisiana was a Spanish colony from 1762 until 1800, when acquired by France in the secret Treaty of San Ildefonso. Because of the nature of this treaty, Spain continued to administer the colony until just twenty days before it was purchased by the United States on 20 December, 1803. (Image) Est. $7,500-10,000

SOLD for $28,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
15 c   Nouvelle Orleans, 18 January 1791, dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf to Bordeaux with manuscript 24 reales rate, carried to Spain by the Crowns Overseas
Postal Service, arriving with red two line straightline Islas deBarlovNouvelle Orleans, 18 January 1791, dateline on folded letter with integral address leaf to Bordeaux with manuscript "24" reales rate, carried to Spain by the Crowns Overseas Postal Service, arriving with red two line straightline "Islas de/Barlovento" handstamp indicating its origin in the West Indies, then forwarded to Bordeaux, very fine. (Image) Est. $750-1,000

SOLD for $3,250.00
Will close during Public Auction
16 c   NUEVAORLEANS, in fancy laureated oval Spanish Colonial period postmark struck in reddish brown on 1792 folded letter to Bordeaux, France, carried by the Crowns Overseas Postal
Service to Spain, where it received the YNDIAS (West Indies) originNUEVA/ORLEANS, in fancy laureated oval Spanish Colonial period postmark struck in reddish brown on 1792 folded letter to Bordeaux, France, carried by the Crowns Overseas Postal Service to Spain, where it received the "YNDIAS" (West Indies) origin handstamp, then overland arriving with a charge of "16" decimes due, horizontal file fold slightly affecting the town cancel, very fine cover and strike; only three examples of the "Nueva Orleans" marking are recorded, one being in the Museo Postal Cubano in Havana and the other in very poor condition; illustrated in the American Stampless Cover Catalog; ex-Skinner. (Image) Est. $10,000-15,000

SOLD for $30,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
NEW MEXICO
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
17 c   NUEVO MEXICO, bold vivid red straightline handstamp on cover from Santa Fe to the Alcalde (mayor) of Chiguagua (Chihuahua), Mexico from the Alcalde of theVilla s Sta Fee, with
manuscript 3 reales rate, flap missing, remarkably fresh and vNUEVO MEXICO, bold vivid red straightline handstamp on cover from Santa Fe to the Alcalde (mayor) of Chiguagua (Chihuahua), Mexico from the Alcalde of the"Villa s Sta Fee," with manuscript "3" reales rate, flap missing, remarkably fresh and very fine; this postmark was used at the Santa Fe post office during the Spanish and Mexican regimes, between 1800 and the American occupation in 1846, though there is no year date, it was most probably used in the 1820's after Mexico gained independence from Spain in 1821, this is the first cover to show that this postmark was applied at Santa Fe and it also is the earliest recorded use of this postmark by about twenty years.Santa Fe was founded by Pedro de Peralta, the Spanish governor of the province of New Mexico, during the winter of 1609-10. He named it La Villa Real de la Santa Fe de San Francisco de Asisi, or The Royal City of the Holy Faith of Saint Francis of Assisi - shortened to Santa Fe. There were only two Post Offices during this period, in what is now Arizona and New Mexico: Santa Fe and Tome. (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $32,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
18 c   TOME, bold red-brown straightline postmark on folded letter with integral address leaf datelined Belem (Belen) Mayo 20 de 1823 and addressed to Chihugua (Chihuahua) with
manuscript 3 reales rate, then forwarded to Arupe with an additional 3TOME, bold red-brown straightline postmark on folded letter with integral address leaf datelined "Belem (Belen) Mayo 20 de 1823" and addressed to Chihugua (Chihuahua) with manuscript "3" reales rate, then forwarded to Arupe with an additional "3" reales manuscript charge, fresh and extremely fine; the earliest known use of the Tome postmark by more than two decades.Tome was established by the Spanish government in 1695. Located about 80 miles south of Santa Fe, on the east side of the Rio Grande River. It was a station on El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro (The Royal Road of the Interior Land). Belen is a little southwest of Tome on the west side of the Rio Grande. (Image) Est. $5,000-7,500

SOLD for $52,500.00
Will close during Public Auction
TEXAS
Lot Symbol CatNo. Lot Description CV or Estimate
19 c   BAHIA, bold oval Spanish Colonial postmark and matching FRANCA (Paid) handstamp on remarkably fresh full folded letter (most are only fronts) datelined August 11, 1807 and
addressed to Bexar, the letter is on official business as per the ms. noBAHIA, bold oval Spanish Colonial postmark and matching "FRANCA" (Paid) handstamp on remarkably fresh full folded letter (most are only fronts) datelined August 11, 1807 and addressed to Bexar, the letter is on official business as per the ms. notation "R1. Serv" (Royal Service) from Jose Ogante, commander at La Bahia to Governor Don Antonio Cordero of Coahuila, extremely fine; the earliest dated use and the finest reported example; ex-Haas, Jarrett.Today Bahia is Goliad, Texas and Bexar is San Antonio. (Image) Est. $7,500-10,000

SOLD for $23,000.00
Will close during Public Auction
20 c   NACOGDOCHES, bold Mexican Colonial period negative circular postmark on circa 1828-30 folded cover dated June 8 and addressed to Captain Candido de Arcos, commander of the
soldiers of the second regiment stationed in Bexar (now San Antonio), manuNACOGDOCHES, bold Mexican Colonial period negative circular postmark on circa 1828-30 folded cover dated June 8 and addressed to Captain Candido de Arcos, commander of the soldiers of the second regiment stationed in Bexar (now San Antonio), manuscript "3" reales rate, carried down the Camino Real, small hole and flap missing, fresh and very fine. (Image) Est. $4,000-5,000

SOLD for $16,000.00
Will close during Public Auction

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